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Which is more difficult? Gaining or Losing?

CFaulkner97CFaulkner97 Posts: 71Member, Premium Member Posts: 71Member, Premium Member
I get that both have mind over matter factors. I just feel that people believe gaining is easier because obesity is such a big/common issue in comparison. I have a hard time thinking losing is easier even though I've never tried myself. Most of the time I am at the point where my mind is telling me I can't intake any more but I have to force myself to keep going. Anybody agree/disagree?
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  • Christine_72Christine_72 Posts: 16,074Member Member Posts: 16,074Member Member
    For me it is ALOT easier to eat more than it is to eat less
  • CFaulkner97CFaulkner97 Posts: 71Member, Premium Member Posts: 71Member, Premium Member
    For me it is ALOT easier to eat more than it is to eat less

    Have you had experience with trying to gain weight?
  • Christine_72Christine_72 Posts: 16,074Member Member Posts: 16,074Member Member
    For me it is ALOT easier to eat more than it is to eat less

    Have you had experience with trying to gain weight?

    ah ha Good question. No I have not. However I could easily eat upward of 1000 calories of my TDEE most days if left to my own devices.

    I assume you're trying to bulk?

  • CFaulkner97CFaulkner97 Posts: 71Member, Premium Member Posts: 71Member, Premium Member
    Yes I am in taking a minimum of 3500 calories. I get that both goals can get discouraging and every bodies bodies are different but I sometimes tell myself I wish that I needed to lose weight instead of gain
  • juggernaut1974juggernaut1974 Posts: 6,212Member Member Posts: 6,212Member Member
    Obviously - in the first 37-ish years of my life, I found it much easier to gain than lose.

    That was before I really cared though.

    Once I put my mind toward a fitness goal, and educated myself on calories, macros, etc, I really didn't find losing all that difficult. Mentally, I'd say I had a bigger problem once I decided to stop losing, and bulk back up a bit.

    There was a great article posted some time ago on the weight gain forum regarding the "former fat boy syndrome" and the mental hurdles one has to overcome to stop 'dieting'.

    ETA: Here it is

    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/1069962/the-former-fat-boy-girl-syndrome/p1
    edited February 2016
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 36,764Member Member Posts: 36,764Member Member
    As an 18 year old male, you're likely to have a harder time gaining, particularly if you're active as your body is going through a lot of changes that require a lot of energy...I never used to believe people when they told me that would all change...then I turned 30 and gaining weight was not something I had to try very hard to do. It is far easier for me now to put on weight than to take it off...not that it's particularly hard to take off necessarily, but it's a lot easier for me to unconsciously overeat now than it is for me to consciously decide to restrict calories.
  • ladydsbladydsb Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
    I have never tried to gain weight. I'm thick so losing weight is for me. I have heard it is hard to gain weight because most thin people metabolism is high.
  • harrybananasharrybananas Posts: 292Member Member Posts: 292Member Member
    You said it yourself. Gaining simply is easier because if not, there would not be an obesity problem, or at least to a lesser degree. It's good that you can control your intake, as that is essential for losing weight if you ever decide to lose.

    Instead of eating high amounts of food in weight, eat food that is higher in calories.
  • CFaulkner97CFaulkner97 Posts: 71Member, Premium Member Posts: 71Member, Premium Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    As an 18 year old male, you're likely to have a harder time gaining, particularly if you're active as your body is going through a lot of changes that require a lot of energy...I never used to believe people when they told me that would all change...then I turned 30 and gaining weight was not something I had to try very hard to do. It is far easier for me now to put on weight than to take it off...not that it's particularly hard to take off necessarily, but it's a lot easier for me to unconsciously overeat now than it is for me to consciously decide to restrict calories.

    Right. I guess it varies person to person. There probably isn't any right answer. I was born in a little Japanese family so my family don't have overweight problems in their genetics.
  • CFaulkner97CFaulkner97 Posts: 71Member, Premium Member Posts: 71Member, Premium Member
    You said it yourself. Gaining simply is easier because if not, there would not be an obesity problem, or at least to a lesser degree. It's good that you can control your intake, as that is essential for losing weight if you ever decide to lose.

