I just got an electric bike! Maybe you want one, too...

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Last weekend, I bought an electric bike. All week, I commuted to work. My ride to work is 8.5 miles each way, and took me about 40 minutes. So, I'm getting 80 minutes of exercise each day and it was FUN.

I'm just posting this to encourage some of you to consider one of these bikes. (I'm not selling anything!)

The key thing about the electric bike is you can make it as hard as you want it to be. If you want a big workout, just leave the pedal assist off. If you don't want to work up a sweat or you're just tired, turn the pedal assist up. If a giant hill is on your route, trust me, it doesn't even feel like a hill if you turn on the highest level of pedal assist.

The best thing about my bike is the throttle. I use it when starting up again after stopping at an intersection or slowing for pedestrians.

In the morning, I use more help from the bike. After work, I want to work a little harder, so I have that option.

If you're looking for a new way to exercise, a ebike might be for you!
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Replies

  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
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    Glad you like yours!
  • 7elizamae
    7elizamae Posts: 758 Member
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    I love it! And I think it could be a great way for people on here to automatically exercise every day. So, I thought I'd post. But, maybe everyone thinks I'm nuts. :)
  • 7elizamae
    7elizamae Posts: 758 Member
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    I think eBikes have their place for people such as yourself who don't ride very far or very fast but for me one of the reasons I like bicycles is because I don't have to plug them in or refuel them. If I want to go somewhere I can just get on one and go.

    I get it -- they aren't what everyone wants. But it just takes a second for me to plug mine in. And it's just so fun! I love that I can make it as hard or easy as I want. I'm not tough enough to be a real bike commuter in our city with so many giant hills.
  • mph323
    mph323 Posts: 3,565 Member
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    My husband has one and has a lot of fun with it! It's pretty heavy so peddling without the assist is a workout, and having the motor lets him do some hills with me without hurting his back. Plus he's in love with all things gadget...
  • MsChewMe
    MsChewMe Posts: 130 Member
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    Which one did you get?

    My husband just got a new one (sondors) and I took it out for a spin. We have a ton of dirt hilly trails where we live. I was going back up a hill, super steep and very slippery, and I needed to get off and push. The bike is sort of heavy and hard to push, so I used the throttle to help me push me up the hill. It was fun and I got a small workout but I still like my old trail bike. I like riding for exercise. If I was using a bike to get to work maybe an electric bike would make perfect sense.
  • 7elizamae
    7elizamae Posts: 758 Member
    edited October 2017
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    I have a RadCity from RadPower Bikes. I'm mostly using it for commuting. I live in a city with a very decent multi-use paved trail that is near my house and gets me close to work. And yes, the bike is very heavy -- 60 pounds. When I turn off all the assist, it's a real workout to pedal, even on a level path. But today, I did about 20 miles for fun and loved every minute of it! The pedal assist feature keeps me plugging along, even up the hills.

    I think this is a great option for someone who wants to be active and outdoors but isn't some kind of serious athlete.
  • robertw486
    robertw486 Posts: 2,390 Member
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    It seems like commuting might be a great use for an electric. What kind of range do you think you might get with yours?
  • 7elizamae
    7elizamae Posts: 758 Member
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    robertw486 wrote: »
    It seems like commuting might be a great use for an electric. What kind of range do you think you might get with yours?

    Mine has a 20 - 30 mile range, depending on how you use the battery. I came back from my 20 mile ride yesterday and still had plenty of juice. I only really use level 1 pedal assist most of the time (which feels great and makes the ride fast and fun!). I save the throttle and higher pedal assist levels for hills. So, I'm getting lots out of each battery charge.

    I'm definitely getting my heart rate up and feeling some burn in my legs, but I'm not dripping with sweat or in agony climbing the hills. It's just right for me.
  • mom23mangos
    mom23mangos Posts: 3,070 Member
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    I had debated about getting one as my commute is almost exactly what yours is, but it takes me the same amount of time with my basic commuter non-electric bike. I was thinking it would halve that time. Of course it's relatively flat, with just 3-4 hills.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 3,084 Member
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    Interested in this discussion, since my wife is not a cyclist, but likes to join outings with my training group. We have a mix of strong cyclists and newbies among our group of friends. What I'm hoping is that an electric bike would allow my wife and others to join some of the social rides, say 30-40miles, where we are not riding aggressively or over hilly terrain. I'm thinking that she could pedal along for most of the ride, but use the battery power to support her as she fatigues.

    Is this a realistic expectation for an electric bike, say 30-50 miles over flat terrain?
  • 7elizamae
    7elizamae Posts: 758 Member
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    Djproulx wrote: »
    Interested in this discussion, since my wife is not a cyclist, but likes to join outings with my training group. We have a mix of strong cyclists and newbies among our group of friends. What I'm hoping is that an electric bike would allow my wife and others to join some of the social rides, say 30-40miles, where we are not riding aggressively or over hilly terrain. I'm thinking that she could pedal along for most of the ride, but use the battery power to support her as she fatigues.

