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Flax, Chia, seeds opinions please.

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I have been adding flax-seeds to my porridge for breakfast and buying seeded bread. Can I have your opinions on their nutritional worth on both them and Chia-seeds please?

Replies

  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
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    You should be able to look up the nutritional information for both and see if they're adding things to your diet that you need.

    Both have fat, fiber, protein, and additional nutrients like magnesium and iron.

    If you enjoy the taste of them and they're fitting into your goals, there is no reason not to eat them. But they also don't supply anything that can't be found in other foods.

    Are you grinding the flax prior to eating it? It's hard for our bodies to access the nutrients in unground flax seeds (unless you're incredibly great at chewing).
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,575 Member
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    I add chia seeds to beans, grains and soups to up the fiber content. I add a bit of ground flax to a lot of different things for the same reason. Everything from pbj, to stews, grains, buttered toast, pasta sauces ...

    I can't taste either the way I use them. The extra fiber is worth it to me because I feel longer when I eat high fiber so I add wherever I can without ruining the dish.
  • MissyCHF
    MissyCHF Posts: 337 Member
    edited October 2017
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    I'm using ready ground flax seeds at the moment, like you, Need2Exerc1se, for the fibre but I feel they have rather the opposite effect.

    Sorry, I forgot to say thank you both.
  • MissyCHF
    MissyCHF Posts: 337 Member
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    jwolinsky1 wrote: »
    Flaxseed is an outstanding source of protein and fiber—and it also acts as a health protector. It is beneficial for combating hypertension, cancer, depression, liver disease, and high cholesterol. The following articles have more detail on it.

    http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/what-to-eat/6-reasons-to-never-neglect-flax-seed
    https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/benefits-of-flaxseed#1

    On the other hand, there is not much scientific evidence proving the benefits of chia seeds.

    https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/truth-about-chia#1
    Thank you, Chia seeds are advertised as being healthy so I wondered about them, you have saved me money.

  • tibby531
    tibby531 Posts: 717 Member
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    I add chia seeds to my butternut squash and sweet potato "porridge" for breakfast. It doesn't add flavor, but it does add texture once it absorbs some of the milk and gels up a bit.
  • maryannprt
    maryannprt Posts: 152 Member
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    Chia seeds have 5 grams of fiber per tablespoon, along with a fair amount of potassium, iron, and other minerals. My daughter likes the gelatinous texture when added to liquids, I think it's gross. At 60 cal per tablespoon, if you like it, go for it, it also has a fair amount of poly and monounsaturated fats. No proof it helps with weight loss... in a 12 week study, chia seed eaters didn't lose more weight than non chia seed eaters.
  • Catawampous
    Catawampous Posts: 447 Member
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    Aren't chia seeds a good source of Omega 3's? Anyway I use them and make a chocolate pudding as a snack. Pretty filling!
  • MissyCHF
    MissyCHF Posts: 337 Member
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    I don't really fancy the idea of Chia as you describe it maryanprt but I wondered about whole flax seeds, there seems to be quite a bit in seeded bread so I might try it in my porridge instead of ground flax.
  • MissyCHF
    MissyCHF Posts: 337 Member
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    maryannprt wrote: »
    Chia seeds have 5 grams of fiber per tablespoon, along with a fair amount of potassium, iron, and other minerals. My daughter likes the gelatinous texture when added to liquids, I think it's gross. At 60 cal per tablespoon, if you like it, go for it, it also has a fair amount of poly and monounsaturated fats. No proof it helps with weight loss... in a 12 week study, chia seed eaters didn't lose more weight than non chia seed eaters.
    It was really for the fibre that I considered them.

  • MissyCHF
    MissyCHF Posts: 337 Member
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    tibby531 wrote: »
    I add chia seeds to my butternut squash and sweet potato "porridge" for breakfast. It doesn't add flavor, but it does add texture once it absorbs some of the milk and gels up a bit.
    I have never had that kind of breakfast.........

  • MissyCHF
    MissyCHF Posts: 337 Member
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    Aren't chia seeds a good source of Omega 3's? Anyway I use them and make a chocolate pudding as a snack. Pretty filling!
    That's a new idea to me as well.......
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    Flax seeds/ oil are a great source of vegetarian omega 3’s. I find they help with constipation.

    Chia are a great source of soluble fiber. I might a tablespoon to my oatmeal.
  • wefts
    wefts Posts: 183 Member
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    I add both ( and a bunch of other things including yogurt ) to a huge smoothie each morning and drink a few ounces each hour through the day with ice and crystal light ( storing the rest in the fridge till needed ) , the fiber has made huge difference in my ability to avoid temptation and stay on track .
  • GemstoneofHeart
    GemstoneofHeart Posts: 865 Member
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    I used to add them to things but I just don't have the calories for them any more. As I approach goal weight I have little room for error, and I find these seeds to be high in calorie so I avoid adding them now. I plan to add them back in to my smoothies once I get to maintenance
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
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    I don't really fancy the idea of Chia as you describe it maryanprt but I wondered about whole flax seeds, there seems to be quite a bit in seeded bread so I might try it in my porridge instead of ground flax.

    I think whole flax seeds lose any nutritional benefit, as they go right through you. Maybe fine if it's only fiber you want, though.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
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    I think the benefits of these seeds tend to be oversold, at least re omega 3, as we need particularly EPA and DHA omega 3s, which are in fatty fish, and what the seeds have is ALA. So selling them as good omega 3 sources is a bit questionable, IMO: https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/why-not-flaxseed-oil

    They have lots of decent fat and some protein, but for me aren't worth the calories as they usually don't add to taste (although I enjoy a chia pudding on occasion). There are other seeds I enjoy more than flax almost always, and I find that for me usually eating something caloric I don't appreciate/pay attention to doesn't help me (just adding in hidden fiber beyond getting adequate fiber does nothing for me or my tendency to overeat although if it does for others that's great).

    So anyway, that's why after briefly experimenting I mostly don't consume these now or add in seeds to other dishes where they won't be noticeable (as opposed to putting pumpkin seeds on a salad, or sunflower or so on). But that's just what works for me.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,330 Member
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    I only use them when I want to specifically use them. I have no problem hitting my fat or fiber goals with other foods, so flax and chia would just be taking away some precious calories I could use elsewhere. I do feel like having a chia pudding every now and then, though. As for nutrition, they have nutrients, just like any other food. Nothing special.