Lying to your doctor

124

Replies

  • upoffthemat
    upoffthemat Posts: 679 Member
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not to turn this into a political post, but the AMA has decided that guns and gun ownership represent a HEALTH hazard and they are trying to get the member doctors to preach the politically correct stance of 'guns are the DEBIL'.

    Neither my GP nor his nurse has asked me this question but if they do, I will simply answer that it is none of their business.

    I was asked once and that was my answer. My doctor was fine with the answer
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,426 Member
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    Lounmoun wrote: »
    I just read an article that said 64% of people surveyed admitted that they have lied to (or withheld info from) their doctor. Is it just me, or does this sound like the stupidest thing ever? Why pay a doctor's fee but then not give them honest information? I mean, if you are going to lie, just don't go, right?

    Well, it doesn't make sense to me but it is their business and relationship with their physician.
    Maybe a number of people don't feel they can be open with their doctor- someone they see for a few minutes- about everything but still need help.

    You're right, maybe many don't. Maybe many are stuck in a specific form of healthcare they don't want but they can't afford an improvement and/or they're on HMOs and if they change this one doctor, they have to lose two others they really like, and/or start all over again from scratch with histories and so on. Maybe they're being held hostage by a doctor they can't logistically and financially "fire" whom the know will refuse them a recommendation on some technicality or other unless they play their cards very, very carefully. Maybe they've been seeking help but they KNOW the doctor, and probably any next doctor they were to hire after firing this one if it were possible, would still sneer down his/her nose and simply say "go on a diet and work out" rather than realistically trying to help with health issues that may have nothing whatsoever to do with weight or exercise habits, but could happen to anybody. So they "!!!lie!!! Lying dummy-dums! Peh!!!" to their doctors about one thing or another...to get some sort of help rather than a sneer and rolled eyes. I mean, just maybe, for a few of these !!!!!!!!!!!!liars!!!!!!!!!!! You never know, right?

    I know I recently was over a barrel trying desperately to help my child with thyroid issues. Looking at his (just slightly) overweight belly, the endo we "had" to go to due to our HMO (or else change the entire practice and ALL our doctors - mind you, my son has special needs and has A LOT of doctors) informed us that being overweight causes hypothroidism (um...?) and sneeringly told me that after I got my child to lose weight, he might consider medicating him. For. A. Physical. Damned. Issue. I was very honest with this doctor. I told him I felt the weight issue (tiny as it was, and I mean that literally, tiny...just barely over that BMI line) was a combination of my son seeming hungrier recently, AND physically being unable to stand up out of bed some days or managing to do his school day but then collapsing at home into a half-coma of sleep. Should have lied about that first part but who wants to be a !!!!!!!!!!!liar!!!!!!!!!! just to get their child some help for the physical torture he's going through, right?

    Maybe some people realize they're very much over a barrel with the appalling state of healthcare today, assemblyline-format doctoring and they know the personality of the doctor they're stuck with so they fudge something so they can be helped in some way. So they can have some relief of suffering. Then again, maybe the doctor's perfectly nice...well, except for those little sideways slams she manages to get in about what an apparent fat pig the patient is and how s/he is "killing him/herself," etc., etc. and the patient just wants to get the hell through the appointment and back out the door without having to be scolded like a child and basically being made to feel like a hopeless, disgusting person. Now these potential scenarios are not definite, of course, but I'd wager my left ovary that things like this are a huge part of what's behind many, many people's "lying" to the doctor they only have to see "for a few minutes," peh, silly dummies, eh?

    It's easy to look down at others if we don't bother walking in their shoes for a few minutes.

    You and others bring up specific reasonable scenarios about why some might omit information or exaggerate information. There is a lot wrong with health care and the issues that surround it.
    I think what someone chooses to share or not share with a doctor is their business. I wasn't looking down on anyone with my post and I hope it didn't come across that way.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not a firearms owner, just wondering what the tie-in could possibly be here.

    Here's a piece about a FL law that discusses the underlying reasons:
    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/08/doctors-cant-ask-about-guns/375566/
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    I can't say I've ever been asked if I own a firearm.

