Welcome to the new Community design. We know there are some big changes to get used to as well some challenges and bugs. Please check out our post about New Updates To The Community as well as Outstanding Bugs. We will continue to collect feedback and bug issues and will work to make improvements.

Trying to find a puppy and so frustrated!

Francl27
Francl27 Posts: 26,373 Member
Has anyone else noticed this? I'm all for rescuing, but frankly, I can understand why it's so much easier for people to just go to a pet store and buy a puppy sometimes...

I've been looking around on Petfinder and for the puppies I'm interested in, I just don't live in the right county to adopt and they all prefer local people, or their application links are down, or the rescues want 3 home visits or something else equally ridiculous... It's getting really frustrating!

My other (and probably only) option at this point is to get a puppy from a breeder... but there aren't many breeders for the breed I would be the most interested in (newfies) in the area, so I'm looking at driving probably at least 2-3 hours and spending 5x as much money (and I haven't even contacted any yet... so I have no idea what loops I'm going to have to go through to actually bring a puppy home either).

Bleh! I'm not in a rush or anything (I have a 13yo dog who is very picky about the dogs he can tolerate, and a 16yo cat), and I REALLY don't want to support puppy mills (or random backyard breeders who are just in for the money), but sheesh, it's really frustrating and sometimes it seems like the only available option.

What's everyone's experience in getting puppies? The only reason I'm not really considering adults is because I have children and I admit I would be a bit nervous with a dog I don't know anything about... at least I can train a puppy from scratch (but I admit that I find the puppy stage extremely stressful).
«134

Replies

  • JoJosAnatomymfp
    JoJosAnatomymfp Posts: 178 Member
    I like the 3 home visit option. Buy from a breeder and you could quickly realise your current dog doesn't mix well and you are surrendering your new puppy. Rescue a dog and you have the support of the service to assist you settling the new dog and your current one.

    I'm from Ireland. Iv two dogs. One rescued and one bought. We had great support from the rescue centre mixing our too and ensuring they got on well. I think it's great they do the home visits. It's what's best for the new doggy and your family after all. It may be inconvenient for you, but rescue dogs haven't usually had the best start in life so of course the service wants to ensure you and your family can provide it with a forever home.

    Good luck on your search.
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,373 Member
    I like the 3 home visit option. Buy from a breeder and you could quickly realise your current dog doesn't mix well and you are surrendering your new puppy. Rescue a dog and you have the support of the service to assist you settling the new dog and your current one.

    I'm from Ireland. Iv two dogs. One rescued and one bought. We had great support from the rescue centre mixing our too and ensuring they got on well. I think it's great they do the home visits. It's what's best for the new doggy and your family after all. It may be inconvenient for you, but rescue dogs haven't usually had the best start in life so of course the service wants to ensure you and your family can provide it with a forever home.

    Good luck on your search.

    The problem with the home visits though is that it's another reason why I can't adopt the puppies I find online... I'm out of their 'range'.

    My current dog was a puppy rescue, and it was very easy actually, all I had to do was fill in an application and they didn't care that I lived 2 hours away.. but that was 13 years ago!
  • JoJosAnatomymfp
    JoJosAnatomymfp Posts: 178 Member
    Ring them and see what they say. Most animal rescues in Ireland are overcrowded anyways. With your past history of rescue too, that should stand to you too hopefully.
  • RoxieDawn
    RoxieDawn Posts: 15,491 Member
    Your choice for what type of dog or puppy that suits your home should always be considered. For me there is not one way or wrong way to bring a new family member into my home. I have 3 dogs and 2 cats.

    I drove to another state to get my last chocolate lab puppy. She is 3 now. I actually drove there way before the litter was born to meet the breeder and the momma and stud. I went back after they were born and ready to be released to new homes and picked her up. My silver lab came from a breeder 1 hour a way, same scenario.

    My my black lab, was adopted as a puppy from a homeless shelter for men. This shelter just happens to be a center one of our non-profit client provide subsidies for.. This was a situation where I took her on the spot, they were gonna take her to the pound the next day which she may or may not have been euthanized before getting adopted.

    Good luck and I hope you come back and post a pic of your new baby when you find him/her!

