I Have Once Again Broken My Foot

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Shana67
Shana67 Posts: 680 Member
edited July 2017 in Health and Weight Loss
GAAAAH!!! Back in October, when I was really on a weight loss roll, I broke my foot. I didn't even break it in some fancy shiny type of way – I just stepped off of the front porch step slipped and broke it. By monitoring my caloric intake like a hawk, I was actually able to lose the weight I wanted to prior to going on vacation.

So here it is, nine months later and I just have 9 pounds to lose prior to our vacation in August, and I was cooking along so very well. Yesterday morning I did the exact same thing – stepped off of our front porch slipped and broke the same dang foot.

I know that I can continue to lose the weight that I need to lose by watching what I eat very carefully. I've done it before and I can do it again – sigh. It's just so discouraging. I was looking forward to a fun summer of hiking and doing a lot of great outdoors activities.

Our vacation is our 10th anniversary trip to a Sandals resort in the Bahamas – by God this foot had better be fixed by then.
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Replies

  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 34,012 Member
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    Metatarsal? I did the same thing, in my own front yard. Flip-flops didn't help, it made it easier for my foot to roll. I almost never wear non supportive sandals any more for that reason.

    Nothing heals faster than the Atlantic Ocean and a week in the warm sand, so there's that. :wink:
  • PaulaWallaDingDong
    PaulaWallaDingDong Posts: 4,641 Member
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    Your story worries the nurse in me. The fact that stepping wrong off a single step has caused you to break bones twice in less than a year raises several warning flags.

    I strongly encourage you to discuss your two breaks with your doctor. Your bone density may be low and you may or may not have micronutrient deficiencies which need to be assessed and addressed.

    What is your calorie deficit? How long have you been at a deficit? How much weight have you lost? Do you get enough calcium and vitamin D? Have you discussed your two breaks with your physician?

    Finally, I don't know why this isn't mentioned to people who are having injuries cared for, but it is strongly recommended that people with traumatic injuries (like your break) or surgical injuries eat at maintenance calories or even a tiny bit more. Your body needs those extra calories to repair your injury and to ensure that all the bone and soft tissue damage will heal as strong or stronger than they were before your injury. Healing and preventing long term pain or damage is of extreme importance. Losing a goal weight by increasing your calorie deficit further can potentially be very detrimental to the healing process.

    This is what I was thinking. Trying to lose weight while a bone is healing may be setting you up for repeated breakage. It's nice to look good in a bathing suit or in a photo with palm trees in the background, but you could use to take your focus off of what's shiny and pretty and start looking at what's important.
  • Shana67
    Shana67 Posts: 680 Member
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    vespiquenn wrote: »
    ..you might want to invest in a ramp.
    LOLOL!!! My husband said the same. Ha.

  • Shana67
    Shana67 Posts: 680 Member
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    Metatarsal? I did the same thing, in my own front yard. Flip-flops didn't help, it made it easier for my foot to roll. I almost never wear non supportive sandals any more for that reason.

    Nothing heals faster than the Atlantic Ocean and a week in the warm sand, so there's that. :wink:

    YES! Flip flops. I was indeed wearing them at the time. And I love them - I grew up in S California and they are just a way of life. However, this happening again has me rethinking.
  • Shana67
    Shana67 Posts: 680 Member
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    Your story worries the nurse in me. The fact that stepping wrong off a single step has caused you to break bones twice in less than a year raises several warning flags.

    I strongly encourage you to discuss your two breaks with your doctor. Your bone density may be low and you may or may not have micronutrient deficiencies which need to be assessed and addressed.

    What is your calorie deficit? How long have you been at a deficit? How much weight have you lost? Do you get enough calcium and vitamin D? Have you discussed your two breaks with your physician?

    Finally, I don't know why this isn't mentioned to people who are having injuries cared for, but it is strongly recommended that people with traumatic injuries (like your break) or surgical injuries eat at maintenance calories or even a tiny bit more. Your body needs those extra calories to repair your injury and to ensure that all the bone and soft tissue damage will heal as strong or stronger than they were before your injury. Healing and preventing long term pain or damage is of extreme importance. Losing a goal weight by increasing your calorie deficit further can potentially be very detrimental to the healing process.

    Hi there - you make some excellent points about bone density and diet, and I promise to seriously consider them. However, I had my annual exam last month and have no deficiencies in calcium or bone density, period. I see an excellent orthopedic surgeon (he is the Team Doc for our lovely Denver Broncos :) ), so yes - when I see him tomorrow this will be discussed. Actually - I don't know *for sure* that this is a break until it's X-Rayed. It's just that it hurts the same/worse than the last time - so I am making an assumption. Hopefully I will be wrong :)

    I've lost 40 pounds, and would like to lose 20 more. The 9 I would like to drop prior to vacation are simply because I know that I will gain 9lbs on vacation. Which is typical for me. ;)
  • Shana67
    Shana67 Posts: 680 Member
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    This is what I was thinking. Trying to lose weight while a bone is healing may be setting you up for repeated breakage. It's nice to look good in a bathing suit or in a photo with palm trees in the background, but you could use to take your focus off of what's shiny and pretty and start looking at what's important.

