Protein?

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sexymom04
sexymom04 Posts: 263 Member
I know in order to gain muscle you need to eat more protein. I'm 132 lbs and need 132 g or protein. How can I get that much in a day? What do you do to get more protein?
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Replies

  • sunnybeaches105
    sunnybeaches105 Posts: 2,831 Member
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    The recommended intake for strength athletes is 1 gram per pound of lean body mass or about 0.8 grams per pound of total body weight. Are you doing heavy strength training? If not you don't need that much.

    As for getting that much it's easy. Focus your diet on things like chicken breast, sirloin, lean pork loin, fish, shellfish, egg whites, cottage cheese, and yogurt, and then get plenty of veggies and fruit.
  • willammoney
    willammoney Posts: 137 Member
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    I ignore protein and macros in general
  • mom22dogs
    mom22dogs Posts: 470 Member
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    You don't need that much. .8 per lb is enough. I'm 148 and I just talked to my trainer today, and he told me I need about 120-125 grams of protein a day. I do fairly vigorous weight lifting. Not super heavy, but work out hard. And actually to gain muscle, you need to up your carbs. Protein is to retain muscle.
  • sexymom04
    sexymom04 Posts: 263 Member
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    The recommended intake for strength athletes is 1 gram per pound of lean body mass or about 0.8 grams per pound of total body weight. Are you doing heavy strength training? If not you don't need that much.

    As for getting that much it's easy. Focus your diet on things like chicken breast, sirloin, lean pork loin, fish, shellfish, egg whites, cottage cheese, and yogurt, and then get plenty of veggies and fruit.

    I'm doing a program from bodybuilding.com, I just started, week 2 tomorrow. I'm lifting heavy as I just started
  • sexymom04
    sexymom04 Posts: 263 Member
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    mom22dogs wrote: »
    You don't need that much. .8 per lb is enough. I'm 148 and I just talked to my trainer today, and he told me I need about 120-125 grams of protein a day. I do fairly vigorous weight lifting. Not super heavy, but work out hard. And actually to gain muscle, you need to up your carbs. Protein is to retain muscle.

    Ok so I would only need about 100 grams a day then. I don't lift heavy as I just started. And I didn't know about the carbs, good to know. Thanks. So now look into carbs lol
  • kimny72
    kimny72 Posts: 16,013 Member
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    I aim for @ 100 grams and usually fall a little short. Most of it comes from chicken, fish, yogurt, eggs, and protein powder. I also get a little from nuts and grains.
  • pwillis20
    pwillis20 Posts: 30 Member
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    To many carbs and you won't burn them all for energy, which will result in cell storage and produce body fat so be conscious of upping your carbs. If you do though, focus on eating the majority of carbs as close to your workout as possible, pre and post.
  • martyqueen52
    martyqueen52 Posts: 1,120 Member
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    ^^^^ wrong. Carbs don't make you fat at all, I promise. Don't believe me? Do read articles from Layne Norton, Alan Aragon, Paul Carter, Jim Wendler.
  • sunnybeaches105
    sunnybeaches105 Posts: 2,831 Member
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    pwillis20 wrote: »
    To many carbs and you won't burn them all for energy, which will result in cell storage and produce body fat so be conscious of upping your carbs. If you do though, focus on eating the majority of carbs as close to your workout as possible, pre and post.

    No one gains fat in a calorie deficit regardless of carb intake.

    OP - in addition to protein target about 0.35 grams of fat per pound of body weight. Then, after accounting for protein and fat, get you remaining calories through carbs.
  • JackieMarie1989jgw
    JackieMarie1989jgw Posts: 230 Member
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    The recommended intake for strength athletes is 1 gram per pound of lean body mass or about 0.8 grams per pound of total body weight. Are you doing heavy strength training? If not you don't need that much.

    As for getting that much it's easy. Focus your diet on things like chicken breast, sirloin, lean pork loin, fish, shellfish, egg whites, cottage cheese, and yogurt, and then get plenty of veggies and fruit.

    I thought the guideline was 0.8-1.2g /kg a day, not per pound? That is what I have been going by (61 kg, goal of 74 gm protein a day). I am not an athlete by any stretch of the imagination, though, and am doing only light resistance training for muscle maintenance. I am just curious because that is a biiig difference, pound vs kg
  • sunnybeaches105
    sunnybeaches105 Posts: 2,831 Member
    Options
    The recommended intake for strength athletes is 1 gram per pound of lean body mass or about 0.8 grams per pound of total body weight. Are you doing heavy strength training? If not you don't need that much.

    As for getting that much it's easy. Focus your diet on things like chicken breast, sirloin, lean pork loin, fish, shellfish, egg whites, cottage cheese, and yogurt, and then get plenty of veggies and fruit.

