Fat, protein and carb % for six pack

Options
2

Replies

  • Lean59man
    Lean59man Posts: 714 Member
    edited November 2017
    Options
    You are lean enough now. Focus on building muscle all over.

    I've already told you this in a previous thread.

    Full-body 3 times week. M-W-F etc. 4 days rest per week.

    Thighs
    Calves
    Chest
    Back
    Shoulders
    Biceps
    Triceps

    Deadlift once per week - 1 set of 12 reps

    1-2 exercises per bodypart for 3 sets of 8-12 reps.
    When you get 12 reps on all three sets, add weight.

    Every 4-6 weeks change up some of your exercises.

    That's it.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,401 MFP Moderator
    Options
    Lean59man wrote: »
    You are lean enough now. Focus on building muscle all over.

    I've already told you this in a previous thread.

    Full-body 3 times week. M-W-F etc. 4 days rest per week.

    Thighs
    Calves
    Chest
    Back
    Shoulders
    Biceps
    Triceps

    Deadlift once per week - 1 set of 12 reps

    1-2 exercises per bodypart for 3 sets of 8-12 reps.
    When you get 12 reps on all three sets, add weight.

    Every 4-6 weeks change up some of your exercises.

    That's it.

    Why would you only deadlift 1x per week? It engages more muscles than almost any other lift.

    If anything, from an efficiency standpoint, your workouts should be focused around deadlift, squat, overhead press and bench.
  • Lean59man
    Lean59man Posts: 714 Member
    edited November 2017
    Options
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Lean59man wrote: »
    You are lean enough now. Focus on building muscle all over.

    I've already told you this in a previous thread.

    Full-body 3 times week. M-W-F etc. 4 days rest per week.

    Thighs
    Calves
    Chest
    Back
    Shoulders
    Biceps
    Triceps

    Deadlift once per week - 1 set of 12 reps

    1-2 exercises per bodypart for 3 sets of 8-12 reps.
    When you get 12 reps on all three sets, add weight.

    Every 4-6 weeks change up some of your exercises.

    That's it.

    Why would you only deadlift 1x per week? It engages more muscles than almost any other lift.

    If anything, from an efficiency standpoint, your workouts should be focused around deadlift, squat, overhead press and bench.

    A typical powerlifting program trains squat, bench, deadlift once per week. Once...per...week.

    Can you deadlift multiple times per week? Yes, but if you are really going heavy (for you) you will soon over train your erectors.

    How about if you deadlift only 10 lbs.? Well then, yes, you can train deadlifts everyday if you want. Twice a day!

    This guy is not a powerlifter. He wants to gain size (I hope) and muscle mass.

    In this case what I recommended for this guy is one all out set of up to 12 reps. If he gets all 12 reps he would add 5-10 lbs. the next week.

    Now, think about it. If he adds 5 lbs. a week in a year he will increase his deadlift by 250 lbs.

    Of course this is not how it works.

    He will still be training his back with pullups, rows or some other back exercise on his workout days but deadlift just once a week.

    If you want to train heavy deadlifts multiple times per week go for it though. See how long you can keep it up.

    This is a peculiarity with the lower back. Heavy deadlifts really kill it.

  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,401 MFP Moderator
    Options
    Lean59man wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Lean59man wrote: »
    You are lean enough now. Focus on building muscle all over.

    I've already told you this in a previous thread.

    Full-body 3 times week. M-W-F etc. 4 days rest per week.

    Thighs
    Calves
    Chest
    Back
    Shoulders
    Biceps
    Triceps

    Deadlift once per week - 1 set of 12 reps

    1-2 exercises per bodypart for 3 sets of 8-12 reps.
    When you get 12 reps on all three sets, add weight.

    Every 4-6 weeks change up some of your exercises.

    That's it.

    Why would you only deadlift 1x per week? It engages more muscles than almost any other lift.

    If anything, from an efficiency standpoint, your workouts should be focused around deadlift, squat, overhead press and bench.

    A typical powerlifting program trains squat, bench, deadlift once per week. Once...per...week.

    Can you deadlift multiple times per week? Yes, but if you are really going heavy (for you) you will soon over train your erectors.

    How about if you deadlift only 10 lbs.? Well then, yes, you can train deadlifts everyday if you want. Twice a day!

