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Effects of Long Term Deficit

RoseTheWarriorRoseTheWarrior Posts: 2,040Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,040Member, Premium Member
Hello! I'm hoping to get some debate/info going about whether or not it's "good" to stay in a calorie deficit for long periods of time. For those who have a lot of weight to lose, is it OK to just stay in a deficit for say, a year or two years straight? Or is it better for them (talking overall health) if they take a break say, every six months, and eat at maintenance for a couple of weeks? Or does it make no difference at all? Is there any science info surrounding this? Can staying in a deficit for years harm people's metabolism or ability to burn fat? It doesn't seem so based on success stories, but I'm just not sure. Discuss :smiley:
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Replies

  • zyxstzyxst Posts: 9,145Member Member Posts: 9,145Member Member
    I was on a deficit for 3 years. I took a maintenance break Jan - Feb 2015 to check my maintenance level calories, and went back to eating less. I don't seem to have any problems with my metabolism or health.
  • moe0303moe0303 Posts: 933Member Member Posts: 933Member Member
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,184Member Member Posts: 3,184Member Member
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    moe0303 wrote: »
    Seemed to work for this guy, who ate nothing for a year.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2495396/pdf/postmedj00315-0056.pdf

    Kudo to that guy!!!!!!
  • klmcneil1klmcneil1 Posts: 26Member Member Posts: 26Member Member
    On the contrary, the science seems to suggest that a lower calorie diet (either throgh periodic fasting or daily calorie restriction) is actually very good for you:
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-intermittent-fasting-might-help-you-live-longer-healthier-life/
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,424Member Member Posts: 24,424Member Member
    klmcneil1 wrote: »
    On the contrary, the science seems to suggest that a lower calorie diet (either throgh periodic fasting or daily calorie restriction) is actually very good for you:
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-intermittent-fasting-might-help-you-live-longer-healthier-life/

    Actually that article suggests that no, the science is pretty inconclusive as of now.
  • chrislee1628chrislee1628 Posts: 304Member Member Posts: 304Member Member
    nothing for one year? I don't think I could go one day lol
  • moe0303moe0303 Posts: 933Member Member Posts: 933Member Member
    wytey wrote: »
    nothing for one year? I don't think I could go one day lol
    It should be noted that it was medically supervised.
  • msf74msf74 Posts: 3,501Member Member Posts: 3,501Member Member
    moe0303 wrote: »
    wytey wrote: »
    nothing for one year? I don't think I could go one day lol
    It should be noted that it was medically supervised.

    Yes, and the paper quite rightly makes note of the five fatalities coinciding with (although not necessarily caused by) the treatment of obesity by total starvation.
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    lithezebra wrote: »
    moe0303 wrote: »
    Seemed to work for this guy, who ate nothing for a year.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2495396/pdf/postmedj00315-0056.pdf

    Kudo to that guy!!!!!!

    My take away from medically recorded cases like this I can without fear go 24 hours without eating in my case. :)

  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    klmcneil1 wrote: »
    On the contrary, the science seems to suggest that a lower calorie diet (either throgh periodic fasting or daily calorie restriction) is actually very good for you:
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-intermittent-fasting-might-help-you-live-longer-healthier-life/

    I agree a lower calorie diet is associated with a longer life span almost universally. I just wish we always knew "lower than what". :)

    According to USDA we know on average an adult female needs 2000 to have full health and a male requires on average around 2300 calories to have full health so if either are eating 3000 calories a day then yes a lower calorie. Then the question of what macro of carbs, protein and fats is best for the average person?

    Average means nothing because it means everything someone whats it to mean.
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    shell1005 wrote: »
    I think that there can be two things to consider here....the physical and the emotional aspects of losing weight.

    As for the physical side of it....there isn't going to be any significant difference or damage to your maintaining metabolism by staying in a deficit for an extended period of time (years, not months). There is some links above to some lovely science saying the same, etc. There used to be a weight loss myth that your metabolism would drop and bottom out if you stayed on a diet for a long time...but happily that has been debunked.

    Now for the mental side of it, that one is really personal preference. There often is not published medical studies on the psych side of things because your mileage will vary depending on how you react to the stimulus aka "an extended period of dieting." I have never lost more than a 100 lbs, so my weight loss was always accomplished in less than a year, but from being in treatment with those who lost a large amount and also being a mental health professional.....I think that there could be emotional advantages to taking a break if you will need to be in a deficit for years to meet your goal. Some may want to keep trucking until goal and never take a break, but some others might like a small break to eat at maintenance just to give some time off from the mental stress of losing weight.