    This is just a tiny bit harsh, given that you don't know me. But I thank you for your concern and will take those concerns to heart. Thanks!

  • macgurlnet
    macgurlnet Posts: 1,946 Member
    edited July 2017
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    I think you've gotten great advice about recovery....so here I am with a shoe suggestion!

    Perhaps some sturdier flip flops, like the ones here: http://www.chacos.com/US/en/womens-flip-flops/

    I totally get being comfy, but that company makes higher quality/supportive stuff - my sister has arch issues and LOVES her Chacos.

    ~Lyssa
  • DancingMoosie
    DancingMoosie Posts: 8,613 Member
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    Even if its broken, you can still do upper-body exercises! When my knee was sore, I hobbled around the weight room and did all the upper body machines:)
  • Shana67
    Shana67 Posts: 680 Member
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    macgurlnet wrote: »
    I think you've gotten great advice about recovery....so here I am with a shoe suggestion!

    Perhaps some sturdier flip flops, like the ones here: http://www.chacos.com/US/en/womens-flip-flops/

    I totally get being comfy, but that company makes higher quality/supportive stuff - my sister has arch issues and LOVES her Chacos.

    ~Lyssa

    Oh gosh - I appreciate the link so much - thank you!!!
  • Shana67
    Shana67 Posts: 680 Member
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    Even if its broken, you can still do upper-body exercises! When my knee was sore, I hobbled around the weight room and did all the upper body machines:)

    I was thinking the same about strength training. I feel like I could also still do lower body stuff - just not with my left foot. You know?
  • DancingMoosie
    DancingMoosie Posts: 8,613 Member
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    Nah, don't do lower body with one leg. Just wait until you can do both. You might be able to pedal a stationary bike or do leg ext./curls with both legs, depending on severity of injury and type of brace.
  • Shana67
    Shana67 Posts: 680 Member
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    Nah, don't do lower body with one leg. Just wait until you can do both. You might be able to pedal a stationary bike or do leg ext./curls with both legs, depending on severity of injury and type of brace.

    Okay. Swimming maybe then? Once it isn't so sore. My foot, that is.
  • DancingMoosie
    DancingMoosie Posts: 8,613 Member
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    yeah...
  • PaulaWallaDingDong
    PaulaWallaDingDong Posts: 4,641 Member
    edited July 2017
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    Shana67 wrote: »
    This is what I was thinking. Trying to lose weight while a bone is healing may be setting you up for repeated breakage. It's nice to look good in a bathing suit or in a photo with palm trees in the background, but you could use to take your focus off of what's shiny and pretty and start looking at what's important.

    This is just a tiny bit harsh, given that you don't know me. But I thank you for your concern and will take those concerns to heart. Thanks!

    I didn't mean for it to come off as judgemental, but I can see that it did, so, apologies. Just trying to help put things into perspective.
  • shadowfax_c11
    shadowfax_c11 Posts: 1,942 Member
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    OUch! I broke mine last year when I dropped a draft horse on it. No fun at all.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    edited July 2017
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    Shana67 wrote: »
    Your story worries the nurse in me. The fact that stepping wrong off a single step has caused you to break bones twice in less than a year raises several warning flags.

    I strongly encourage you to discuss your two breaks with your doctor. Your bone density may be low and you may or may not have micronutrient deficiencies which need to be assessed and addressed.

    What is your calorie deficit? How long have you been at a deficit? How much weight have you lost? Do you get enough calcium and vitamin D? Have you discussed your two breaks with your physician?

    Finally, I don't know why this isn't mentioned to people who are having injuries cared for, but it is strongly recommended that people with traumatic injuries (like your break) or surgical injuries eat at maintenance calories or even a tiny bit more. Your body needs those extra calories to repair your injury and to ensure that all the bone and soft tissue damage will heal as strong or stronger than they were before your injury. Healing and preventing long term pain or damage is of extreme importance. Losing a goal weight by increasing your calorie deficit further can potentially be very detrimental to the healing process.

    Hi there - you make some excellent points about bone density and diet, and I promise to seriously consider them. However, I had my annual exam last month and have no deficiencies in calcium or bone density, period. I see an excellent orthopedic surgeon (he is the Team Doc for our lovely Denver Broncos :) ), so yes - when I see him tomorrow this will be discussed. Actually - I don't know *for sure* that this is a break until it's X-Rayed. It's just that it hurts the same/worse than the last time - so I am making an assumption. Hopefully I will be wrong :)

    I've lost 40 pounds, and would like to lose 20 more. The 9 I would like to drop prior to vacation are simply because I know that I will gain 9lbs on vacation. Which is typical for me. ;)

    Could you be sitting around typing on the internet if you had a broken foot? I've never broken anything, but wouldn't you be in excruciating mind numbing pain and off to the ER in record time if you actually did break it?

    Maybe I'm just a wuss, and it is not as painful as I imagine it would be.