    Is this a realistic expectation for an electric bike, say 30-50 miles over flat terrain?

    I think so. Check on the RadPower Bikes website. The 20 miles per charge assumes the rider is using power the whole time, I believe. I rode 20 yesterday with only level 1 power most of the time and had about a half charge left when I got home.

    Okay, I checked for you! Here's what I found:
    The high capacity 48 volt battery will propel you at full speed for 20-25 miles or much further at a slightly reduced speeds. There are many variables that effect exactly how far you will be able to travel on a single charge like wind, hills, payload, and speed. We get an average range of 30 miles in commute/urban environments and 20 miles with really heavy loads and steep hills.

    So, I guess the answer is, it depends. Don't know if that's helpful or not. I can say that it is definitely a LOT of fun and a decent workout. :) Can't believe how much I'm enjoying my commute -- even in the dark and the rain. :)
  • 7elizamae
    7elizamae Posts: 758 Member
    edited October 2017
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    I had debated about getting one as my commute is almost exactly what yours is, but it takes me the same amount of time with my basic commuter non-electric bike. I was thinking it would halve that time. Of course it's relatively flat, with just 3-4 hills.

    Well, bear in mind that I am very cautious, and my morning commute is in the dark. I'm certainly not going for speed -- I just want to get there safely, get some exercise, and enjoy being outdoors. My average mph is about 14. I have several long, steepish hills that slow things down, as well as some dark stretches where I really take it easy.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 3,084 Member
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    7elizamae wrote: »
    Djproulx wrote: »
    Interested in this discussion, since my wife is not a cyclist, but likes to join outings with my training group. We have a mix of strong cyclists and newbies among our group of friends. What I'm hoping is that an electric bike would allow my wife and others to join some of the social rides, say 30-40miles, where we are not riding aggressively or over hilly terrain. I'm thinking that she could pedal along for most of the ride, but use the battery power to support her as she fatigues.

    Is this a realistic expectation for an electric bike, say 30-50 miles over flat terrain?

    I think so. Check on the RadPower Bikes website. The 20 miles per charge assumes the rider is using power the whole time, I believe. I rode 20 yesterday with only level 1 power most of the time and had about a half charge left when I got home.

    Okay, I checked for you! Here's what I found:
    The high capacity 48 volt battery will propel you at full speed for 20-25 miles or much further at a slightly reduced speeds. There are many variables that effect exactly how far you will be able to travel on a single charge like wind, hills, payload, and speed. We get an average range of 30 miles in commute/urban environments and 20 miles with really heavy loads and steep hills.

    So, I guess the answer is, it depends. Don't know if that's helpful or not. I can say that it is definitely a LOT of fun and a decent workout. :) Can't believe how much I'm enjoying my commute -- even in the dark and the rain. :)

    Thanks. You've piqued my interest. I'll check it out. Enjoy your new ride!!
  • 7elizamae
    7elizamae Posts: 758 Member
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    If I'm honest I have to admit that I hate e-bikes but that is largely a function of the way a few idiots ride them (much the same as motorists hate cyclists because of the actions of a few dummies) and the fact that, with the exception of people who may have some health limitations, they are a solution in search of a problem.

    And now that there are e-bike that are virtually indistinguishable from road bikes I can see race organizers having to scrutinize bikes more closely to catch cheaters (yes, there are amateur age groupers who cheat...).

    :) I knew there'd be one in the crowd. I don't mind. Everyone has different goals.

    For me, the ebike is a solution to the problem of biking in my very, very hilly city (Seattle). With this bike, I get as sweaty as I want. I get a boost up my massive hills. I still get a workout. I have fun. I see the sunrise, the fall leaves, and get out of my car. I love it!

    I'm glad you like your regular bike, too.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
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    I thought you might be talking about Seattle. I couldn't remember for sure what the name of that eBike sure in Ballard was but it sounded familiar.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
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    I think eBikes have their place for people such as yourself who don't ride very far or very fast but for me one of the reasons I like bicycles is because I don't have to plug them in or refuel them. If I want to go somewhere I can just get on one and go.

    I have what you'd call a traditional road bike, but with Di2 (electronic shifting), which is wonderful. I have to change my groupset every 600 miles or so, or it'll become a single speed 34x16. I don't mind.

    I also live in hilly Seattle. Rode up and down Queen Anne last night for the scenery. Probably gain about 50' per mile on average riding around town.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,248 Member
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    I think eBikes have their place for people such as yourself who don't ride very far or very fast but for me one of the reasons I like bicycles is because I don't have to plug them in or refuel them. If I want to go somewhere I can just get on one and go.

    I have what you'd call a traditional road bike, but with Di2 (electronic shifting), which is wonderful. I have to change my groupset every 600 miles or so, or it'll become a single speed 34x16. I don't mind.

    I also live in hilly Seattle. Rode up and down Queen Anne last night for the scenery. Probably gain about 50' per mile on average riding around town.

    LOL I hope you meant charge your groupset!
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
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    Oops yeah. Charge not change. Even human powered bikes aren't immune anymore!