    I thought the guideline was 0.8-1.2g /kg a day, not per pound? That is what I have been going by (61 kg, goal of 74 gm protein a day). I am not an athlete by any stretch of the imagination, though, and am doing only light resistance training for muscle maintenance. I am just curious because that is a biiig difference, pound vs kg

    The guideline ratio I used correctly uses pounds. Check out this link to a brief discussion from Alan Aragon which also links to a Helms study. See #3 in this: http://www.alanaragonblog.com/2015/01/06/frequently-asked-questions-about-the-lean-muscle-diet/
  • JackieMarie1989jgw
    JackieMarie1989jgw Posts: 230 Member
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    The recommended intake for strength athletes is 1 gram per pound of lean body mass or about 0.8 grams per pound of total body weight. Are you doing heavy strength training? If not you don't need that much.

    As for getting that much it's easy. Focus your diet on things like chicken breast, sirloin, lean pork loin, fish, shellfish, egg whites, cottage cheese, and yogurt, and then get plenty of veggies and fruit.

    I thought the guideline was 0.8-1.2g /kg a day, not per pound? That is what I have been going by (61 kg, goal of 74 gm protein a day). I am not an athlete by any stretch of the imagination, though, and am doing only light resistance training for muscle maintenance. I am just curious because that is a biiig difference, pound vs kg

    The guideline ratio I used correctly uses pounds. Check out this link to a brief discussion from Alan Aragon which also links to a Helms study. See #3 in this: http://www.alanaragonblog.com/2015/01/06/frequently-asked-questions-about-the-lean-muscle-diet/
    Not that I don't believe you, just trying to clear up the confusion. The poster above posted some links which all use similar amounts but with kg, not sure why some say kg and some say lb.
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,372 Member
    edited April 2016
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    132g is overkill.

    I'm 136 pounds and eat 110g of protein (ok I'm often over anyway) and even that's probably unnecessary.
  • JackieMarie1989jgw
    JackieMarie1989jgw Posts: 230 Member
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    I feel like I am eating a lot of protein at 72. I can't imagine eating 136 gm (I weigh 136 lb)
  • sunnybeaches105
    sunnybeaches105 Posts: 2,831 Member
    Options
    The recommended intake for strength athletes is 1 gram per pound of lean body mass or about 0.8 grams per pound of total body weight. Are you doing heavy strength training? If not you don't need that much.

    As for getting that much it's easy. Focus your diet on things like chicken breast, sirloin, lean pork loin, fish, shellfish, egg whites, cottage cheese, and yogurt, and then get plenty of veggies and fruit.

    I thought the guideline was 0.8-1.2g /kg a day, not per pound? That is what I have been going by (61 kg, goal of 74 gm protein a day). I am not an athlete by any stretch of the imagination, though, and am doing only light resistance training for muscle maintenance. I am just curious because that is a biiig difference, pound vs kg

    The guideline ratio I used correctly uses pounds. Check out this link to a brief discussion from Alan Aragon which also links to a Helms study. See #3 in this: http://www.alanaragonblog.com/2015/01/06/frequently-asked-questions-about-the-lean-muscle-diet/
    Not that I don't believe you, just trying to clear up the confusion. The poster above posted some links which all use similar amounts but with kg, not sure why some say kg and some say lb.

    Read all the links and it should clear it up for you. 1 pound per gram of lean body mass is converted to 2.2 or 2.3 grams per KG of lean body mass. The link I posted and its internal link to the Helms article actually argue for more protein than that in a low calorie diet. To provide the brief version for you here, RDA is too low but the amount many of us eat for heavy strength training while bulking and cutting is probably more than you need.
  • JackieMarie1989jgw
    JackieMarie1989jgw Posts: 230 Member
    Options
    The recommended intake for strength athletes is 1 gram per pound of lean body mass or about 0.8 grams per pound of total body weight. Are you doing heavy strength training? If not you don't need that much.

    As for getting that much it's easy. Focus your diet on things like chicken breast, sirloin, lean pork loin, fish, shellfish, egg whites, cottage cheese, and yogurt, and then get plenty of veggies and fruit.

    I thought the guideline was 0.8-1.2g /kg a day, not per pound? That is what I have been going by (61 kg, goal of 74 gm protein a day). I am not an athlete by any stretch of the imagination, though, and am doing only light resistance training for muscle maintenance. I am just curious because that is a biiig difference, pound vs kg

    The guideline ratio I used correctly uses pounds. Check out this link to a brief discussion from Alan Aragon which also links to a Helms study. See #3 in this: http://www.alanaragonblog.com/2015/01/06/frequently-asked-questions-about-the-lean-muscle-diet/
    Not that I don't believe you, just trying to clear up the confusion. The poster above posted some links which all use similar amounts but with kg, not sure why some say kg and some say lb.