    This guy is not a powerlifter. He wants to gain size (I hope) and muscle mass.

    In this case what I recommended for this guy is one all out set of up to 12 reps. If he gets all 12 reps he would add 5-10 lbs. the next week.

    Now, think about it. If he adds 5 lbs. a week in a year he will increase his deadlift by 250 lbs.

    Of course this is not how it works.

    He will still be training his back with pullups, rows or some other back exercise on his workout days but deadlift just once a week.

    If you want to train heavy deadlifts multiple times per week go for it though. See how long you can keep it up.

    This is a peculiarity with the lower back. Heavy deadlifts really kill it.

    What power lifters are you following? The only people who train body parts 1x per week are bodybuilders who are generally on steroids because it extends MPS. If you look at natural body builders, it's ideal to train body points 2 to 3x a week (3x is more ideal for new comers).

    What is ideal is working a variety of rep ranges, hitting body parts 2 to 3x a week. This is driven by the fact that muscle protein synthesis occurs over a 36 to 48 hour period.

    If one is afraid of "over training", then they should consider undulating between low, medium and heavy weights.
  • Lean59man
    Lean59man Posts: 714 Member
    Options
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Lean59man wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Lean59man wrote: »
    You are lean enough now. Focus on building muscle all over.

    I've already told you this in a previous thread.

    Full-body 3 times week. M-W-F etc. 4 days rest per week.

    Thighs
    Calves
    Chest
    Back
    Shoulders
    Biceps
    Triceps

    Deadlift once per week - 1 set of 12 reps

    1-2 exercises per bodypart for 3 sets of 8-12 reps.
    When you get 12 reps on all three sets, add weight.

    Every 4-6 weeks change up some of your exercises.

    That's it.

    Why would you only deadlift 1x per week? It engages more muscles than almost any other lift.

    If anything, from an efficiency standpoint, your workouts should be focused around deadlift, squat, overhead press and bench.

    A typical powerlifting program trains squat, bench, deadlift once per week. Once...per...week.

    Can you deadlift multiple times per week? Yes, but if you are really going heavy (for you) you will soon over train your erectors.

    How about if you deadlift only 10 lbs.? Well then, yes, you can train deadlifts everyday if you want. Twice a day!

    This guy is not a powerlifter. He wants to gain size (I hope) and muscle mass.

    In this case what I recommended for this guy is one all out set of up to 12 reps. If he gets all 12 reps he would add 5-10 lbs. the next week.

    Now, think about it. If he adds 5 lbs. a week in a year he will increase his deadlift by 250 lbs.

    Of course this is not how it works.

    He will still be training his back with pullups, rows or some other back exercise on his workout days but deadlift just once a week.

    If you want to train heavy deadlifts multiple times per week go for it though. See how long you can keep it up.

    This is a peculiarity with the lower back. Heavy deadlifts really kill it.

    What power lifters are you following? The only people who train body parts 1x per week are bodybuilders who are generally on steroids because it extends MPS. If you look at natural body builders, it's ideal to train body points 2 to 3x a week (3x is more ideal for new comers).

    What is ideal is working a variety of rep ranges, hitting body parts 2 to 3x a week. This is driven by the fact that muscle protein synthesis occurs over a 36 to 48 hour period.

    If one is afraid of "over training", then they should consider undulating between low, medium and heavy weights.

    Ok.
  • kazane1
    kazane1 Posts: 264 Member
    edited November 2017
    Options
    kazane1 wrote: »
    tw264d30c6cz.jpg

    Nothing useful: but this photo is gold.

    Thanks.. I thought I would show people where I’m at with my weight lifting journey.
  • kazane1
    kazane1 Posts: 264 Member
    Options
    filbo132 wrote: »
    Personally, in your shoes, I would lean bulk before thinking about abs. Abs may look cool, but without muscles, you will look small. It's not like you walk around all day shirtless or anything like that. Second, your workout program is terrible, you're basically doing a bro split which isn't the most optimal.

