Is my heart rate too high?

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Hello,
So I've been doing this weight loss thing for about a year now and exercising longer than that so its not like I'm new to movement but I am concerned about my heart rate a little.

I have a Polar HRM and when I run it stays around a steady 195 unless I run up hills which it'll then go higher than that. Now if I get on a machine like an elliptical or a treadmill it never goes higher than 160. I'm just a little concerned about the high heart rate. Is this way too high? Should I maybe not run so much? Someone please give me a little insight. I've been running regularly for close to a year now so it cant be that I'm not use to it.

Thanks for any comments :)

Replies

  • firststepformefal
    firststepformefal Posts: 180 Member
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    Minimum needed is your age. Maximum heart rates depend on a formula with your age in it.
  • KBurkhardt08
    KBurkhardt08 Posts: 141 Member
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    Im 24 if that helps at all.
  • Working2BLean
    Working2BLean Posts: 386 Member
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    You can google max heart rate calculator

    From an article in Runners World

    Maximum heart rate for age is an elusive number. The usual equation is 220 – age = maximum heart rate (MHR), but that does not play out well when you look at individuals as many can tolerate higher heart rates and others cannot attain the formula driven number. This formula was empirically derived from young athletes. A study by Tanaka in 2001 looking at a broader age distribution showed that this formula often underestimated the MHR in older subjects and a revised formula fitted to the data resulted in this formula: MHR = 208 – 0.7(age). Another look at this by Gellish in 2007 showed good correlation to stress testing results using MHR = 207 – 0.7(age) with a p value of <0.001.
  • runnermama81
    runnermama81 Posts: 388 Member
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    What is your resting heart rate?
  • hekla90
    hekla90 Posts: 595 Member
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    Are you symptomatic? Do you have any other issues? That does seems high for running unless you are putting out max effort the whole time. If you are worried about something as important as your heart go see a doctor, don't get comforted or freaked by Internet people who don't have a whole picture of your health and such.
  • KBurkhardt08
    KBurkhardt08 Posts: 141 Member
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    What is your resting heart rate?

    Hi. My resting heart is usually around 65-75. Its been a while since I've been to the doctor but all of the normal things they check were always good. To answer about other issues I dont really notice any other issues other than I tend to cough a lot after running but thats always happened to. I do have a doctor appointment in a month but I figured I would just post on here for opinions before I go.
  • DopeItUp
    DopeItUp Posts: 18,771 Member
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    If you didn't die then I think you'll be just fine.
  • LKArgh
    LKArgh Posts: 5,179 Member
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    It sounds like you should slow down a bit. I would be more concerned about the coughing part, not breathing properly is not normal and will also cause your heart rate to rise. Talk to your dr.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,248 Member
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    What kind of pace are you running at? Are you gasping for breath or feeling light headed?

    My first suggestion would be to slow down somewhat (odd that you can't get it over 160 on a treadmill) and make sure you're running (most of the time) at a conversational pace.

    If you're really concerned about it talk to your Dr about getting a stress test done, that's the only really accurate way to determine what your max HR is.
  • beachhouse758
    beachhouse758 Posts: 371 Member
    edited November 2015
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    I was running at 185 (which is waaaay higher than what my Polar recommends) When I mentioned my HR to my father in law, who is a personal trainer, he totally freaked out.

    I was seen by a couple of cardiologist and mentioned this to one of them when I was having a stress test. By that time I had months worth of cardiovascular tests done (for something unrelated to my hear rate, btw), so the doctor felt comfortable in telling me that 185 was OK for me (not death level, like I thought)
    And to aim to keep *my* heart rate below 185 when running.

    He said that everyone is different. The range given by the HRM is an average. And my "range" was higher than the average and that was OK (based on my clearing the tests etc...)

    I am now going into week 7 of C25K and my HR max averages at 175 (instead of 185) So maybe the conditioning is helping, I don't know.

    I think if you are concerned, if you have family history of heart problems, or are experiencing any other symptoms, you should see a doctor. So the point of my reply is to let you know that the elevated heart rate *can be* normal for some people. But it is worth getting checked out, just in case.
  • Stoshew71
    Stoshew71 Posts: 6,553 Member
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    What kind of pace are you running at? Are you gasping for breath or feeling light headed?

    My first suggestion would be to slow down somewhat (odd that you can't get it over 160 on a treadmill) and make sure you're running (most of the time) at a conversational pace.

    If you're really concerned about it talk to your Dr about getting a stress test done, that's the only really accurate way to determine what your max HR is.

    This. Most of your running should be done at a conversational pace.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=veAQ73OJdwY
  • McCloud33
    McCloud33 Posts: 959 Member
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    I'm one that has a high HR when I run and a low resting HR (175-185 and 40-50). I know lots of people say "conversational pace" and that may be fine for most people. For me, if I'm not pushing myself I feel like I'm slacking. Usually pace wise this is how my HR looks 9min/mi - 150bpm, 8min/mi - 165bpm, 7min/mi - 175bpm, 6min or less - >185bpm. I usually try and run around 7min/mi pace, unless I plan on it being more than a 4 mile run and then I'm usually down at 7:30-8 depending on how far.

    Every body is different though.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,960 Member
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    If you're really concerned about it talk to your Dr about getting a stress test done, that's the only really accurate way to determine what your max HR is.

    Well, maybe. Those silly medical stress-test people stopped my treadmill stress test at around my age-estimated max, because they'd figured out what they needed to know about my heart. My actual max is around 20 beats higher than the formula they were using. (I've done a sport-oriented HR max test on the rowing machine, and have regularly trained based on that value, so I feel confident in saying this.)
    I think if you are concerned, if you have family history of heart problems, or are experiencing any other symptoms, you should see a doctor. So the point of my reply is to let you know that the elevated heart rate *can be* normal for some people. But it is worth getting checked out, just in case.

    So, this ^^^^. Definitely this ^^^^.

    Then, after they say you're totally healthy, if you're really interested in accurate heart rate training numbers - which are very useful in effective training for sports competition - then go to a sports testing facility to be tested for that. You might want to wait until you're moderately well-conditioned, as a true max test is a little . . . intense.
  • bubble_wrap0428
    bubble_wrap0428 Posts: 88 Member
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    I would say that's rather high. I usually am around 160 to 170 when running and I'm about your age. It just means your heart is working double to just run. Why don't you try a fitness test? See how long it takes your heart rate to go back to normal after cardio.
  • beemerphile1
    beemerphile1 Posts: 1,710 Member
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    If it isn't causing you any problem then it isn't too high. All those recommended rates and calculations are just estimates. We are all different.

    The only way to know you maximum heart rate is to be tested to the point of exhaustion and then they know your limit.