    Read all the links and it should clear it up for you. 1 pound per gram of lean body mass is converted to 2.2 or 2.3 grams per KG of lean body mass. The link I posted and its internal link to the Helms article actually argue for more protein than that in a low calorie diet. To provide the brief version for you here, RDA is too low but the amount many of us eat for heavy strength training while bulking and cutting is probably more than you need.

    Ok, I think I missed the "pounds of lean body mass" point. My body fat % is on the high side of normal for a woman so when only accounting for LBM it would be less than my total weight. That makes sense.
  • sunnybeaches105
    sunnybeaches105 Posts: 2,831 Member
    Options
    The recommended intake for strength athletes is 1 gram per pound of lean body mass or about 0.8 grams per pound of total body weight. Are you doing heavy strength training? If not you don't need that much.

    As for getting that much it's easy. Focus your diet on things like chicken breast, sirloin, lean pork loin, fish, shellfish, egg whites, cottage cheese, and yogurt, and then get plenty of veggies and fruit.

    I thought the guideline was 0.8-1.2g /kg a day, not per pound? That is what I have been going by (61 kg, goal of 74 gm protein a day). I am not an athlete by any stretch of the imagination, though, and am doing only light resistance training for muscle maintenance. I am just curious because that is a biiig difference, pound vs kg

    The guideline ratio I used correctly uses pounds. Check out this link to a brief discussion from Alan Aragon which also links to a Helms study. See #3 in this: http://www.alanaragonblog.com/2015/01/06/frequently-asked-questions-about-the-lean-muscle-diet/
    Not that I don't believe you, just trying to clear up the confusion. The poster above posted some links which all use similar amounts but with kg, not sure why some say kg and some say lb.

    Read all the links and it should clear it up for you. 1 pound per gram of lean body mass is converted to 2.2 or 2.3 grams per KG of lean body mass. The link I posted and its internal link to the Helms article actually argue for more protein than that in a low calorie diet. To provide the brief version for you here, RDA is too low but the amount many of us eat for heavy strength training while bulking and cutting is probably more than you need.

    Ok, I think I missed the "pounds of lean body mass" point. My body fat % is on the high side of normal for a woman so when only accounting for LBM it would be less than my total weight. That makes sense.

    Yes. You have it. The link also mentions that women tend to have a higher body fat percentage than men so some adjustment may be made. Keep in mind that pretty much everything posted here on MFP (whether by me or anyone else) is mostly regurgitated from another source. I put myself in the "educated consumer" category (and that's what most informed users here are - they aren't scientists focusing on health and fitness, though there are exceptions). It then becomes very important to go read those sources so you can make a judgment of whether what someone is saying is soundly evidence based (using the scientific method) or sciency-sounding quackery. The members here do a pretty good job spotting the quackery, but there is also quite a bit of it here on the boards. You also have to read the fine print and make sure what someone is suggesting is right for you and your training regime. Someone training with a periodized heavy lifting program 4-5 days a week is going to have a higher optimum protein intake over someone doing light strength training 2-3 days a week.
  • ForecasterJason
    ForecasterJason Posts: 2,577 Member
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    sexymom04 wrote: »
    mom22dogs wrote: »
    You don't need that much. .8 per lb is enough. I'm 148 and I just talked to my trainer today, and he told me I need about 120-125 grams of protein a day. I do fairly vigorous weight lifting. Not super heavy, but work out hard. And actually to gain muscle, you need to up your carbs. Protein is to retain muscle.

    Ok so I would only need about 100 grams a day then. I don't lift heavy as I just started. And I didn't know about the carbs, good to know. Thanks. So now look into carbs lol
    Even as it is, 100g is probably not even the bare minimum you would need for your goals.

  • sexymom04
    sexymom04 Posts: 263 Member
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    sexymom04 wrote: »
    mom22dogs wrote: »
    You don't need that much. .8 per lb is enough. I'm 148 and I just talked to my trainer today, and he told me I need about 120-125 grams of protein a day. I do fairly vigorous weight lifting. Not super heavy, but work out hard. And actually to gain muscle, you need to up your carbs. Protein is to retain muscle.

    Ok so I would only need about 100 grams a day then. I don't lift heavy as I just started. And I didn't know about the carbs, good to know. Thanks. So now look into carbs lol
    Even as it is, 100g is probably not even the bare minimum you would need for your goals.

    so I would need more than 100g a day? I lift 4 days a week right now and next week my program goes up to 5 days.