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Changes in advertising messages

paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 3,800Member Member Posts: 3,800Member Member
When I was younger there were a lot of ads for Special K ( a brand of cereal, if anyone not familiar with it) and they all featured women who went on diets and then their husband came home and admired their slim figure in their low cut dress, high heels, perfect makeup.

Compared to Nutirgrain in which men were full of energy and muscular in iron man competition or life saving heros

The difference in advetising thrust for 2 very similar products was quite incredible.

Noticed one the other day for Special K - women playing football, in sports gear, in the mud, sweaty, dirty - but healthy and full of energy because Special K, so nutritious.

Really pleased me to see the up to date version compared to the old one.

What do you think and have you noticed any changes in messages for food products?

Disclaimer - I do not eat either Special K or Nutrigrain and this post is not about qualities of product, just the advertising method.

Replies

  • shaumomshaumom Posts: 604Member Member Posts: 604Member Member
    I do notice some changing messages, but ignoring the sexist aspect of the message, and focusing on 'dieting' vs. 'nutritious,' I would wonder how many of the changes are due to regulation changes, actually.

    Right now, there are more regulations on what you can claim about your food, as a company. You cannot say it helps lose weight unless you can prove it, for example, while if it has nutrients, you can typically call it nutritious.

    The dairy industry got in trouble for this a few years back, when they started touting, in commercials, how eating more dairy could help you lose weight. However, their 'study' to back this up was simply people replacing a high calorie snack (like a big fries at McDonalds) with a much lower calorie dairy snack, like a small yogurt. So it did not in any way show that eating dairy helps lose weight, just that eating lower calories did, and they were forced to take the commercials off the air.

    I would imagine some things like Special K may have had to deal with restrictions like this, as well.

    Although it is nice to see an increase in commercials that aren't as focused on women's whole lives revolving around their 'man' and trying to please him.

    We already have too many of those with beer commercials alone. :-P
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 3,800Member Member Posts: 3,800Member Member
    Thanks for your reply

    I dont think the original Special K ad would be breaking any laws - or at least would be easy to tweak it so it didnt outright say you lost weight - just pictorially gave that impression

    I think - or perhaps wishful thinking - that women buy products more for their own health now, not so much just looking good for the man.
  • KickassAmazon76KickassAmazon76 Posts: 339Member Member Posts: 339Member Member
    But... Red bull gives you wings!

    And Axe body spray makes you irresistible!

    All kidding aside... I am looking forward to the day when they get rid of airbrushing and Photoshop. It's nice to see that slowly happening.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 3,800Member Member Posts: 3,800Member Member
    The Road dog - oh boy!!! :o

    Imagine anyone trying to advertise like that these days!!
  • lkpduckylkpducky Posts: 6,208Member Member Posts: 6,208Member Member
    That ad gives me the creeps! Today you'd see that in a science fiction future dystopia movie.
  • mph323mph323 Posts: 1,908Member Member Posts: 1,908Member Member
    "My wife - I think I'll keep her!"

    You have to wonder what would have happened if the french fries were soggy...

    This commercial for Geritol aired in 1972, at the height of the woman's movement, in the middle of the (cynical) discovery by manufacturers that women were a prime target for products that made them feel strong and empowered. Even then it was jaw-dropping. It was destined to live on in infamy in comedy routines, one-liners in sitcoms and popular culture (Jane: "Hey guys, I just ran a new marathon PR!" Dick: "My wife..." General hysterical laughter all around).
  • sarahbumssarahbums Posts: 460Member Member Posts: 460Member Member
    i think ads have gotten better in the last few years. Diet culture is still prominent, but i think they're making progress, albeit slowly. Lately I really like what the Aerie campaign is doing w/ their non-retouched models, for instance.

    and also, go on youtube and check out the "This Girl Can" campaign. it's one of my faves:

    edited April 10
  • lporter229lporter229 Posts: 4,250Member Member Posts: 4,250Member Member
    I realize this is not exactly the intent of this thread, but it's something I've recently noticed just the same.

    Diet Coke has rebranded itself and launched a new ad campaign. They have changed the can to a taller, slimmer can that more closely resembles energy drinks. Their commercials basically say "If you feel like having a Diet Coke, have it, it won't kill you. Life is too short to deny yourself the things you want". I just find it interesting because 20 years ago the message was to drink diet soft drinks because they don't have all of the sugar and calories, so they must be better for you. Then there was this grand crusade against diet soft drinks, so they basically have had to flip the switch and say "Don't worry if it's bad for you. If you like it have it." The mind games involved in advertising never cease to amaze me.
  • canadjinehcanadjineh Posts: 4,024Member Member Posts: 4,024Member Member
    ^^ Also the advertising for sugary pop that has pure cane sugar (more 'natural' so it must be healthy, right??) *eyerollz*
  • whitpaulywhitpauly Posts: 403Member Member Posts: 403Member Member
    Special K was marketed as a weight loss food for years tho,I remember the song 'Thanks to the K you can't pinch an inch on me' back in the day,also remember a tape measure around the K I think
  • nvmomketonvmomketo Posts: 9,264Member Member Posts: 9,264Member Member
    canadjineh wrote: »
    ^^ Also the advertising for sugary pop that has pure cane sugar (more 'natural' so it must be healthy, right??) *eyerollz*

    Remember back when they advertised that cereals had sugar, when sugar was a weight loss tool because it was fat free? Then they swapped sugar out of the name when it became known that added sugar was not a health food.