    I haven't either. I looked it up because I didn't believe it was a thing, but I guess it is.
  • SusanMFindlay
    SusanMFindlay Posts: 1,804 Member
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not a firearms owner, just wondering what the tie-in could possibly be here.

    Presumably, the follow-up question to a "yes" should be "Have you taken a gun safety course?" Assuming the answer to that question is "yes", move along. Guns in households where people haven't learned how to handle them safely are certainly a health issue.
  • LowCarb4Me2016
    LowCarb4Me2016 Posts: 575 Member
    Maybe its just where I live and they consider it redundant? There are a lot of hunters in my area.
  • ccrdragon
    ccrdragon Posts: 3,365 Member
    Guns in households where people haven't learned how to handle them safely are certainly a health issue.

    So are most ordinary household items - you'd be amazed by the damage that a casually tossed dinner plate can cause.
  • kaizaku
    kaizaku Posts: 1,039 Member
    Those are the same people who say doctors don't give the right medicine and complain. Can't stand those type of people.
  • LAWoman72
    LAWoman72 Posts: 2,846 Member
    edited April 2017
    newmeadow wrote: »
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not a firearms owner, just wondering what the tie-in could possibly be here.

    Presumably, the follow-up question to a "yes" should be "Have you taken a gun safety course?" Assuming the answer to that question is "yes", move along. Guns in households where people haven't learned how to handle them safely are certainly a health issue.

    So are steak knives with habitually drunk paranoid boyfriends in the household prone to making hysterical and baseless accusations about infidelity.

    So are common baseball bats when personality disordered teens live in the household who keep being returned to mother and stepdad after being sent to juvie for 48 hours for ripping the doors off the hinges and kicking the cat.

    Well, you probably can't spray a group of people with steak knives and kill 10 of them in 10 seconds this way unless you're VERY talented (ditto baseball bats), and on top of this obvious fact, I have zero interest in guns and would not have one in my household...yet even I, a crunchy crazy lib who's oddly a bit more frightened of spraying gunfire than a steak knife, agree that if we are to have patients grilled on home safety procedures...that is going to get more than a bit cumbersome. I'll be honest, I think it is still the patient's right not to say, "Yes, doc, I have X amount of firearms in my home...these are what type they are...my kids have taken a gun safety course..." etc. This stuff DOES get intrusive, and it's dumb, because YES, people will lie even if (ironically) on principle, to wit: "The doctor has no right to intrude on my personal life, so I'm just going to answer any way I want to."

    OTOH, I have been asked about a gajillion times by doctors whether I have smoke detectors in my home. I don't wander around with a cigar in my shirtsleeve or anything so I'm not sure where that's coming from but I don't think being asked about guns (now that I understand the reasoning) is any weirder than other (sometimes intrusive) safety "questions" doctors nail patients with. Again, sometimes, that's just personal and people won't want to answer. Another point for the !!!liars!!! team and yet another good point as to why !!!!lying!!! isn't always a matter of some giant diabetic shoveling in donuts and then expressing shock at a lethal FBS reading.
  • SusanMFindlay
    SusanMFindlay Posts: 1,804 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not a firearms owner, just wondering what the tie-in could possibly be here.

    Presumably, the follow-up question to a "yes" should be "Have you taken a gun safety course?" Assuming the answer to that question is "yes", move along. Guns in households where people haven't learned how to handle them safely are certainly a health issue.

    So are steak knives with habitually drunk paranoid boyfriends in the household prone to making hysterical and baseless accusations about infidelity.

    So are common baseball bats when personality disordered teens live in the household who keep being returned to mother and stepdad after being sent to juvie for 48 hours for ripping the doors off the hinges and kicking the cat.

    Yes, and I'd assume that there are questions getting at the possibility of habitually drunk paranoid boyfriends or personality disordered teens. ("Do you fear anyone that you interact with on a regular basis?", for example.) Just as I'd expect a question about knives being kept out of reach of young children. Doctors tend to have *really* long lists of questions looking to establish potential health risks. And if I have to answer a stupid question about whether or not my 18 month old can stack blocks horizontally*, I don't see why it's a bad thing to check whether or not gun safety is a thing in households with guns. You want to say "none of your business"? Fine. No harm in them asking.

