Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Space

1100101102103104106»

Replies

  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    Perseid Meteors over Slovakia

    toa3n1t2b6k7.jpg

    Tonight is a good night to see meteors. Comet dust will rain down on planet Earth, streaking through dark skies during the peak of the annual Perseid Meteor Shower. The featured composite image was taken during last year's Perseids from the Poloniny Dark Sky Park in Slovakia.

    The unusual building in the foreground is a planetarium on the grounds of Kolonica Observatory. Although the comet dust particles travel parallel to each other, the resulting shower meteors clearly seem to radiate from a single point on the sky in the eponymous constellation Perseus. The radiant effect is due to perspective, as the parallel tracks appear to converge at a distance, like train tracks.

    The Perseid Meteor Shower is expected to peak after midnight tonight, although unfortunately this year the sky will be brightened by a near full Moon.
  • JustReadTheInstructionsJustReadTheInstructions Posts: 1,730Member Member Posts: 1,730Member Member
    cee134 wrote: »
    Two things:

    1. Go to the NASA website to have your name sent on a chip with the new Mars Rover in 2020 🎫 https://go.nasa.gov/Mars2020pass

    2. Get your eyeballs outside and check out the Perseid Meteor Shower 💫

    awrwo2laz1n4.png

    I feel I should warn you about using your full name on a public website
  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    cee134 wrote: »
    Two things:

    1. Go to the NASA website to have your name sent on a chip with the new Mars Rover in 2020 🎫 https://go.nasa.gov/Mars2020pass

    2. Get your eyeballs outside and check out the Perseid Meteor Shower 💫

    awrwo2laz1n4.png

    I feel I should warn you about using your full name on a public website

    It's ok, it will be on Mars soon.
  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    Moon Phase and Libration, 2019

    https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4442
  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    Supernova Cannon Expels Pulsar J0002

    9bax38nzt2r4.jpg

    What could shoot out a neutron star like a cannon ball? A supernova. About 10,000 years ago, the supernova that created the nebular remnant CTB 1 not only destroyed a massive star but blasted its newly formed neutron star core -- a pulsar -- out into the Milky Way Galaxy. The pulsar, spinning 8.7 times a second, was discovered using downloadable software [email protected] searching through data taken by NASA's orbiting Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory.

    Traveling over 1,000 kilometers per second, the pulsar PSR J0002+6216 (J0002 for short) has already left the supernova remnant CTB 1, and is even fast enough to leave our Galaxy. Pictured, the trail of the pulsar is visible extending to the lower left of the supernova remnant. The featured image is a combination of radio images from the VLA and DRAO radio observatories, as well as data archived from NASA's orbiting IRAS infrared observatory.

    It is well known that supernovas can act as cannons, and even that pulsars can act as cannonballs -- what is not known is how supernovas do it.

  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    Saturn Behind the Moon

    wfgepfg6siya.jpg

    What's that next to the Moon? Saturn. In its monthly trip around the Earth -- and hence Earth's sky -- our Moon passed nearly in front of Sun-orbiting Saturn earlier this week. Actually the Moon passed directly in front of Saturn from the viewpoints of a wide swath of Earth's Southern Hemisphere.

    The featured image from Sydney, Australia captured the pair a few minutes before the eclipse. The image was a single shot lasting only 1/500th of a second, later processed to better highlight both the Moon and Saturn. Since Saturn is nearly opposite the Sun, it can be seen nearly the entire night, starting at sunset, toward the south and east.

    The gibbous Moon was also nearly opposite the Sun, and so also visible nearly the entire night -- it will be full tomorrow night. The Moon will occult Saturn again during every lap it makes around the Earth this year.
  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    The Perseids and the Plough

    vjbdvp6b3kdn.jpg

    Despite interfering moonlight, many denizens of planet Earth were able to watch this year's Perseid meteor shower. This pastoral scene includes local skygazers admiring the shower's brief, heavenly flashes in predawn hours near peak activity on August 13 from Nalati Grassland in Xinjiang, China.

    A composite, the image registers seven frames taken during a two hour span recording Perseid meteor streaks against a starry sky. Centered along the horizon is the Plough, the north's most famous asterism, though some might see the familiar celestial kitchen utensil known as the Big Dipper.