    Instead of eating high amounts of food in weight, eat food that is higher in calories.

    I can't fully agree with this statement. I've had multiple attempts to bulk where I end up not gaining a pound. Then when I give up my diet I somehow lose a pound or two
  • chastity0921chastity0921 Posts: 226Member Member Posts: 226Member Member
    I've always heard gaining was more difficult. Just think having to routinely eat more than your body wants. Sounds horrible to me. I'd rather have a little tummy growl than feel like I need to throw up all the time.
  • CFaulkner97CFaulkner97 Posts: 71Member, Premium Member Posts: 71Member, Premium Member
    I've always heard gaining was more difficult. Just think having to routinely eat more than your body wants. Sounds horrible to me. I'd rather have a little tummy growl than feel like I need to throw up all the time.

    Yeah it's hard. But I feel my workouts would be weak without the amount of carbs i intake. Also I bet restricting calories makes you feel less energized as well
  • CTRLplusZCTRLplusZ Posts: 23Member Member Posts: 23Member Member
    I think that specifying what you are gaining or losing is important. It's easy to gain fat by overeating and being sedentary however gaining muscle is hard because you must eat and do activity that promotes muscle growth.

    Losing pounds is easily done by manipulating food and water, however lower weight does not always give the desired result in overall bodyfat and appearance.

    Therefore, I conclude that the goal of gaining muscle and losing fat is hardest as it requires the most effort and strategy.
  • Christine_72Christine_72 Posts: 16,074Member Member Posts: 16,074Member Member
    I think that specifying what you are gaining or losing is important. It's easy to gain fat by overeating and being sedentary however gaining muscle is hard because you must eat and do activity that promotes muscle growth.

    Losing pounds is easily done by manipulating food and water, however lower weight does not always give the desired result in overall bodyfat and appearance.

    Therefore, I conclude that the goal of gaining muscle and losing fat is hardest as it requires the most effort and strategy.

    Nicely explained
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    For me, gaining weight (any kind) is harder than losing, though at 21 I do have age on my side in this. I also have a small frame size due to genetics.
  • AnvilHeadAnvilHead Posts: 18,543Member Member Posts: 18,543Member Member
    Gaining is very easy for me because I love food and have a huge appetite. If left to an ad-lib diet I could (and did) easily take in 4000+ calories/day without batting an eye. It always puzzles me when I see posters complaining about how it's soooo hard to hit their 1200 calorie per day goal, because not reaching my goal has never been a problem for me. I didn't put on 50 extra pounds by not eating enough!

    I don't find losing weight particularly difficult because I have a very flexible palate and can easily tailor what I eat to more nutrient-dense foods for satiety. I also understand that trying to lose as fast as possible comes with a lot of drawbacks, so I have no problem with losing at a reasonable rate - which means a smaller, more comfortable deficit. But compared to gaining, losing involves more self-discipline and vigilance. The hardest part about gaining would be staying the course on a small'ish surplus for best body composition results - it would be a lot easier to throw caution to the wind and go on a GFH bulk!
  • ryborybo Posts: 5,437Member Member Posts: 5,437Member Member
    I've always laughed at that phrase "you can't out train a bad diet". They've obviously never met a young adult male hammering the weights and trying to gain.
  • SingRunTingSingRunTing Posts: 2,605Member Member Posts: 2,605Member Member
    I think a lot of is comes down to what your TDEE is.

    For me, my TDEE works out to ~2150. So a cut means eating below 2000 calories, which can be hard after a while when balancing with real life events like birthdays, holidays, and just going out. A bulk means still eating under 3000 calories, which is pretty easy to do.

    For someone who's TDEE is 3500, a cut can still be over 3000 calories, which is manageable. But a bulk means being 3750 to 4000 calories which can be hard to do on a day to day basis.

    It's all about perspective. My bulk = your cut. So it's very different based on where you fall.
  • becky10rpbecky10rp Posts: 573Member Member Posts: 573Member Member
    Neither. Maintaining is the hardest.
  • EverdomadEverdomad Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
    I'm losing for the first time in my life, after deliberately gaining about seven years ago. As long as I'm calorie counting, I find losing to be easier.

    If I eat as much as others say I should I feel intolerably full.
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