    *How do you even stack something HORIZONTALLY? That's not stacking! It's a stupid question! So, with the first kid I answered an honest "I don't know" and they wanted to test him for developmental issues he doesn't have. With the second kid, we're just saying "yes". :tongue:
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not a firearms owner, just wondering what the tie-in could possibly be here.

    Presumably, the follow-up question to a "yes" should be "Have you taken a gun safety course?" Assuming the answer to that question is "yes", move along. Guns in households where people haven't learned how to handle them safely are certainly a health issue.

    So are steak knives with habitually drunk paranoid boyfriends in the household prone to making hysterical and baseless accusations about infidelity.

    So are common baseball bats when personality disordered teens live in the household who keep being returned to mother and stepdad after being sent to juvie for 48 hours for ripping the doors off the hinges and kicking the cat.

    Yes, and I'd assume that there are questions getting at the possibility of habitually drunk paranoid boyfriends or personality disordered teens. ("Do you fear anyone that you interact with on a regular basis?", for example.) Just as I'd expect a question about knives being kept out of reach of young children. Doctors tend to have *really* long lists of questions looking to establish potential health risks. And if I have to answer a stupid question about whether or not my 18 month old can stack blocks horizontally*, I don't see why it's a bad thing to check whether or not gun safety is a thing in households with guns. You want to say "none of your business"? Fine. No harm in them asking.

    *How do you even stack something HORIZONTALLY? That's not stacking! It's a stupid question! So, with the first kid I answered an honest "I don't know" and they wanted to test him for developmental issues he doesn't have. With the second kid, we're just saying "yes". :tongue:

    Heh, I'd say "apparently the developmental difficulties are mine, as I have no idea what horizontal stacking might be!" I suppose that wouldn't really be helpful, though. ;-)

    (And I am with you, that question would confuse me too.)
  • LowCarb4Me2016
    LowCarb4Me2016 Posts: 575 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not a firearms owner, just wondering what the tie-in could possibly be here.

    Presumably, the follow-up question to a "yes" should be "Have you taken a gun safety course?" Assuming the answer to that question is "yes", move along. Guns in households where people haven't learned how to handle them safely are certainly a health issue.

    So are steak knives with habitually drunk paranoid boyfriends in the household prone to making hysterical and baseless accusations about infidelity.

    So are common baseball bats when personality disordered teens live in the household who keep being returned to mother and stepdad after being sent to juvie for 48 hours for ripping the doors off the hinges and kicking the cat.

    Yes, and I'd assume that there are questions getting at the possibility of habitually drunk paranoid boyfriends or personality disordered teens. ("Do you fear anyone that you interact with on a regular basis?", for example.) Just as I'd expect a question about knives being kept out of reach of young children. Doctors tend to have *really* long lists of questions looking to establish potential health risks. And if I have to answer a stupid question about whether or not my 18 month old can stack blocks horizontally*, I don't see why it's a bad thing to check whether or not gun safety is a thing in households with guns. You want to say "none of your business"? Fine. No harm in them asking.

    *How do you even stack something HORIZONTALLY? That's not stacking! It's a stupid question! So, with the first kid I answered an honest "I don't know" and they wanted to test him for developmental issues he doesn't have. With the second kid, we're just saying "yes". :tongue:

    My girls and I are all asked if all of our needs are met at home and if we are being abused. Presumably if someone is answering honestly, the gun thing might come up.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,171 Member
    I can't say I've ever been asked if I own a firearm.

    Neither have I, except by my Psychiatrist which is understandable.
  • 3rdof7sisters
    3rdof7sisters Posts: 486 Member
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not a firearms owner, just wondering what the tie-in could possibly be here.

    Presumably, the follow-up question to a "yes" should be "Have you taken a gun safety course?" Assuming the answer to that question is "yes", move along. Guns in households where people haven't learned how to handle them safely are certainly a health issue.

    Who determines whether or not the person has gone through a gun safety class or whether or not there is an adequate gun safe in the home? Why ask the question in the first place.
  • LowCarb4Me2016
    LowCarb4Me2016 Posts: 575 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    I can't say I've ever been asked if I own a firearm.

    Neither have I, except by my Psychiatrist which is understandable.