  • pinuplove
    pinuplove Posts: 12,903 Member
    All of our dogs have been 'happy accidents' or recuses, but we've never gone into dog ownersip with a specific breed preference. One was a Labrador retriever mix. His mom was a stray who moved her litter in under our house (he was the best dog ever!) Our neighbor adopted his mom and had her spayed (always spay and neuter your pets, people!) One was a golden retriever mix puppy from a local rescue organization, and our most recent dog was from another stray who had a litter by our house (yes I'm a sucker!) He's pure mutt, even the vet just listed his breed as 'mixed' lol

    I completely understand the desire to raise and train from puppyhood while you have kids at home in particular. I assume you've looked into breed-specific rescues? Sometimes they even help with transportation costs. Finding a puppy of a specific breed from a rescue organization is a tall order though. Puppies they have, but rarely of pure breed or 100% known origin. These little guys aren't with a rescue because they had the most auspicious beginning usually :disappointed:

    I have strong convictions against supporting puppy mills and backyard breeders as well. Hopefully you can find a reputable breeder if you decide to go that route, but yes, it will be expensive. I hope you find the puppy that's right for your family!
  • tinkerbellang83
    tinkerbellang83 Posts: 8,933 Member
    Francl27 wrote: »

    I've been looking around on Petfinder and for the puppies I'm interested in, I just don't live in the right county to adopt and they all prefer local people, or their application links are down, or the rescues want 3 home visits or something else equally ridiculous... It's getting really frustrating!
    When you take into account that people have been taking advantage of rescue centres to find dogs for fighting, etc 3 home visits isn't ridiculous, it's in the dogs best interest particularly if they've come from a neglectful home in the first place.
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,428 Member
    We got our last dog from an animal shelter in the next state over when he was 4 months old. He was on his last week there before he would have been euthanized to make room at the shelter. He was not house trained- or any kind of trained. He was energetic. He chewed on stuff a lot at first. It was a lot of work for some time. We had him about 11 years before he died.
    Prior to that I had only had only adopted adult dogs. I never had any issue with their behavior toward me or anyone else. To me they seemed easier.
    I would probably adopt an adult dog over a puppy again. Depends on the dog and their situation more than the age though.
  • RachelElser
    RachelElser Posts: 1,049 Member
    you may also want to look on the FB garage sale stuff- there are so many animals there, it breaks my heart. I PURPOSELY got one cat, and now I have four! The other three just kinda happened. or ask around at work if someone knows of a puppy that needs a good home.
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,373 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    I went to the dog pound once a week for a year until I found the right one. It was probably one of the most meaningful things I ever did in my life, in a positive sense. Doggy turned out to be the love of my life.

    So the answer I would offer is: Patience.

    The problem is that the local pound is tiny.. and again, with kids I'm nervous about getting some random adult dog (we had to rehome a dog because he snapped at them when they were 2.. which probably isn't too great on my rescue application either).

    Moot point for now anyway because my dog would probably not accept an adult dog, and I'd be nervous for my cat too (that's why I've only been looking at puppies).
  • klkarlen
    klkarlen Posts: 4,366 Member
    My daughter recently got a rescue dog (barely a year old) from a post on petfinder, the dog was two states away. The group had someone do one home visit to my daughter's apartment, gave it the thumbs up, and arranged a transport chain to get her down here. . .

    Now, this dog is totally not of the correct temperament to be left home alone in an apartment for 9 hours a day, which the rescue said she was, and we didn't want to return her to a rescue that was that lax in getting a good placement for the dog, so now she lives with me and my two other rescue dogs that I have had for 5 years now, and the adjustment has been rocky, as I attempt to train a dog to be a house dog and puppy-proof every damned thing because she is a terrorist. Cute as a button, and fine when I am home, but those hours at work. . . I never know what I am going to come home to.

    Long story short, a good rescue will make sure the dog is a good fit, which is why they make it harder to just adopt.

    I also recommend patience, the right pup will come along at the right time for you and your family.
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,373 Member
    klkarlen wrote: »
    My daughter recently got a rescue dog (barely a year old) from a post on petfinder, the dog was two states away. The group had someone do one home visit to my daughter's apartment, gave it the thumbs up, and arranged a transport chain to get her down here. . .

    Now, this dog is totally not of the correct temperament to be left home alone in an apartment for 9 hours a day, which the rescue said she was, and we didn't want to return her to a rescue that was that lax in getting a good placement for the dog, so now she lives with me and my two other rescue dogs that I have had for 5 years now, and the adjustment has been rocky, as I attempt to train a dog to be a house dog and puppy-proof every damned thing because she is a terrorist. Cute as a button, and fine when I am home, but those hours at work. . . I never know what I am going to come home to.

    Long story short, a good rescue will make sure the dog is a good fit, which is why they make it harder to just adopt.

