Do you look at calories or Ingredients??

Options
Just wondering, do you buy low cal foods that are full of questionable ingredients and can eat more or good quality ingredients that are maybe higher cal but better for you?
«13

Replies

  • kristinhowell
    kristinhowell Posts: 139 Member
    Options
    Definitely ingredients. But processed foods have their place. If you lean toward organic products, the ingredients are much healthier in general, and they don't usually push for low-cal. And typically, things that are full fat or such are more satiating, and will keep you full for longer anyways.
  • TimothyFish
    TimothyFish Posts: 4,925 Member
    Options
    Why not eat your vegetables and then you can have the best of both worlds?
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,426 Member
    Options
    I don't buy diet versions of products usually. I don't think they are necessarily more "questionable" than anything I did not make from scratch. They just don't taste as good. I want to use my money and calories on good tasting food.

    I use butter instead of margarine. Full fat dairy. Regular condiments.
  • Happyhealthy08
    Happyhealthy08 Posts: 6 Member
    Options
    Why not eat your vegetables and then you can have the best of both worlds?

    hehe oh i do! I was just wondering basically because a lot of posts i see on instagram from people following slimming world or similar keep their calories really low but the food consists of artificially sweetened things, thin breads ect ect. I tend to avoid these kinds of food and stick to wholefoods but these people are losing weight still.. I was just curious.
  • tinkerbellang83
    tinkerbellang83 Posts: 9,070 Member
    Options
    I mostly buy whole food ingredients and cook stuff myself from scratch, I do have the odd low calorie item in my fridge but I don't look at what's in them. If that's something that bothers you there is no reason why you can't seek out more organic or natural foods.

    What matters for weight loss is that your calories in are less than your calories out and that can be made up by whatever combination of foods you want, they don't necessarily need to be low fat/low carb/reduced sugar.
  • Happyhealthy08
    Happyhealthy08 Posts: 6 Member
    Options
    I don't think I've ever run across a food that has questionable ingredients, so not quite sure what you mean there? When I look at nutrition labels I compare calories to grams, meaning how many calories a serving is.

    I did type "rubbish" firstly but ingredients such as aspartame and in general ingredients you cannot recognise :)
  • Anna_137
    Anna_137 Posts: 167 Member
    Options
    I don't buy the 'diet' or 'low cal' version of food. The drop in taste isn't worth the small amount of calories difference.

    E.g. - ready made pasta bake for 600 cals which tastes really nice.
    -'diet range' pasta bake for 450 cals which tastes gross and watery and also weighs less!

    I drink diet soda though. It's definitely worth the saved calories!
  • sardelsa
    sardelsa Posts: 9,812 Member
    Options
    I actively don't seek out diet or low cal foods, they are just not worth wasting my cals on. But yes I do read labels frequently. If you are unsure of the ingredients you can always look them up, vitamins and minerals can sometimes sound a little funky to those not in the science field (ex: niacinamide, pyridoxine hydrochloride, etc)
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,371 Member
    Options
    Typically calories and serving size. I don't really look at ingredients but I usually stick to 'not overly processed' processed foods (pasta sauce, tortillas, pasta, crackers, yogurt etc).
  • dragon_girl26
    dragon_girl26 Posts: 2,187 Member
    edited March 2017
    Options
    I typically buy what tastes good to me, though I do pay attention to the calorie amounts. If it's a small amount of something for a larger amount of calories, I may not get it solely because the calories aren't worth it.
    As for ingredients, I buy a lot of whole foods, but I don't shy away from something just because it has ingredients I don't recognize. Not knowing what an ingredient is doesn't automatically mean it is bad for me. If I'm really worried about it, I can always Google the ingredient first.
  • Chadxx
    Chadxx Posts: 1,199 Member
    Options
    Why not eat your vegetables and then you can have the best of both worlds?

    I wouldn't limit it to just vegetables. I would certainly include lean meats, fresh fruits, etc. but I absolutely agree otherwise.
  • inertiastrength
    inertiastrength Posts: 2,343 Member
    Options
    I look at both, but more calories and macros. I really don't care about the ingredients that much since I don't have to look up ingredients to food that is nutritionally dense. I know if I'm eating crappy food so there's no mystery if I feel like crap after eating something particularly nutritionally void.
  • happysherri
    happysherri Posts: 1,360 Member
    Options
    Both. Depends on what it is but I still drink diet soda sometimes and I ate a pop tart the other day - and I know there are ingredients in there I can't pronounce. :smiley:
  • missh1967
    missh1967 Posts: 661 Member
    Options
    Both. Depends on what it is but I still drink diet soda sometimes and I ate a pop tart the other day - and I know there are ingredients in there I can't pronounce. :smiley:

    Now I want a cherry Poptart. mmmmmmmmm