Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

How to help grandfather lose weight?

mattb2987mattb2987 Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
Hi all, first post here and was hoping to get some help.
My grandad has always had an issue with weight but has started putting more on since my grandma died last year.
Sweets and chocolate is not an issue but bread and potatoes are, he eats a lot of carbs, pasties etc. Does anyone have some suggestions of recipes for things to replace carbs with to trick your appetite? And any suggestions on how to help an 80 year old with little motivation to lose weight?
Thanks very much in advance :)

Replies

  • 12by31112by311 Posts: 1,719Member Member Posts: 1,719Member Member
    When/if I reach 80 years old, I'm not dieting or counting calories.
  • blues4milesblues4miles Posts: 1,481Member Member Posts: 1,481Member Member
    12by311 wrote: »
    When/if I reach 80 years old, I'm not dieting or counting calories.

    This. Also, if you were writing this about your spouse instead of your grandfather, you'd probably be getting a lot of folks telling you you can't really make someone else lose weight or eat healthier. They have to want it for themselves. Carbs themselves aren't the issue, your granddad is overweight because he eats too much. Taking away the things he appears to like the most may not be the most effective strategy towards compliance. If you are cooking for him, you can make things in portions and nutrients that you believe will be healthiest for him. But if presumably he is taking care of himself right now, he gets to make those decisions.
  • SarcasmIsMyLoveLanguageSarcasmIsMyLoveLanguage Posts: 2,688Member Member Posts: 2,688Member Member
    I love that you're concerned.
    I can speak to this from a bit of experience. My Grandma is currently 89 and had a heart attack a few years ago. Her GP at the time told her to lose 20 lbs immediately, along with some other advice. We tried for a while to change her eating habits but soon determined she was miserable. After a heartfelt conversation, the family has decided to make a few healthy changes but not to go hog-wild. Grandma has lived a good, long life and she doesn't want to spend her last remaining days counting calories and depriving herself of the foods she loves. While I want to see her around for a long time, I totally understand and respect her choice.
    Have you spoken with your granddad? Maybe you can reach a midpoint?
  • nikkit321nikkit321 Posts: 733Member Member Posts: 733Member Member
    Maybe try to encourage a gentle walk after meals and not worry about the food choices. My dad is 81 and has high cholesterol, but is losing weight very quickly because of a medication with an appetite suppressant side effect. We decided that he should be able to eat anything that sounds good, in whatever quantity, because the goal of maintaining/gaining weight is more important than lowering cholesterol.
  • mattb2987mattb2987 Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
    Thanks for the quick replies! The main goal at the moment is to stop him putting on any more weight, I know he's not going to lose huge amounts but we want to make sure he can remain independent for as long as possible.
    The gentle walks is a great idea thanks. Does anybody have any foods they eat in place of potatoes/chips? If I could cook him something and show him a healthy alternative he might like and could cook himself I think that would be a great help.
  • rsclausersclause Posts: 3,125Member Member Posts: 3,125Member Member
    Those dense calorie carbs are tasty and habit forming. Its tough to change that habit too. If someone is cooking for him it could be done but I won't be wagering any money on it.
  • LounmounLounmoun Posts: 8,397Member Member Posts: 8,397Member Member
    mattb2987 wrote: »
    Thanks for the quick replies! The main goal at the moment is to stop him putting on any more weight, I know he's not going to lose huge amounts but we want to make sure he can remain independent for as long as possible.
    The gentle walks is a great idea thanks. Does anybody have any foods they eat in place of potatoes/chips? If I could cook him something and show him a healthy alternative he might like and could cook himself I think that would be a great help.

    My father is around that age. After my mom died he wasn't much interested cooking for himself because he was eating alone. He remarried and that probably helped a bit except they eat out a lot.
    Do you or other famy live nearby so you could invite him to eat with you?
    There are lots of easy foods but if he really wants potatoes maybe baked or roasted instead of fried would be a direction to take.
    Weight loss and maintenance is about calories not type of food.
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Posts: 4,859Member Member Posts: 4,859Member Member
    12by311 wrote: »
    When/if I reach 80 years old, I'm not dieting or counting calories.

    If rr keeps yout from having someone else having to wipe your butt you might. Lack of mobility to do everyday tasks is the prime reason people are in assisted living. Losing weight will generally help with mobility.