    Perhaps the year's most easily enjoyed meteor shower, Perseid meteors are produced as Earth itself sweeps through dust from periodic comet Swift-Tuttle. The dust particles are vaporized at altitudes of 100 kilometers or so as they plow through the atmosphere at 60 kilometers per second.
  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    Proxima Centauri: The Closest Star

    owxn5dkkkus2.jpg

    Does the closest star to our Sun have planets? No one is sure -- but you can now follow frequent updates of a new search that is taking place during the first few months of 2016. The closest star, Proxima Centauri, is the nearest member of the Alpha Centauri star system. Light takes only 4.24 years to reach us from Proxima Centauri. This small red star, captured in the center of the featured image by the Hubble Space Telescope, is so faint that it was only discovered in 1915 and is only visible through a telescope.

    Telescope-created X-shaped diffraction spikes surround Proxima Centauri, while several stars further out in our Milky Way Galaxy are visible in the background. The brightest star in the Alpha Centauri system is quite similar to our Sun, has been known as long as recorded history, and is the third brightest star in the night sky. The Alpha Centauri system is primarily visible from Earth's Southern Hemisphere.

    Starting back in January 2016, the European Southern Observatory's Pale Red Dot project began investigating slight changes in Proxima Centauri to see if they result from a planet -- possibly an Earth-sized planet. Although unlikely, were a modern civilization found living on a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, its proximity makes it a reasonable possibility that humanity could communicate with them.
  • honeybee__12honeybee__12 Posts: 8,675Member, Premium Member Posts: 8,675Member, Premium Member
    99e8si0p6jnd.png


    ptpwgyhgn3c5.png


    Pluto, taken from the New Horizons
    edited August 16
  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    99e8si0p6jnd.png


    ptpwgyhgn3c5.png


    Pluto, taken from the New Horizons

    That's so awesome that in our lifetime we can see Pluto this close.
  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    The Elephant's Trunk Nebula in Cepheus

    1dekn3atw28k.jpg

    Like an illustration in a galactic Just So Story, the Elephant's Trunk Nebula winds through the emission nebula and young star cluster complex IC 1396, in the high and far off constellation of Cepheus. Also known as vdB 142, the cosmic elephant's trunk is over 20 light-years long.

    This colorful close-up view was recorded through narrow band filters that transmit the light from ionized hydrogen, sulfur, and oxygen atoms in the region. The resulting composite highlights the bright swept-back ridges that outline pockets of cool interstellar dust and gas. Such embedded, dark, tendril-shaped clouds contain the raw material for star formation and hide protostars within.

    Nearly 3,000 light-years distant, the relatively faint IC 1396 complex covers a large region on the sky, spanning over 5 degrees. The dramatic scene spans a 1 degree wide field, about the size of 2 Full Moons.
  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    Hubble’s Portrait of Star’s Gaseous Glow

    qdvmkg9i73ey.jpg

    Although it looks more like an entity seen through a microscope than a telescope, this rounded object, named NGC 2022, is certainly not algae or tiny, blobby jellyfish. Instead, it is a vast orb of gas in space, cast off by an aging star. The star is visible in the orb's center, shining through the gases it formerly held onto for most of its stellar life.

    When stars like the Sun grow advanced in age, they expand and glow red. These so-called red giants then begin to lose their outer layers of material into space. More than half of such a star's mass can be shed in this manner, forming a shell of surrounding gas. At the same time, the star's core shrinks and grows hotter, emitting ultraviolet light that causes the expelled gases to glow.

    This type of object is called, somewhat confusingly, a planetary nebula, though it has nothing to do with planets. The name derives from the rounded, planet-like appearance of these objects in early telescopes.

    NGC 2022 is located in the constellation of Orion (the Hunter).
  • cee134cee134 Posts: 31,821Member Member Posts: 31,821Member Member
    1901 Photograph: The Orion Nebula

    l48izmq1j1sv.jpg

    By the turn of the 20th century advances in photography contributed an important tool for astronomers. Improving photographic materials, long exposures, and new telescope designs produced astronomical images with details not visible at the telescopic eyepiece alone.

    Remarkably recognizable to astrophotographers today, this stunning image of the star forming Orion Nebula was captured in 1901 by American astronomer and telescope designer George Ritchey. The original glass photographic plate, sensitive to green and blue wavelengths, has been digitized and light-to-dark inverted to produce a positive image.

    His hand written notes indicate a 50 minute long exposure that ended at dawn and a reflecting telescope aperture of 24 inches masked to 18 inches to improve the sharpness of the recorded image. Ritchey's plates from over a hundred years ago preserve astronomical data and can still be used for exploring astrophysical processes.
Sign In or Register to comment.