Myfitnesspal

Message Boards Food and Nutrition
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Monthly Grocery Budget

1246

Replies

  • laurenebargarlaurenebargar Member Posts: 1,561 Member Member Posts: 1,561 Member
    About 100-150 a week for my husband and I and our dog (the dog is included because she we raw feed so eggs, meat, and bones when on sale we buy alot of) I keep trying to trim our budget down, a good website ive found for us while we are slowly cutting down on the amount of meat we eat is Budget Bytes. We made a great soup the other night for around $9 that lasted four days (lunch and dinner)
  • erica_todayerica_today Member Posts: 185 Member Member Posts: 185 Member
    Idk the prices there but here in California in the US I spend about 100$ per person per month. That's 4 of us. And we eat healthy foods.
  • nlwrfanlwrfa Member Posts: 118 Member Member Posts: 118 Member
    I spend about $70-100/week (USD) for myself. But I usually have steak twice a week (anemic so need red meat cause I refuse to take pills),salmon and chicken, fresh veggies and fruit, milk, eggs, yogurt.
  • npanenpane Member Posts: 22 Member Member Posts: 22 Member
    I am loving buying fresh produce at our local 99 cent store! Fresh asparagus,mini peppers,broccoli all for $.99. Asparagus was $3.99 a lb at our local Whole Foods store this week so I passed it up. Always shop grocery store sales for meats,fish,poultry.
  • zjpqzjpq Member Posts: 198 Member Member Posts: 198 Member
    We live in New Zealand now and spend about 200nzd a week for 2 adults and 2 kids, one who eats like an adult. I think we spent about the same when we lived in the US
  • GlassAngylGlassAngyl Member Posts: 478 Member Member Posts: 478 Member
    7 person household.. about 800$ a month.
  • macchiattomacchiatto Member Posts: 2,888 Member Member Posts: 2,888 Member
    We're in the US and I aim to spend $400/mo for a family of four. Used to be $300/mo but we gradually upped it (and I don't coupon as much as I used to) to allow for more fish, fresh produce, etc. Aldi is one of my favorite grocery stores. I also get some good deals through Amazon S&S and then I meal plan and shop based on what's on sale at other local grocery stores.
    edited August 2017
  • ktekcktekc Member Posts: 879 Member Member Posts: 879 Member
    for those who use coupons go to the krazy coupon lady website. they have a running list of just about every coupon online at any given time and links to them. Lots of other stuff on there too. money saving tips and such. she also has a youtube channel with alot of good videos.
    edited August 2017
  • EvamuttEvamutt Member Posts: 1,719 Member Member Posts: 1,719 Member
    for me & husband around $400/month US dollars plus we have dogs. I buy bulk meat if it's on sale. We rarely eat out & most of our food consists of ground turkey, chicken & some pork, lots of veggies, fruit- frozen & fresh, yogurt, almond milk, eggs, ham etc
  • cjv73cjv73 Member, Premium Posts: 263 Member Member, Premium Posts: 263 Member
    KelseyRL wrote: »
    Thanks for all the replies everyone. It's quite obvious to me that we should be able to eat for less money.

    Over the last few months we've averaged nearly $1000, again, not eating out or buying liquor.

    I spend about $900-1200 a month for a family of 7, including cleaning products, personal hygiene, all the extras. I don't buy very much meat because we do butcher a couple of pigs each year, and we have our own laying hens for eggs. We only eat out as a family about one a year, if that (yes, you read that right!) and we don't buy liquor.

    We're in Ontario.

  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEldRuNaRoUnDaFiEld Member Posts: 5,876 Member Member Posts: 5,876 Member
    yirara wrote: »
    Uk and spend £240 a month for 3 adults.

    Eat seasonal fruit and veg and what ever is on Aldi super 6. Make my own yoghurt by the kg.

    Cook beans/chick peas in bulk from scratch then freeze. Buy whole chickens, remove the skin and dice the whole thing up. Freeze in 100g servings.
    Buy large joints of gammon etc that are cheaper per kg and cook and freeze in 100g servings.
    Bulk everything out with veg.

    How do you make yoghurt? I'm really addicted to natural Skyr, but it's either expensive at Tesco, etc or usually not available at Lidl.
    http://www.intoxicatedonlife.com/2014/09/09/homemade-counter-top-yogurt-heat-required/

    Here you go, takes me 3-4 minutes before bed and it's ready by morning.
  • seltzermint555seltzermint555 Member Posts: 10,605 Member Member Posts: 10,605 Member
    It's just me & my husband, and we spend only about $60/week on groceries. That is not including things like laundry detergent and other household stuff (I guess some people include that in their budget for groceries but we don't).

    We don't eat meat which I think helps with the cost staying so low. We buy a LOT of in-season and/or frozen produce and staples like beans, rice, lentils, potatoes, etc. Stock up at stores that specialize in ethnic (Asian & Hispanic) and the old school health food stores that sell in bulk w/ no frills, and we rarely purchase prepared things like protein bars. I bake bread, naan and any treats we may have, like cookies.