    My MIL God love her is 86 walks 3 miles a day at least, water aerobics 3-4 times a week, watches what she eats and is a bit concerned about the slight belly she can't get rid of.
    edited April 2016
  • cross2bearcross2bear Posts: 1,106Member Member Posts: 1,106Member Member
    Its pretty hard to get someone else to change habits if you are not in control of what and how much they are eating. You can suggest that he try cauliflower, sweet potatoes or any other veg to take the place of potatoes or chips, but he may not know how to prepare something new and might have to be shown or have some made for him to show him some other options. Its probably too because they are cheap and quick. Thanks for bringing my grandfather to my mind! I miss him.
  • mattb2987mattb2987 Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member

    Exactly, I know his independence is of great importance. At the moment he's okay but struggles to for example put his socks on in the morning, we just don't want it to get any worse.

    Thanks for the suggestions! I'll definitely try cauliflower maybe as a mash. I think I'm going to try preparing some healthy meals myself and when perfected try cooking it for him. Has anyone tried roasted turnips as an alternative for potatoes? And what would be the best type of bread to eat if you were watching your weight?

    (I'm not very experienced in trying to lose weight!)
    edited April 2016
  • LounmounLounmoun Posts: 8,397Member Member Posts: 8,397Member Member
    mattb2987 wrote: »
    Exactly, I know his independence is of great importance. At the moment he's okay but struggles to for example put his socks on in the morning, we just don't want it to get any worse.

    Thanks for the suggestions! I'll definitely try cauliflower maybe as a mash. I think I'm going to try preparing some healthy meals myself and when perfected try cooking it for him. Has anyone tried roasted turnips as an alternative for potatoes? And what would be the best type of bread to eat if you were watching your weight?

    (I'm not very experienced in trying to lose weight!)

    Does your grandfather want to lose weight or just maintain?
    Losing or maintaining weight is about calories. You need to figure out his current calorie needs based on activity level, age, gender, height, current weight. If he wants to lose weight at a rate of 1 lb a week then that would be 500 calories less than his maintenace level, .5 lb a week would be 250 calories below maintenance for him.
    The big thing is him eating appropriate portion sizes of foods. Weighing and measuring food helps with that.
    A potato of the same weight as a turnip is only 46 calories more and is full of nutrition too. Your grandfather can eat potatoes every day if he wants. Most vegetables are pretty low calorie until you put cheese, oil, butter or other sauces on them.
    Eggs are cheap, fast to cook and nutritious. A big pot of soup could be frozen in individual portions and reheated easily.
    The bread that fits your grandfather's calorie goal is fine. Wholegrain bread will have the most fiber. Calories vary so check the labels.
  • cross2bearcross2bear Posts: 1,106Member Member Posts: 1,106Member Member
    Any bread is ok, just mind the slices per day that are consumed. If you are looking for a lower calorie bread, or a multi grain or something like that, you will have to read a lot of labels to find one that you think is appropriate, as they vary so much from one another. There is always Weight Watchers bread, but the reason it is lower in calories is because the slices are smaller than average.
  • tomtebodatomteboda Posts: 2,176Member Member Posts: 2,176Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    12by311 wrote: »
    When/if I reach 80 years old, I'm not dieting or counting calories.

    If rr keeps yout from having someone else having to wipe your butt you might. Lack of mobility to do everyday tasks is the prime reason people are in assisted living. Losing weight will generally help with mobility.

    I agree with both of these quotes. Quality of life is important. Both excessive concern about diet and excessive weight can significantly impact quality of life.

    No one wants to nitpick their diet for their last few years. No one wants to reply in others to wipe their bottom either.

    I'd suggest having a compassionate talk and listen to what your grandfather wants, and what the probable outcomes of him changing habits and losing weight vs not doing so are.


  • kgirlhartkgirlhart Posts: 2,982Member Member Posts: 2,982Member Member
    12by311 wrote: »
    When/if I reach 80 years old, I'm not dieting or counting calories.

    Agreed.

    Are you preparing his meals? Has he asked for your help? Because if the answer to either of these questions is no then there really isn't anything you can do.
  • laur357laur357 Posts: 896Member Member Posts: 896Member Member
    Chips could possibly be replaced with air-popped popcorn. More volume and fiber for potentially fewer calories. Still lots of crunch. And you can get some flavors going on - cinnamon sugar, parmesan, herbs, a drizzle of buffalo sauce.

Sign In or Register to comment.