    Sugar Frosted Flakes became Frosted Flakes.
    Sugar Pops became Corn Pops.
    Sugar Smacks became Honey Smacks.
    Super Sugar Crisp became Super Golden Crisp or Golden Crisps.
    Sugar Chex became Honey nut Chex (I think).
    sarahbums wrote: »
    i think ads have gotten better in the last few years. Diet culture is still prominent, but i think they're making progress, albeit slowly. Lately I really like what the Aerie campaign is doing w/ their non-retouched models, for instance.

    and also, go on youtube and check out the "This Girl Can" campaign. it's one of my faves:


    Nice video! But I have no idea what they are advertising for. :D
  • mangrothianmangrothian Posts: 1,328Member Member Posts: 1,328Member Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    canadjineh wrote: »
    ^^ Also the advertising for sugary pop that has pure cane sugar (more 'natural' so it must be healthy, right??) *eyerollz*

    Remember back when they advertised that cereals had sugar, when sugar was a weight loss tool because it was fat free? Then they swapped sugar out of the name when it became known that added sugar was not a health food.

    Sugar Frosted Flakes became Frosted Flakes.
    Sugar Pops became Corn Pops.
    Sugar Smacks became Honey Smacks.
    Super Sugar Crisp became Super Golden Crisp or Golden Crisps.
    Sugar Chex became Honey nut Chex (I think).
    sarahbums wrote: »
    i think ads have gotten better in the last few years. Diet culture is still prominent, but i think they're making progress, albeit slowly. Lately I really like what the Aerie campaign is doing w/ their non-retouched models, for instance.

    and also, go on youtube and check out the "This Girl Can" campaign. it's one of my faves:


    Nice video! But I have no idea what they are advertising for. :D

    I remember when that advert was released. The UK-based (I think?) "This Girl Can" campaign was to get women to exercise more. It was in response to a study which showed that a high proportion of women were too embarrassed about their body to exercise because of a fear they'd be body-shamed whilst performing said exercise.

    I think the changes in advertising messages are also to do with current popular body image and societal trends. The slim 'heroin chic' figures that many women were aiming for in the 90's were all about being slim and almost waifish. Now, the popularity of the fitter/more muscular/active body-type means that the type of message portrayed and models used for the cereals has changed to match.

    Instead of the message "this helps you look waifish", it's "this gives you the energy to finish your hectic day and still be able to kick butt in your spin class at the end of it".

  • mangrothianmangrothian Posts: 1,328Member Member Posts: 1,328Member Member
    As an FYI, I've just noticed there's now a second "This Girl Can" campaign. I don't know how to post video into the forums, so if somewant wants, feel free too.

    EDIT It's also an Australian campaign now. Seems it's gone from UK to global.
    edited April 16
  • KickassAmazon76KickassAmazon76 Posts: 339Member Member Posts: 339Member Member
    The change in perspective is one of the reasons that I love GRRRL Clothing so much. They push back on stereotypes. They don't air brush or Photoshop their models. They don't have traditional sizes (S, M, L, XL or 0 - 18). AND their MFCEO has killer thighs that she rocks with pride.

    They encourage women to support each other, and to love themselves... They're a game changer. I really hope to see more and more companies do the same!
  • Gisel2015Gisel2015 Posts: 1,888Member Member Posts: 1,888Member Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    canadjineh wrote: »
    ^^ Also the advertising for sugary pop that has pure cane sugar (more 'natural' so it must be healthy, right??) *eyerollz*

    Remember back when they advertised that cereals had sugar, when sugar was a weight loss tool because it was fat free? Then they swapped sugar out of the name when it became known that added sugar was not a health food.

    Sugar Frosted Flakes became Frosted Flakes.
    Sugar Pops became Corn Pops.
    Sugar Smacks became Honey Smacks.
    Super Sugar Crisp became Super Golden Crisp or Golden Crisps.
    Sugar Chex became Honey nut Chex (I think).
    sarahbums wrote: »
    i think ads have gotten better in the last few years. Diet culture is still prominent, but i think they're making progress, albeit slowly. Lately I really like what the Aerie campaign is doing w/ their non-retouched models, for instance.

    and also, go on youtube and check out the "This Girl Can" campaign. it's one of my faves:


    Nice video! But I have no idea what they are advertising for. :D

    IMOP is not advertising anything it's recognizing that a girl/woman can do anything and everything that she wants, can, and is able to do without being limited or judged by archaic societal rules, her gender, race, age or body. More power to that!

    It's refreshing to see that this happening these days and happy that the Stepford Wife’s generation is a thing of the past. Hopefully!!

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