How do you eat??

How has anyone overcome the anxiety of starting a new eating routine (diet) .. I mean when you’re not dieting or “watching” what you eat, you just eat, no issues. When you (well ME) attempt ATTEMPT to eat better because you want so bad to lose weight, all of a sudden anxiety kicks in and I literally start to worry and as soon as I think about about eating I realize I have to THINK about it... to the point where it’d be easier if I just didn’t have to eat at all. But I usually just end up saying, screw it, I’m going to Taco Bell!
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Replies

  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 23,620 Member
    When I was on a mission to lose weight, I just dropped a handful of cashews from my mid-afternoon snacks. I was thinking about doing that anyway because they weren't sitting well with me. I also changed my after work snack from chocolate to cottage cheese, cucumber and whole wheat crackers. And I eat a bit less for dinner.

    So really, not much of a change.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,576 Member
    You avoid that anxiety by not making drastic changes to diet content and focusing on the amounts/calories first. As you do this you will likely gravitate toward more lower calorie options simply because you can eat more for the same calories. But if you want Taco Bell in your diet then have Taco Bell. Thin people eat Taco Bell too.
  • French_Peasant
    French_Peasant Posts: 1,639 Member
    If you are feeling anxiety, it might be helpful for you to spend a few days and establish a diet baseline: eat how you would normally eat, but weigh/measure and log everything. Sure, that's a few days that you don't spend actively losing weight, but the result can be eye-opening, and if you are weighing, you can start developing your eye for what portion sizes actually look like. If you eat at a restaurant, check out the calories and prepare to be scandalized.

    Then, when you are ready, just start changing one thing at a time, using some of the excellent suggestions above. Maybe start with preparing healthy, low calorie snacks so you don't go to a vending machine in the afternoon, or change up high-calorie sweet tea for unsweet tea + 1 tablespoon of sugar (45 calories), or if you say "screw it, I'm going to Taco Bell!" figure out what they have on their menu that is going to help you meet your goals, or go to Wendy's instead and get a baked potato and a side salad with low calorie dressing. (One of my tricks for a baked potato is to use just a little butter, and a LOT of 0% fat Greek yogurt, which tastes like sour cream with a much better nutritional profile, and then a lot of fresh cracked black pepper, chives, green onion, steamed broccoli, and a bit of sea salt).

    You don't have to make a huge, insane change all at once, where you're picking at salads, tofu and help seed all day long and freaking out over it. Your goal should be to get healthier habits ingrained so they are not causing you anxiety, and you can do that a baby step at a time.

    Good luck as you begin!
  • busyPK
    busyPK Posts: 3,788 Member
    I don't think I made drastic changes with my food choices. I weigh my food now and log it. If I want pizza, I have pizza. Half the reason I exercise is to eat a bit more or to eat those more calorie dense foods. I find doing this helps me stay on track with losing around 1lb per week and not derail and give up.
  • JennJ323
    JennJ323 Posts: 646 Member
    I found meal planning/prepping worked best for me. On Wednesday I'll start thinking ahead to what I'm going to make myself for breakfasts/lunches during the following work week (I eat the same thing each day during the week for breakfast & lunch) and I plan what we'll have for dinners (my husband, daughter and I). I take the time to plan everything out, make my list, do my shopping & prepping on the weekend then I have nothing to think/worry about during the week. Everything is planned and ready to go. It really has made this much easier and now that I've been doing it for several months it's become second nature and I look forward to planning each week.
  • SezxyStef
    SezxyStef Posts: 15,268 Member
    How has anyone overcome the anxiety of starting a new eating routine (diet) .. I mean when you’re not dieting or “watching” what you eat, you just eat, no issues. When you (well ME) attempt ATTEMPT to eat better because you want so bad to lose weight, all of a sudden anxiety kicks in and I literally start to worry and as soon as I think about about eating I realize I have to THINK about it... to the point where it’d be easier if I just didn’t have to eat at all. But I usually just end up saying, screw it, I’m going to Taco Bell!

    Define eating better...if you mean more salads and lean meats that is not necessary to lose weight.

    You can eat what you want just less of it...log it stay in goal and you will lose weight...see no stress/anxiety
  • MegaMooseEsq
    MegaMooseEsq Posts: 3,118 Member
    As many other folks have already said, I think the gradual approach is the way to go, especially if you've got a lot of anxiety around changing the way you eat. What are you doing already that's healthy and that you enjoy? Can you do that more? What are you doing that's less healthy? Can you do it less, or find a healthier substitute?
  • xvolution
    xvolution Posts: 721 Member
    It's easier to stick to a lifestyle change when you make small changes over time rather than a huge change all at once. Like if you're trying to reduce how much sodium you have, try reducing your intake by 100mg at a time, only lowering it more once you get used to the new lower number. Eventually you'll reach a point where doing the lifestyle change is natural.
  • 2snakeswoman
    2snakeswoman Posts: 655 Member
    I'm struggling with this. I recently switched to a vegetarian diet for reasons other than weight loss, but I was encouraged by stories from other people about how they started dropping weight as soon as they stopped eating animal products. Not true for me. I also stopped casual drinking at home, so no more glass or wine or beer most evenings. Guess what - haven't lost a single pound from that change, either. I guess I'm going to have to start logging again, but I totally hate doing it. Maybe if I can hang in there long enough to create about a two weeks rotation of appropriate meals, it won't be so unbearable. Sigh ... maybe. Change is tough.
  • MegaMooseEsq
    MegaMooseEsq Posts: 3,118 Member
    I'm struggling with this. I recently switched to a vegetarian diet for reasons other than weight loss, but I was encouraged by stories from other people about how they started dropping weight as soon as they stopped eating animal products. Not true for me. I also stopped casual drinking at home, so no more glass or wine or beer most evenings. Guess what - haven't lost a single pound from that change, either. I guess I'm going to have to start logging again, but I totally hate doing it. Maybe if I can hang in there long enough to create about a two weeks rotation of appropriate meals, it won't be so unbearable. Sigh ... maybe. Change is tough.

    If you haven't been doing this for at least two weeks, you really can't know what sort of results you might be getting. Hang in there! And just because a lot of people here log indefinitely doesn't mean you need to - try logging for just a week or so and seeing what sort of data you can get from that. Good luck!
  • Treece68
    Treece68 Posts: 780 Member
    __TMac__ wrote: »
    Maybe taking it in smaller steps will make it feel less daunting? I split my desire to get healthier into two parts:

    * First, lose weight by just eating less. I ate the same things I always ate, just less of it. Instead of two pieces of toast, I'd have just one. Instead of a large baked potato, a small one. I pre-logged an estimate of my food for the next day each evening, taking into account anything on the schedule that might need special planning. When I actually served the meal up, I'd get more exact by weighing all solids on a scale and measuring liquids by volume. I made my best guess for food cooked by others. Sometimes I'd have to skip a heavy calorie item entirely so it wouldn't push me over the edge, but that didn't happen too often.
    * Once that felt comfortable, then I started working on long-term health by increasing my nutrient density. Just adding more vegetables, really. Not so hard.

    My starting weight was 248. I'm down to 182, with 14 left to reach my goal.

    This so much this
  • kgirlhart
    kgirlhart Posts: 4,782 Member
    I did not drastically change what I ate. I just started eating smaller portions. Then I started paying attention to making sure I was getting enough protein. I learned that for me plenty of protein through the day keeps me fuller and adding in small portions of treats keeps me emotionally satisfied. I was able to lose this time without feeling deprived. I am in maintenance now and I still eat the same, I have just increased some if my portions and added a few extras here and there, but overall my diet looks the same.