    Even my therapist didn't ask about guns. Hmm...maybe they just assume people here are likely to have one.
  • Aarjono
    Aarjono Posts: 228 Member
    I don't lie to my Dr, but my Dr dismisses me because I'm obese. I've gotten lectures for *not* having high blood pressure or diabetes or high cholesterol because of my weight.
  • LAWoman72
    LAWoman72 Posts: 2,846 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not a firearms owner, just wondering what the tie-in could possibly be here.

    Presumably, the follow-up question to a "yes" should be "Have you taken a gun safety course?" Assuming the answer to that question is "yes", move along. Guns in households where people haven't learned how to handle them safely are certainly a health issue.

    So are steak knives with habitually drunk paranoid boyfriends in the household prone to making hysterical and baseless accusations about infidelity.

    So are common baseball bats when personality disordered teens live in the household who keep being returned to mother and stepdad after being sent to juvie for 48 hours for ripping the doors off the hinges and kicking the cat.

    Yes, and I'd assume that there are questions getting at the possibility of habitually drunk paranoid boyfriends or personality disordered teens. ("Do you fear anyone that you interact with on a regular basis?", for example.) Just as I'd expect a question about knives being kept out of reach of young children. Doctors tend to have *really* long lists of questions looking to establish potential health risks. And if I have to answer a stupid question about whether or not my 18 month old can stack blocks horizontally*, I don't see why it's a bad thing to check whether or not gun safety is a thing in households with guns. You want to say "none of your business"? Fine. No harm in them asking.

    *How do you even stack something HORIZONTALLY? That's not stacking! It's a stupid question! So, with the first kid I answered an honest "I don't know" and they wanted to test him for developmental issues he doesn't have. With the second kid, we're just saying "yes". :tongue:

    My girls and I are all asked if all of our needs are met at home and if we are being abused. Presumably if someone is answering honestly, the gun thing might come up.

    I have never been asked this particular question and would be shocked if I were, but I have been asked other "safety" questions - i.e. smoke detectors (I mentioned this above); whether we use car seats for our children (WTH??? "Do you keep your children in car seats?" "No, we put them in the trunk" - OMG, I wouldn't dare, I'd be worried about CPS being called but damn it's tempting sometimes to answer "Are you a horrible, ignorant parent? Just checking" questions sarcastically), and so on.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,171 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    I can't say I've ever been asked if I own a firearm.

    Neither have I, except by my Psychiatrist which is understandable.

    Even my therapist didn't ask about guns. Hmm...maybe they just assume people here are likely to have one.

    I am in a big hunting area too. It was part of the "are you safe at home" conversation. Since I went to her for depression and suicidal thoughts, it made sense to me.
  • LAWoman72
    LAWoman72 Posts: 2,846 Member
    edited April 2017
    LAWoman72 wrote: »
    In America, the American Medical Association wants doctors to ask clinical patients to disclose information about their ownership of firearms.

    What???

    Why?

    Not a firearms owner, just wondering what the tie-in could possibly be here.

    Presumably, the follow-up question to a "yes" should be "Have you taken a gun safety course?" Assuming the answer to that question is "yes", move along. Guns in households where people haven't learned how to handle them safely are certainly a health issue.

    Who determines whether or not the person has gone through a gun safety class or whether or not there is an adequate gun safe in the home? Why ask the question in the first place.

    I'd guess it's a case of CYA. If a doctor suspects either abuse, neglect or dangerous conditions, I believe (there must be specifics to this) she is required to report these issues to the authorities. If she doesn't, and something terrible happens, I think the doctor could be taken to task legally for it.

    A doctor asking a woman with a black eye whether she's abused in the home and being told "no, doctor, I'm just clumsy" almost certainly knows she's being lied to but has at least done her legal duty in asking.

    I'll bet sometimes, doctors feel stupid even asking these questions, and feel intrusive, but also think they'd better CTA.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,171 Member
    Aarjono wrote: »
    I don't lie to my Dr, but my Dr dismisses me because I'm obese. I've gotten lectures for *not* having high blood pressure or diabetes or high cholesterol because of my weight.

    I had that too. I switched to an APNP and finally feel like I have a partner in my health care rather than someone on a pedestal looking down at me.