    Start with a program like this for a couple of months:
    https://aworkoutroutine.com/the-beginner-weight-training-workout-routine/

    Once you get some experience, learn to use proper form and you're ready for the next level, then go for a program that looks something like this (Upper Body/Lower Body Split), with this program, your hitting your body parts twice a week and you have a good amount of compound movements:
    https://aworkoutroutine.com/the-muscle-building-workout-routine/

    Thanks I’ll look into this for sure!
  • kazane1
    kazane1 Posts: 264 Member
    Options
    Lean59man wrote: »
    You are lean enough now. Focus on building muscle all over.

    I've already told you this in a previous thread.

    Full-body 3 times week. M-W-F etc. 4 days rest per week.

    Thighs
    Calves
    Chest
    Back
    Shoulders
    Biceps
    Triceps

    Deadlift once per week - 1 set of 12 reps

    1-2 exercises per bodypart for 3 sets of 8-12 reps.
    When you get 12 reps on all three sets, add weight.

    Every 4-6 weeks change up some of your exercises.

    That's it.

    Thanks I’ll have to make a new lifting regime that includes this then I think.
  • kazane1
    kazane1 Posts: 264 Member
    Options
    Lean59man wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Lean59man wrote: »
    You are lean enough now. Focus on building muscle all over.

    I've already told you this in a previous thread.

    Full-body 3 times week. M-W-F etc. 4 days rest per week.

    Thighs
    Calves
    Chest
    Back
    Shoulders
    Biceps
    Triceps

    Deadlift once per week - 1 set of 12 reps

    1-2 exercises per bodypart for 3 sets of 8-12 reps.
    When you get 12 reps on all three sets, add weight.

    Every 4-6 weeks change up some of your exercises.

    That's it.

    Why would you only deadlift 1x per week? It engages more muscles than almost any other lift.

    If anything, from an efficiency standpoint, your workouts should be focused around deadlift, squat, overhead press and bench.

    A typical powerlifting program trains squat, bench, deadlift once per week. Once...per...week.

    Can you deadlift multiple times per week? Yes, but if you are really going heavy (for you) you will soon over train your erectors.

    How about if you deadlift only 10 lbs.? Well then, yes, you can train deadlifts everyday if you want. Twice a day!

    This guy is not a powerlifter. He wants to gain size (I hope) and muscle mass.

    In this case what I recommended for this guy is one all out set of up to 12 reps. If he gets all 12 reps he would add 5-10 lbs. the next week.

    Now, think about it. If he adds 5 lbs. a week in a year he will increase his deadlift by 250 lbs.

    Of course this is not how it works.

    He will still be training his back with pullups, rows or some other back exercise on his workout days but deadlift just once a week.

    If you want to train heavy deadlifts multiple times per week go for it though. See how long you can keep it up.

    This is a peculiarity with the lower back. Heavy deadlifts really kill it.

    Thanks for this I will try what you have said
  • Mycophilia
    Mycophilia Posts: 1,225 Member
    Options
    Lean59man wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Lean59man wrote: »
    You are lean enough now. Focus on building muscle all over.

    I've already told you this in a previous thread.

    Full-body 3 times week. M-W-F etc. 4 days rest per week.

    Thighs
    Calves
    Chest
    Back
    Shoulders
    Biceps
    Triceps

    Deadlift once per week - 1 set of 12 reps

    1-2 exercises per bodypart for 3 sets of 8-12 reps.
    When you get 12 reps on all three sets, add weight.

    Every 4-6 weeks change up some of your exercises.

    That's it.

    Why would you only deadlift 1x per week? It engages more muscles than almost any other lift.

    If anything, from an efficiency standpoint, your workouts should be focused around deadlift, squat, overhead press and bench.

    A typical powerlifting program trains squat, bench, deadlift once per week. Once...per...week.

    Can you deadlift multiple times per week? Yes, but if you are really going heavy (for you) you will soon over train your erectors.

    How about if you deadlift only 10 lbs.? Well then, yes, you can train deadlifts everyday if you want. Twice a day!

    This guy is not a powerlifter. He wants to gain size (I hope) and muscle mass.

    In this case what I recommended for this guy is one all out set of up to 12 reps. If he gets all 12 reps he would add 5-10 lbs. the next week.

    Now, think about it. If he adds 5 lbs. a week in a year he will increase his deadlift by 250 lbs.

    Of course this is not how it works.

    He will still be training his back with pullups, rows or some other back exercise on his workout days but deadlift just once a week.

