Stationary bike question???

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Hi. I have a very cheap srationary bike which I just spent 10 mins on at 25km & it says I burned 60 cals. (Based on time & speed) I would consider that a moderate pace. MFP says 10 mins at mod pace is 100 cals. Which would be more accurate? What would you do?

Ps. Im 194 lbs & 5'1

Replies

  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,809 Member
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    In truth and assuming you aren't very fit I would say the MFP estimate is very exaggerated for you.

    I'm a 100+ mile cyclist and very fit, producing more power than average, and 600 cals / hour isn't too hard for me. What I would call moderate pace (multi hour speed) is closer to 500 cals/hr though.

    I think your bike's estimate of 360/hr is far more reasonable.
  • Sunshine6909
    Sunshine6909 Posts: 108 Member
    edited June 2017
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    For some reason my thinking was if a lighter person & a heavier person exerted the same amount of effort that the heavier person would burn more calories because they have added weight. Don't know where that line of thinking came from & it has now started a physics conversation in my house. Oh dear! :-)
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,809 Member
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    Remember seated cycling isn't a weight bearing exercise.

    So for walking or running yes weight is a significant factor.

    Indoor cycling with no stop/starts or hills (which makes a difference outdoors with weight) or wind resistance (size related) your weight is a virtual irrelevance. It's all about fitness and power.
  • Sunshine6909
    Sunshine6909 Posts: 108 Member
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    sijomial wrote: »
    Remember seated cycling isn't a weight bearing exercise.

    So for walking or running yes weight is a significant factor.

    Ah, thank you for taking the time to answer my question, that does make sense! :-)
  • TimothyFish
    TimothyFish Posts: 4,925 Member
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    Two people exerting the same effort will burn exactly the same calories, but more fit cyclist can travel a greater distance with less effort. The difference is less noticeable on a stationary bike. I would go with the lower calorie figure. Also consider that the bike is measuring actual effort while the MFP estimate is based on your perception.
  • katieloconnor96
    katieloconnor96 Posts: 3 Member
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    For some reason my thinking was if a lighter person & a heavier person exerted the same amount of effort that the heavier person would burn more calories because they have added weight. Don't know where that line of thinking came from & it has now started a physics conversation in my house. Oh dear! :-)

    Yes! This is completely true, for example if a ten stone person walked a mile they would burn around 100 calories whereas if I, at 16 stone, walk a mile I can burn around 160!
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,701 Member
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    IIRC, MFP doesn't include resistance or distance in its numbers, just time. The bike does, so I would consider its numbers to be somewhat more accurate.