    ETA: I'm picturing your foot just hanging off of your ankle swinging around in the wind lol :confounded:
  • Momepro
    Momepro Posts: 1,509 Member
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    Shana67 wrote: »
    Your story worries the nurse in me. The fact that stepping wrong off a single step has caused you to break bones twice in less than a year raises several warning flags.

    I strongly encourage you to discuss your two breaks with your doctor. Your bone density may be low and you may or may not have micronutrient deficiencies which need to be assessed and addressed.

    What is your calorie deficit? How long have you been at a deficit? How much weight have you lost? Do you get enough calcium and vitamin D? Have you discussed your two breaks with your physician?

    Finally, I don't know why this isn't mentioned to people who are having injuries cared for, but it is strongly recommended that people with traumatic injuries (like your break) or surgical injuries eat at maintenance calories or even a tiny bit more. Your body needs those extra calories to repair your injury and to ensure that all the bone and soft tissue damage will heal as strong or stronger than they were before your injury. Healing and preventing long term pain or damage is of extreme importance. Losing a goal weight by increasing your calorie deficit further can potentially be very detrimental to the healing process.

    Hi there - you make some excellent points about bone density and diet, and I promise to seriously consider them. However, I had my annual exam last month and have no deficiencies in calcium or bone density, period. I see an excellent orthopedic surgeon (he is the Team Doc for our lovely Denver Broncos :) ), so yes - when I see him tomorrow this will be discussed. Actually - I don't know *for sure* that this is a break until it's X-Rayed. It's just that it hurts the same/worse than the last time - so I am making an assumption. Hopefully I will be wrong :)

    I've lost 40 pounds, and would like to lose 20 more. The 9 I would like to drop prior to vacation are simply because I know that I will gain 9lbs on vacation. Which is typical for me. ;)

    Could you be sitting around typing on the internet if you had a broken foot? I've never broken anything, but wouldn't you be in excruciating mind numbing pain and off to the ER in record time if you actually did break it?

    Maybe I'm just a wuss, and it is not as painful as I imagine it would be.

    ETA: I'm picturing your foot just hanging off of your ankle swinging around in the wind lol :confounded:

    Lol, I'm assuming she has been to the Dr, and gotten it braced and supported, and is on an antiinflammatory painkiller like ibuprofen. Often, even when a break is suspected they don't xray immediately, unless it is pretty obvious. Apparently the swelling has to go down enough to get a clear picture, and set it properly. This generally takes a couple days. In the meantime they put it in a temporary immobilizing splint, that can be loose ed or tightened depending on amount of swelling, for support without cutting off circulation.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
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    Shana67 wrote: »
    Your story worries the nurse in me. The fact that stepping wrong off a single step has caused you to break bones twice in less than a year raises several warning flags.

    I strongly encourage you to discuss your two breaks with your doctor. Your bone density may be low and you may or may not have micronutrient deficiencies which need to be assessed and addressed.

    What is your calorie deficit? How long have you been at a deficit? How much weight have you lost? Do you get enough calcium and vitamin D? Have you discussed your two breaks with your physician?

    Finally, I don't know why this isn't mentioned to people who are having injuries cared for, but it is strongly recommended that people with traumatic injuries (like your break) or surgical injuries eat at maintenance calories or even a tiny bit more. Your body needs those extra calories to repair your injury and to ensure that all the bone and soft tissue damage will heal as strong or stronger than they were before your injury. Healing and preventing long term pain or damage is of extreme importance. Losing a goal weight by increasing your calorie deficit further can potentially be very detrimental to the healing process.

    Hi there - you make some excellent points about bone density and diet, and I promise to seriously consider them. However, I had my annual exam last month and have no deficiencies in calcium or bone density, period. I see an excellent orthopedic surgeon (he is the Team Doc for our lovely Denver Broncos :) ), so yes - when I see him tomorrow this will be discussed. Actually - I don't know *for sure* that this is a break until it's X-Rayed. It's just that it hurts the same/worse than the last time - so I am making an assumption. Hopefully I will be wrong :)

    I've lost 40 pounds, and would like to lose 20 more. The 9 I would like to drop prior to vacation are simply because I know that I will gain 9lbs on vacation. Which is typical for me. ;)

    Could you be sitting around typing on the internet if you had a broken foot? I've never broken anything, but wouldn't you be in excruciating mind numbing pain and off to the ER in record time if you actually did break it?

    Maybe I'm just a wuss, and it is not as painful as I imagine it would be.

    ETA: I'm picturing your foot just hanging off of your ankle swinging around in the wind lol :confounded:

    I had a friend wander about with a broken foot for a few days. It's a smallish bone, though a pretty essential one. But it can easily be mistaken for a sprain.

    Apparently me leaping onto my ankle and ripping all the soft tissue up was worse than a break and all I got was soft bandaging!

    So you'll be sporting a stylish moon boot OP? I had another friend do this last year and another one at dance school. Seems I know a lot of clumsy people. The one last year is a PT and it was around the time of that push up challenge. She did it one legged like a boss.