    If you want to train heavy deadlifts multiple times per week go for it though. See how long you can keep it up.

    This is a peculiarity with the lower back. Heavy deadlifts really kill it.

    The biomechanics of the deadlift makes it way more fatiguing to the hamstrings. Unless you dump the bar from lockout, omitting gains from the eccentric portion of the lift. The erectors on the other hand, are only really involved in deadlifts, squats (degree depends on back angle) and rows (if they're not chest supported). Hardly enough to warrant such low volume for the deadlift.

    If the deadlift is destroying your lower back, it might be a quirk of your personal leverages or you might want to reevaluate your deadlift form.
  • thapainmaker
    thapainmaker Posts: 152 Member
    edited November 2017
    Options
    mreichard wrote: »

    [j555kqsu3qb4.jpg
    If it helps, this is me at 16.4% per Dexa scan. I think I'd need to to be at 12% or lower.
    I don’t mean to hijack anyone’s post but what is a dexa scan? I’ve been curious about what I’m at and I can see most of my abs (8 of them) and my veins in my stomach. You think that qualifies for the <10%? Thanks guys
  • LiftHeavyThings27105
    LiftHeavyThings27105 Posts: 2,086 Member
    Options
    Hey, y'all! I will chime in...

    So, I have been very active through out my life (minus a five year time span) and have always been very physical. Be that running (used to run 13 miles in 75 minutes) or training (at 191lbs I could bench 340lbs....not too bad for an at the time 45yo dude).

    I am also prepping for a Power Lifting competition in March, 2018.

    I am following Strong Lifts 5x5 (and, yes - I *TOTALLY* understand that this is not the most efficient program for a Power Lifting program...eyes wide open on that....my goals for this first competition are a little bit different...).

    I have also NEVER used a structured program like Strong Lifts 5x5 before. I am enjoying the structure. And the fact that recovery is such a strong part of this program (as it seems to be with most programs).

    I really like the fact that this program has you doing multiple body parts multiple times a week (well, it has an "A" and a "B" structure....so usually the week "B" is when you are doing Chest, for example, twice....).

    In the three weeks that I have been doing this (and there was a three month layoff before returning to the gym) I am liking this - generally speaking. The once a week Dead Lift scheme of this program is an issue....and I am correcting that (I have made three modifications to this program....one of which is working out four times a week instead of the prescribed three).

    When I was doing things on my own I had a decent program-ish that I followed but I did not have the emphasis on recovery that most of these programs have. And, that is important (especially for a 50yo dude!). I agree with most here that following a prescribed program - from which there are lots and lots of choices - would be something to consider.

    The 'bro split' that you are following will work....but - in my humble opinion - there are better choices. And, I fully subscribe to the notion that everyone is different. The bro split might just be amazing for you. I mean, you def do not need to worry abut walking around without a shirt on at this point in time! But, the gains *could* be better with a more 'effective' training program. And, it goes without saying, that your nutritional plan - first and foremost - needs to be on point (regardless of training program).

    And, since the focus here is on abs....I will remain silent. As fit as I have been all my life - I have NEVER had abs. Ever. Gonna change that (or experience a near death situation trying!).
  • Inspirationalwaterjug
    Options
    The only washboard you need to worry about is the one missing from your house. Clean your bathroom !
  • onehotjeep
    onehotjeep Posts: 3 Member
    Options
    I'm 42 and never had abs my whole life until 3 months ago. Not to take away from all the great advice given and all the complicated work out routines, but for me it was super simple. I cut out all dairy, meat, and processed foods and had abs within 2 months and never done a sit-up or crunch a day in my life. twcducuh383v.jpg
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,751 Member
    Options
    onehotjeep wrote: »
    I'm 42 and never had abs my whole life until 3 months ago. Not to take away from all the great advice given and all the complicated work out routines, but for me it was super simple. I cut out all dairy, meat, and processed foods and had abs within 2 months and never done a sit-up or crunch a day in my life. twcducuh383v.jpg

    Cutting out dairy, meat and "processed" foods made your diet unnecessarily restrictive, so your calorie intake was lower...
  • kazane1
    kazane1 Posts: 264 Member
    Options
    heytimsla wrote: »
    The only washboard you need to worry about is the one missing from your house. Clean your bathroom !

    Haha