    I also recommend patience, the right pup will come along at the right time for you and your family.

    The rescue was probably using crates, to be fair, lol.
  • klkarlen
    klkarlen Posts: 4,366 Member
    @Francl27 Did you also try Adopt A Pet site? There are 11 newfie pups using a Nationwide search (since I didn't know your geographic location.
  • klkarlen
    klkarlen Posts: 4,366 Member
    Francl27 wrote: »
    klkarlen wrote: »
    My daughter recently got a rescue dog (barely a year old) from a post on petfinder, the dog was two states away. The group had someone do one home visit to my daughter's apartment, gave it the thumbs up, and arranged a transport chain to get her down here. . .

    Now, this dog is totally not of the correct temperament to be left home alone in an apartment for 9 hours a day, which the rescue said she was, and we didn't want to return her to a rescue that was that lax in getting a good placement for the dog, so now she lives with me and my two other rescue dogs that I have had for 5 years now, and the adjustment has been rocky, as I attempt to train a dog to be a house dog and puppy-proof every damned thing because she is a terrorist. Cute as a button, and fine when I am home, but those hours at work. . . I never know what I am going to come home to.

    Long story short, a good rescue will make sure the dog is a good fit, which is why they make it harder to just adopt.

    I also recommend patience, the right pup will come along at the right time for you and your family.

    The rescue was probably using crates, to be fair, lol.

    She was crated in the apartment, would cry and bark for hours, annoying the upstairs neighbor, who would pound on the floor, which upset the dog even more, to the point of explosive bowel movements in the crate. . .the poor dog. . . we put her in expensive doggy day care which helped some, but there was still weekends, and trips to the store, basically she could not be left alone. We did everything possible, she is a jack russel cross, and needs lots of exercise (I live on a horse farm) and other dogs to play with. So my setup is perfect for her. Now she just needs to learn boundaries.
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,373 Member
    klkarlen wrote: »
    @Francl27 Did you also try Adopt A Pet site? There are 11 newfie pups using a Nationwide search (since I didn't know your geographic location.

    I didn't know that site! I actually found a couple pups I like... but holding off until my husband is completely on board. But thanks, I'll definitely use it when we are ready!
    klkarlen wrote: »
    Francl27 wrote: »
    klkarlen wrote: »
    My daughter recently got a rescue dog (barely a year old) from a post on petfinder, the dog was two states away. The group had someone do one home visit to my daughter's apartment, gave it the thumbs up, and arranged a transport chain to get her down here. . .

    Now, this dog is totally not of the correct temperament to be left home alone in an apartment for 9 hours a day, which the rescue said she was, and we didn't want to return her to a rescue that was that lax in getting a good placement for the dog, so now she lives with me and my two other rescue dogs that I have had for 5 years now, and the adjustment has been rocky, as I attempt to train a dog to be a house dog and puppy-proof every damned thing because she is a terrorist. Cute as a button, and fine when I am home, but those hours at work. . . I never know what I am going to come home to.

    Long story short, a good rescue will make sure the dog is a good fit, which is why they make it harder to just adopt.

    I also recommend patience, the right pup will come along at the right time for you and your family.

    The rescue was probably using crates, to be fair, lol.

    She was crated in the apartment, would cry and bark for hours, annoying the upstairs neighbor, who would pound on the floor, which upset the dog even more, to the point of explosive bowel movements in the crate. . .the poor dog. . . we put her in expensive doggy day care which helped some, but there was still weekends, and trips to the store, basically she could not be left alone. We did everything possible, she is a jack russel cross, and needs lots of exercise (I live on a horse farm) and other dogs to play with. So my setup is perfect for her. Now she just needs to learn boundaries.

    Oh yeah, terriers are rough. It's one of the things that make it hard for me too, I'm pretty specific about the breeds of dog I don't want. I want a breed that will go on walks/hikes with me (so it needs to be large) but has an average energy level otherwise, and I'm also shallow and want a dog that I like the look of.
    jtegirl1 wrote: »
    I am a long time volunteer with a rescue. If the rescues are out of range for a home visit you could ask them to connect with a reputable local rescue that would be willing to do the home visit for them. We did that often.

    Also, remember that when you get a puppy, you still don't know exactly what their temperament will be once they are fully matured, which typically doesn't happen until about a year. Our director didn't like adopting puppies out because we would often get them returned. A one year to 1.5 yr old dog or older is a good bet because you will know their temperament. Whether they're going to be hyper or couch potatoes or somewhere in between. That's hard to discern in a puppy.

