College Student with Unhealthy Habits

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  • mcconnelllkelly
    mcconnelllkelly Posts: 8 Member
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    I know it is very easy to lose motivation easily and it is discouraging when you don't see instant results, like I only lost 2 lbs so far and that's annoying but whatever. I love cheese, hate meal prepping, and I love sitting in my bed for hours but in order to make a change you need to honestly start some where and stop with the excuses. Every time someone comes up with an idea you rebuttal it. Bodybuilding.com has a lot of help, Livestrong.com as well, hell I get all my recipe ideas on Pinterest. You need to start off small and not go completely cold turkey cutting things out, that'll never work. Switch to soy or almond milk instead of dairy, walk to class instead of driving, set aside $75 a week to do a small food shopping and go with a list so you don't over spend or buy random crap (also stay on the perimeter of the store, all the isles in the middle are usually processed). Not getting to the gym because you study too much isn't even an excuse, Chris Gronkowski (Rob Gronkowski's brother) spent a week at Hardvard and said that the students were literally on the bikes and treadmills running. Not appealing I get it, but they get it done.

    Like others have said, the sooner you stop the excuses the sooner the extra lbs will fall off. Do research and get ideas. Good luck
  • jennifer_417
    jennifer_417 Posts: 12,344 Member
    edited December 2015
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    This is going to sound harsh, but I'm going to say it straightforwardly:
    Unless you're classes are going for 18+ hours a day, they probably not actually stopping you, they are merely making it inconvenient to go to the gym. Literally everyone else there is figuring out how to make it work with their classes.
    As far as food goes: If your mother is financially supporting you, then ok, she can have some say in what food you buy. Otherwise, her "getting on to" you is something you can learn to put up with.
    Also, you can still lose weight eating cafeteria food. You just have to eat fewer calories than you burn.
  • ultrahoon
    ultrahoon Posts: 467 Member
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    mblalock39 wrote: »
    Do you have any exercises that I could do in my dorm while studying or during study breaks? I have a decent sized dorm room. It's about 13X16

    Just eat slightly smaller serving sizes. You aren't overweight because you don't do any exercise in your room. You're overweight because you ate too many calories. If you try and solve this problem with purely exercise, then the moment you have a string of mid-terms / finals coming up, everything will go out the window and you'll gain some weight. Then you'll exercise it off, and find yourself in the exact same position when the next exam cycle / really tight deadline comes around.


  • kiela64
    kiela64 Posts: 1,447 Member
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    It sounds to me like the caf just flat out isn't a good option. My university caf is terrible too, not as bad as yours but we don't have a salad bar, there are very few veggie options (no vegetarian options with any protein! *facepalm*), and it's wildly overpriced. I think you should opt out of it as soon as possible, and get your food at the grocery store. You may have to spend a bit more money, which, I know, sounds awful & may upset your mom. But things like dried lentils are inexpensive & don't need to be refrigerated. Chopped fresh veggies can go in your fridge, like suggested above.

    The stress eating is a separate issue. I struggle with it myself. Most universities have to include therapy/counselling services, though the state of yours sounds dismal so if they do, take advantage of it, and if not maybe some self-help books can help? I find exercise helps me control my stress (and by extension my eating) & if you have a big room, bodyweight & yoga stuff can be great! If the gym is inconvenient/difficult to get to/stressful, just try working out on your own in your room. A yoga mat on the floor and some youtube videos & you're set! I also enjoy walking outdoors, though now it's winter I struggle more getting outside.

    Motivation is, again, a separate issue. It has to come from yourself. Motivational sayings, mantras, lists to remind yourself of what you want, etc. It's all tools, but the core motivation is internal. And if you don't really want it, it won't really happen. I see motivation, for myself, as a positive energy & a negative energy. Sometimes I have positive energy & it helps me work out, eat better, get more done, stop procrastinating, and feel good about myself. When I'm stressed I often have negative energy, which makes all of those things harder, and pushes me to think badly about myself, do destructive things, and avoid good ones. That's when I stress eat and don't exercise. Rewiring the way we think about ourselves and the things that we do takes time. It takes effort. And there will be slip ups and mistakes. But getting back up and trying again is how we learn to be motivated.

    I wish you all the best, nursing is a really difficult program! I understand that it can feel overwhelming & stressful. If you're living at school, that can also feel isolating and difficult, especially with the organization around food and time management. I'm still terrible at all of that. But I think that we can get better, and we can learn. There are a lot of great resources out here, and on the rest of the internet. Finding & implementing what works for us is a struggle & a process, but I think it's a worthwhile one. <3
  • jnz17
    jnz17 Posts: 17 Member
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    This is long, hope no one takes it the wrong way. It's just my personal experience and my friends' experience since I'm the same age as OP.

    I go to a competitive college where almost everyone has overloaded schedules and extracurriculars that last until midnight at least, but most people still find time to go to the gym at least 4 days a week for about an hour a day. Going every other day is an easier way to get into the habit. I understand where you're coming from with not having enough time. A lot of the working adults on this site think that everyone's college experience is identical to theirs, and like to say things like: "you'll only get more busy than you are now" and "you can't even imagine how much less time you'll have as a working adult"! It's really frustrating for me to hear, but even more frustrating for my mom to hear because she's a "working adult" and she can see firsthand that it's not true. So first of all, I'm validating your claim that you don't have enough time in the day. I know many of us survive with full schedules from 6 am to 1 am or later which is a lifestyle lots of people can't even imagine. Even if you're as busy as that, you can make time. There's always a way to minimize the time you waste on things you don't need to do. Study smarter, eat less elaborate meals, don't waste time on the computer or your phone. If you want it, you will make time for it.

