Lifting & Toe Pain

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I'm about 9 mo into SL5x5 and as the weights are slowy getting heavier, I'm really feeling it in my toes of all places. I've been wearing New Balance Minimus but just bought some Chucks in hopes that they'd help. After lifting yesterday, I woke up with pretty painful toes today. Anything I may be doing wrong to cause this? I don't have anyone to film me for form check.

Replies

  • rejectuf
    rejectuf Posts: 487 Member
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    Odd. When you squat, are you pushing up with your feet planted or are you coming up on the balls of your feet?

    I've never encountered toe pain from lifts.
  • Warchortle
    Warchortle Posts: 2,197 Member
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    I have issues with my feet and I found foam rolling my calves helps a lot. Do you curl your toes when you lift?
  • sistrsprkl
    sistrsprkl Posts: 1,013 Member
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    Specifically, it's the joints at the bases of my middle toes. I try to make sure my feet stay planted on all lifts, not aware of any toe curling.
  • fiddletime
    fiddletime Posts: 1,862 Member
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    I'd see a podiatrist. I had big toe pain, thought it was one thing, but the podiatrist found three things going on (so Dr. Google was right on one of them). I now wear orthotics.
  • LninYoDA1htownG
    LninYoDA1htownG Posts: 75 Member
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    Try rolling the bottom of your feet with a tennis ball relieve the tension in the middle
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 24,840 Member
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    Are you trying to grip the floor with your toes?

    I do that when I cycle downhill. I'm not fond of cycling downhill after a bad crash in 2007, and since then, I find myself trying to grip something with my toes when I go downhill. It is a subconscious thing and I don't notice it until my feet hurt.
  • holothuroidea
    holothuroidea Posts: 772 Member
    edited January 2016
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    Even if your feet remain flat on the floor during the lift, the weight can move forward at the bottom of the squat and you will end up pushing up with the weight over your toes instead of your heels. This can happen if you have mobility issues, especially in the thoracic spine, or if your core strength/stability isn't up to par for the weight you're lifting.

    Putting small plates under your heels when you squat can go a long way to help in the short term while you work on increasing your mobility. If you have core strength problems, incorporating higher rep sets at lower weights will improve your stability and you can also incorporate core strength movements into your accessory lifts.

    (voice of experience)
  • sistrsprkl
    sistrsprkl Posts: 1,013 Member
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    Thanks for the feedback. I rolled my feet on a nubby foam roller I have and lifted in my new Chucks today. Big improvement, think it was a shoe issue.