    Physically? There is no ill effect. Mentally? That's up to you.

    This is spot on. When I moved from trying to lose weight to try to gaining better health by stopping dieting for weight loss was a game changer and was really just a mental change. Without good physical/mental health I see no way in my case of eating in a way to promote longevity and being able to walk and talk the entire way. We may be able to change overnight but the body may need a few years to change. :)
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    klmcneil1 wrote: »
    On the contrary, the science seems to suggest that a lower calorie diet (either throgh periodic fasting or daily calorie restriction) is actually very good for you:
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-intermittent-fasting-might-help-you-live-longer-healthier-life/

    Actually that article suggests that no, the science is pretty inconclusive as of now.

    This is so true. At the age of 65 I have decided every way to managing mental/physical health for diet has some validity for someone. Humans have some similarities genetically speaking but mentally speaking we can be very different leading the same genes to act very differently.

    Most all self help books are written to make money so the writers often play to our emotions rather than our intellect. I know what working for me today but I not tell another what will work for them in a specific.

    One can hopefully through intuition and trial and error learn what to eat and when to eat it for the best health. At this point I do not expect to read one book for the full answer. As @EvgeniZyntx points out the science is pretty inconclusive as of now.

    As I go deeper into reading research I am starting to realize we really do not even grasp the mental/physical processes that has brought mankind to this point in time. As our understanding increase hopefully that will help.

    The main thing is we need to have an open mind and not work to close the minds of others. No one here can tell another social media person what they need to eat for the best health in a specific and meaningful way.

  • ninerbuffninerbuff Posts: 42,523Member, Greeter Member Posts: 42,523Member, Greeter Member
    Like anything else, if the body is subjected to a CONSTANT physical change, it will try to adapt. In term of diet, long term deficit will have the body shift to being more conservative with calorie usage. A deficit will automatically lower metabolic rate. A consistent deficit over time with no change in diet (with the exception of adjusting to lowering calories as weight goes down), will have the body adjusting by going into homestasis.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • Nikion901Nikion901 Posts: 3,058Member Member Posts: 3,058Member Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Like anything else, if the body is subjected to a CONSTANT physical change, it will try to adapt. In term of diet, long term deficit will have the body shift to being more conservative with calorie usage. A deficit will automatically lower metabolic rate. A consistent deficit over time with no change in diet (with the exception of adjusting to lowering calories as weight goes down), will have the body adjusting by going into homestasis.
    /quote]

    British Dictionary definitions for homeostasis Expand
    homeostasis
    /ˌhəʊmɪəʊˈsteɪsɪs/
    noun
    1.
    the maintenance of metabolic equilibrium within an animal by a tendency to compensate for disrupting changes
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Like anything else, if the body is subjected to a CONSTANT physical change, it will try to adapt. In term of diet, long term deficit will have the body shift to being more conservative with calorie usage. A deficit will automatically lower metabolic rate. A consistent deficit over time with no change in diet (with the exception of adjusting to lowering calories as weight goes down), will have the body adjusting by going into homestasis.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    https://khanacademy.org/partner-content/mit-k12/mit-k12-biology/v/homeostasis

    @ninerbuff you used the word 'homostasis' so I looked it up and found this meaning.

    Does this mean if I shift my calories eaten up by say 10% that it may not all be stored as fat but perhaps it may automatically increase my metabolic rate therefore automatically increase the CO of CICO?


  • DaisyHamiltonDaisyHamilton Posts: 576Member Member Posts: 576Member Member
    moe0303 wrote: »
    Seemed to work for this guy, who ate nothing for a year.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2495396/pdf/postmedj00315-0056.pdf

    This was actually a very interesting read. Thanks!
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Like anything else, if the body is subjected to a CONSTANT physical change, it will try to adapt. In term of diet, long term deficit will have the body shift to being more conservative with calorie usage. A deficit will automatically lower metabolic rate. A consistent deficit over time with no change in diet (with the exception of adjusting to lowering calories as weight goes down), will have the body adjusting by going into homestasis.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    https://khanacademy.org/partner-content/mit-k12/mit-k12-biology/v/homeostasis

    @ninerbuff you used the word 'homostasis' so I looked it up and found this meaning.

    Does this mean if I shift my calories eaten up by say 10% that it may not all be stored as fat but perhaps it may automatically increase my metabolic rate therefore automatically increase the CO of CICO?


    That's the idea behind reverse dieting.
  • RWClaryRWClary Posts: 192Member Member Posts: 192Member Member
    Nobody ever asks about the possible affects of a prolonged calorie surplus...THEY JUST DO IT!
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