    If you have anxiety about running into people you know at the gym, try going close to opening or closing. The other commenters seem harsh telling you to stop making excuses but it's actually true--you just need to push yourself out of the comfort zone and you'll find some time that works for you. My campus gym opens at 6 am, so I try to wake up at 6 and get there ASAP. It's really empty and a great time to work out. If you absolutely can't bring yourself to wake up early, then you should head over at 10:30 pm so you can get an hour in before closing. On days when I can't make myself wake up, I definitely head over at night. It's nice to have a backup option during the day so you don't get steered off course from your goals. As far as what you do once you get to the gym.. you could look into some options. A few friends of mine have had great results with group classes. I prefer to run/elliptical/arc trainer 45 minutes and then strength train 15 minutes per day on machines, alternating what I'm working out per session. Last year I had one semester where I was so busy that it was hard for me to get to the gym. So I got a yoga mat ($5) and some small 5-lb weights. I did core exercises in my room on the floor like planks, sit ups, etc. There are probably better ones that are more efficient and safer on the internet but I think strength training is really important for people our age. It helps with cutting out fat and energizes you for the rest of the day.

    Hold yourself accountable to your goals. I usually don't have time to count calories in the middle of the semester, so I set more broad rules. No refined sugar, no white carbs, etc. Avoid processed food, frozen meals, and oil. Don't go to restaurants to eat. If I break any of these things, I definitely need to hold myself accountable and skip something fun I was going to do (like sleep an extra hour, honestly, no one has time for "real fun") and spend that time at the gym or exercising some way I don't like. For example, I live in a 24 floor building so I might make myself climb the stairs up and down once if I have an ice cream in the middle of a strict dieting period.

    For dieting, it's probably difficult with a meal plan. I only had one my first year and I thought it was pretty annoying to try and diet with. I suggest sticking with eggs and fruit and vegetables at the dining hall if you can't find good chicken. I actually went veg for a few months a few years ago during high school and my diet was super successful. If you're only eating veg, watching your nutrient intake, and avoiding unhealthy things like sugar/oil, there's pretty much no way to mess up. Even if it tastes bad... just eat it. Emotionally divorce yourself from food.

    Hope this helps! Good luck to us next semester :)
  • beemerphile1
    beemerphile1 Posts: 1,710 Member
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    mblalock39 wrote: »
    We are a private school. Unfortunately we spend all of our money from our alumni on a new turf football field instead of getting rid of the roached and mold in the residence halls and getting decent food. Lots of people have complained but nothing has been done about the food.

    That sucks.

    Maybe next semester you should vote with your feet by changing schools.
  • callsitlikeiseeit
    callsitlikeiseeit Posts: 8,626 Member
    edited December 2015
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    mblalock39 wrote: »
    We are a private school. Unfortunately we spend all of our money from our alumni on a new turf football field instead of getting rid of the roached and mold in the residence halls and getting decent food. Lots of people have complained but nothing has been done about the food.

    That sucks.

    Maybe next semester you should vote with your feet by changing schools.

    i went to all private schools and had I had one valid complaint (and the food issue as well as health issues based on mold and insects would have been legitimate) would have had my grandfather (Who paid for my schooling) sending me to another school ASAP.

    but you are still making excuses ;)
  • StaciMarie1974
    StaciMarie1974 Posts: 4,138 Member
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    1. Set some goals for yourself. Make them reasonable, small even to start with. And make sure to hit them.
    2. Identify what you CAN do, instead of listing all the reasons you can't do something.
    3. Look for ways to multi-task. Read on the treadmill perhaps. (Tip: go a little slower and increase the incline.)
  • Psychgrrl
    Psychgrrl Posts: 3,177 Member
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    Who runs the food service? Is it run by the campus or an outside vendor (Aramark, Sodexo)? Meet with them and ask them to put healthier options on the menu.

    You can do a HIIT workout in 30 minutes. Some squats and clean and jerks in another 30 on another day.

    A Nursing major is tough, but what kind of nurse will you be if you aren't healthy? How can you help others with their health issues when you don't follow your own advice?

    If you're a stress eater, find other coping strategies. Maybe exercise! Visit the campus's counseling center and ask for some help with stress management.
  • KrisiAnnH
    KrisiAnnH Posts: 352 Member
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    mblalock39 wrote: »
    Do you have any exercises that I could do in my dorm while studying or during study breaks? I have a decent sized dorm room. It's about 13X16

    As I mentioned in a previous post, FitnessBlender is a great resource. You can search for workouts based on equipment used (or none at all), length, body area worked on, calories burned, difficulty etc.

    But as many people have already told you, diet is an important part of weightloss. As someone previously mentioned you didnt put weight on because you didnt workout in your dorm room. Exercise should be used in conjunction with a moderated diet :)

    I'd definitely recommend reading thoroughly through all the responses OP, there's a lot of good advice that you dont seem to be responding to.
  • cafeaulait7
    cafeaulait7 Posts: 2,459 Member
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    Check out rent nearby and see if it's cheaper to live off campus. That's what I did with my private school that was taking far too much money for what they gave in terms of refectory and dorms. I still really liked the academics, so if you aren't even set on those, do change schools. Private schools tend to cost way too much to stay at one if you aren't happy!