    Honestly, as cute as puppies are, I would never get one. I will always go for about a year and 1/2 or older so I will know their true personality.

    Yeah honestly I'd rather go for 1-1.5yo as well, but it would have to be from a rescue that actually knows their dog... not the pound. But my main worry really is that we'd end up with a totally out of control 1.5yo dog that has had no training whatsoever and would be harder to handle than a puppy.
  • klkarlen
    klkarlen Posts: 4,366 Member
    edited March 2017
    Francl27 wrote: »
    Oh yeah, terriers are rough. It's one of the things that make it hard for me too, I'm pretty specific about the breeds of dog I don't want. I want a breed that will go on walks/hikes with me (so it needs to be large) but has an average energy level otherwise, and I'm also shallow and want a dog that I like the look of.

    LOL - well for my whole life I have said "I'll never own a JRT, they are football shaped for a reason", and the powers that be laughed and said "here you go!" She was posted as a Brittany cross, and the photos and videos didn't make the JRT part apparent, it was not until I put her in my truck (I had the last leg of the transport chain) that I realized that she might be a small part Brittany, but not by much.

    You might want to try http://petharbor.com/ also, some rescues and shelters use that instead of Petfinder.

    Good luck with your puppy hunt.
  • JeromeBarry1
    JeromeBarry1 Posts: 10,185 Member
    edited March 2017
    On getting a dog: My daughter wanted a dog. We first looked in the city animal shelter. She didn't see one she wanted. Then we looked to the Humane Society. They deigned to offer us the provisional responsibility of renting a beast pursuant to the terms of a mandatory contract which left the Humane Society with the liberty of unannounced inspections and seizure of the beast at their own discretion. Then we found a puppy mill. From the puppy mill in Dallas we got the dog, and the dog is a fine dog.

    About that puppy mill: I had to drive into a 'disadvantaged' neighborhood close in to downtown south of the Trinity River. The roads were in need of repair. The modest houses were uniformly in disrepair. Yards were grass-less or overgrown. The house at the address of the puppy mill was clean, in good repair, recently painted, with a neatly trimmed front yard. Clearly, the lady selling the puppies (a mix of several Spaniel breeds) made a nice income from her product. I got an eye-opening education on the topic.


    (And my little fella is fixed)
  • Kollane
    Kollane Posts: 45 Member
    I have two "rescues" - one from shelter, other from owner, who couldn't handle her. The one from the owner is purebred and I've had such support from the breeder - I can ask her anything and she'll help as much as she can. She's also dog trainer and can offer help, though we do different sports (our dogs do SAR, her's tracking). The mix from shelter is nice, but there's no help after we adopted her. She also has her problems, probably to do with not being socialized properly when puppy (I got her at 8 months) and her ancestors gave her nervous/easily excited temperament (malinois mix, that should say something), so she has trouble calming down, is dog reactive, was destructive when younger, is still extremely active at 7 years. She's lovely, but would be a huge pain in the rear for an inexperienced or lazy owner - yet, she was advertised as calm and nice, just untrained puppy.

    My next puppy will be from a breeder and we're going to drive 16h and back for him. Why breeder? Because that way I'll know what to expect - looks, temperament and health. The breed isn't so rare here that I couldn't get one from my own country, but I don't like the ones bred here. I'll be living with that dog for 10+ years, I'll rather go the extra mile and get one that suits my life.
  • tapwaters
    tapwaters Posts: 428 Member
    Don't get it from a breeder. Millions of dogs die every year because people have this insane notion that if they get a dog from a breeder they will "know what to expect." No, you don't. Every dog is different, even within their breeds. When you buy a dog from a breeder you are perpetuating the death of millions of dogs and the unnecessary confinement of millions more. Health, temperament, life expectancy are all completely individual and not guaranteed when you go to a breeder any more than when you get a dog from a shelter who will die or not have a family. Stop perpetuating cruelty, exploitation, and the overpopulation of animals. It isn't necessary.

    The shelters and rescues make visits to make sure the animal will get along with the animals and humans in the home and reduce the likelihood of a mismatch. Further, just because a rescue is far away isn't a good reason because you literally mentioned driving hours to go to a breeder. Why would you trust a breeder that you can throw money at, but bemoan the rescue that actually wants to make sure that your family is a good fit for this dog? A life that you will be responsible for loving and caring for for years.
    http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/why-breeding-dogs-is-a-problem-even-if-the-breeder-is-reputable/