    We also stick very strictly to a list. At the beginning of each week we plan out X number of meals (breakfast, lunch dinner) and only buy what we need to make those meals. He works from home and cooks a hot lunch for us every weekday and I am able to come home for lunch. So there are many things about our lifestyle that makes this work for us that I know don't apply to everyone!

    We do eat out 2-3 times on the weekend.
  • pixishpixish Member Posts: 79 Member Member Posts: 79 Member
    I'm in Australia so the dollar amounts will not be comparative anyway, but I have found a couple of things that help reduce our budget are:

    - Making a meal plan for the week and sticking to it. This might include a night where I make a meal that will last for two nights (Soup, Lasagne, pasta bake, etc) I don't always do this but I do notice the difference in what we spend when I do!
    - I buy meat from the grocery store and then use half of it and then bulk out the meal with added beans or lentils (or skip the meat entirely)
    - I grocery shop online...it takes a bit longer than if I were to go in but I can keep track of what I'm spending. The only thing is that I miss out on any discounted items that might be on the shelf but I possibly didn't need them anyway...
  • kellyjellybellyjellykellyjellybellyjelly Member Posts: 9,480 Member Member Posts: 9,480 Member
    (Midwest, USA here), I'm a very frugal grocery shopper. Family of 5 here, plus 2 cats, and we have a $100 a week/$400 a month budget for groceries-this also includes non-food items like paper goods (toilet paper, kleenex, trash bags etc), cleaning supplies (laundry soap, dish soap, bleach and vinegar etc), personal hygiene, (feminine hygiene for 2, soap, shampoo etc), and then cat food/litter (litter is sporadic because our cats use our yard as a giant litter box most days :p ).

    My biggest tips:

    -explore the different (hidden) resources in your area! What stores do you have? Are their unconventional options around? Things like bread outlets, farmers markets, farm stands, Dollar stores that sell food, friends/family that have gardens/chickens that you can trade etc etc.

    -learn how to 'shop' from your kitchen-before you sit down to make a menu plan/grocery list go through your cupboards/fridge/freezer and see what you already have, that you can build off of. That pkt of taco seasoning hiding in the back of your pantry is a good start for a taco bar. Have a 1/2 container of sour cream? Find a new casserole recipe that uses it etc etc.

    -along with that menu plan, menu plan, menu plan :) It doesn't have to be set in stone, but I spend a few minutes writing out a list of suppers that I want to rotate through during each grocery cycle. I always have store ads pulled up online when I do this, and from my kitchen 'shopping' and then what sales are going, I put together meal ideas.

    -after you have your menu plan then it's time to get your grocery list hammered out. As I'm menu planning I jot down ingredients I need on scrap paper, and then I organize this and make a list. I also organize my list based on store layout-grouping similar ingredients/departments together. This will save time when you're shopping.

    -walk into the store with CASH. This will prevent impulse purchases that can get your budget off course. Leave your debit/check book/cc at home.

    -and then learn how to properly store food. This is a biggie that I've really been focusing on. I only shop every 2 weeks so the fresh produce I buy has to last a long time. Same with bread products. I've spent a lot of time reading up on how to properly store things to make them last-this reduces food waste and prevents extra trips to the store!

    eta: we do an envelope system (Dave Ramsey), and we have a separate account labeled 'fun'-this gets $40 a week/$80 per pay period and covers eating out, alcohol, Redbox movies etc. We usually eat out as a family once a week-usually pizza or Fazolis (the 5 of us eat here for under $25 and they have unlimited bread sticks-score lol!). My good quality coffee comes out of this envelope as well :)

    eta #2: me and the kids eat at home for all our meals but hubby has a separate account for his work lunches.

    Great advice!

    I'm definitely guilty of being an impulse shopper. The past few weeks I've gotten better by going through my cupboards, freezers, fridge, & pantry & looking at what I already have & trying to make meals with what I already have. Since doing this I've barely had to buy anything at the grocery store with the exception of some fun treats that I bought to experiment with the protein ice cream I've been making for dessert almost every night.
  • EHollander89EHollander89 Member Posts: 169 Member Member Posts: 169 Member
    I want to work on my grocery budget, too. I spend probably $75 per week on average for myself. Sometimes that includes food I'm preparing for myself and my boyfriend. I do make an effort to plan out my meals for the week. I usually go to the grocery store on Sundays with my shopping list and then meal prep for the week. I've been trying to get better about only buying what is on my list or only adding in one impulse buy. Sometimes if I see a good sale on something I use all the time, I'll buy extra. If I'm getting several kinds of meat, then I know I'll be spending more. Everyone is sharing great advice! I need to revisit Aldi. I've only been there a few times, but they definitely have great deals on meat.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 39,132 Member Member Posts: 39,132 Member
    I'd say on average we spend around $250 per week...sometimes a bit more and sometimes a bit less. This typically also includes household items like dish soap, dishwasher detergent, laundry detergent, paper towels, toilet paper, etc...
  • ritzvinritzvin Member, Premium Posts: 2,764 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,764 Member
    Stuff that makes a difference for me:
    • Shopping at the PriceRite versus Wegmans saves a lot of money (your chains will be different, but many people have 1 really nice chain with everything and a cheaper chain. The difference on simple staple items adds up (a lot). $0.50-$1 difference for each item of canned veg/dried beans/dairy container/frozen bag of veg, etc adds up pretty quick. You also won't be passing by a patisserie, sushi stand, olive bar, cheese counters, gourmet sausages and junk food. The tempting impulse items aren't at the cheap place (unless you have a penchant for cheap snack cakes/off brand cheese doodles, etc).
    • Taking a more modular approach to food and not being too picky. For instance, "a meat" rather than some specific meat - whatever is cheap. And being more flexible on lean-ness (as in buy the rest of the chicken not just the boneless, skinless chicken breasts). I don't buy the really fatty stuff (which includes the cheaper 80/20 beef), but allow much more fat than chicken breast & fish. I'm usually too cheap to buy beef. What I buy gets cooked up in bulk, chopped, and thrown in a freezer bag to be added to stuff interchangeably.
    • Not paying for convenience. (pre-bagged,chopped salads and indivdual yogurts-although I throw an occasional individual flavored yogurt into the mix for a change- add up pretty quickly). However, I do appreciate the convenience factor in frozen vegetables being pre-washed and chopped for me (but due to ease of logistics, you don't usually have to pay for that convenience).
    • Lots of soup. (dried beans are really cheap, then just add random veggies and a meat). - Cheap and pretty much no work required.
    • I don't eat out anywhere near as much (and order fewer drinks), which makes the biggest difference. (Not worth the calories).

    Edit: missing decimal point
    edited August 2017
  • ritzvinritzvin Member, Premium Posts: 2,764 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,764 Member
    Aldi is a NO for me though. Way too many inexpensive gourmet junk food and cheese options. I don't have the impulse control for it. (Seriously, first thing on walking in the door, you are met with a wall of amazing Belgian chocolate - how evil is that, followed by very excellent continental cookies,..., <$3 wheels of camambert and brie,...).
  • seltzermint555seltzermint555 Member Posts: 10,605 Member Member Posts: 10,605 Member
    I spend about 100 a week for me and my husband and adult son . We pack all lunches and eat out dinner about 1 or 2 times a month. I plan my weeks menu based on the store flyers ad sales for meat and produce. Aldis has a fit & active line of foods that are quite good. Their produce is very fresh and cheap. I do not buy much from a deli or bakery department unless it is marked down. We eat alot of hamburger and chicken, tuna and ground turkey. Not much goes to waste. Also try to shop from my freezer before I bring more food into the house. Don't want to have to throw away food that has become freezer burnt.

    This sounds a lot like our household, too. I really don't like to be too "stocked" because I find it gets harder to plan meals we will actually look forward to...we try to go through most things in our freezer pretty quickly, as you mentioned. Very little waste.

    I also like a lot of Aldi's Fit & Active line. Good stuff. I mostly go to Aldi for produce and dairy. Their nonfat plain Greek yogurt in the big tub is the best we've tried, better even than Fage or Oikos.

    My ex husband was a bit of a nightmare in this area as he had a list of easily $50-70/week of random snacks and various drinks he absolutely "had to have". Just cutting that stuff out, it's amazing how much you can save! That's the entire grocery budget with my current husband.

    I do wish I could say we're as frugal about dining out. We don't spend a ton on our meals out, only splurging on a $70 sushi meal once or twice per year. But we do eat out 2-3 times every weekend.

    edited August 2017
  • kellyjellybellyjellykellyjellybellyjelly Member Posts: 9,480 Member Member Posts: 9,480 Member
    I spend about 100 a week for me and my husband and adult son . We pack all lunches and eat out dinner about 1 or 2 times a month. I plan my weeks menu based on the store flyers ad sales for meat and produce. Aldis has a fit & active line of foods that are quite good. Their produce is very fresh and cheap. I do not buy much from a deli or bakery department unless it is marked down. We eat alot of hamburger and chicken, tuna and ground turkey. Not much goes to waste. Also try to shop from my freezer before I bring more food into the house. Don't want to have to throw away food that has become freezer burnt.

    This sounds a lot like our household, too. I really don't like to be too "stocked" because I find it gets harder to plan meals we will actually look forward to...we try to go through most things in our freezer pretty quickly, as you mentioned. Very little waste.

    I also like a lot of Aldi's Fit & Active line. Good stuff. I mostly go to Aldi for produce and dairy. Their nonfat plain Greek yogurt in the big tub is the best we've tried, better even than Fage or Oikos.

    My ex husband was a bit of a nightmare in this area as he had a list of easily $50-70/week of random snacks and various drinks he absolutely "had to have". Just cutting that stuff out, it's amazing how much you can save! That's the entire grocery budget with my current husband.

    I do wish I could say we're as frugal about dining out. We don't spend a ton on our meals out, only splurging on a $70 sushi meal once or twice per year. But we do eat out 2-3 times every weekend.

    I was shocked with how much I loved Aldi's nonfat plain greek yogurt.
Sign In or Register to comment.