Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Unsolicited advice at the gym

ayson9ayson9 Posts: 18Member, Premium Member Posts: 18Member, Premium Member
When I first started working out at the gym and probably several years afterwards, I used to think that those who give random pieces of tips and advices on the workout I’m doing are just obnoxious cocky and annoying individuals.

This is in regards to those people who look the part in knowing their *kitten* and having the results to prove it.

Honestly, I wish someone had stepped in and gave their tips and tricks when I first started training, it would have filled me in on a lot of stuff I used to do wrong, the injuries I didn’t need to suffer and the setbacks in weight lost that I didn’t know until I started being open about receiving advice.

The most likely cause in my first response to individuals who give unsolicited advice is most likely due to my insecurities and self consciousness about myself just trying to put up a front and assuming that every individual out there is an *kitten* telling me what to do and how to do it, when in reality, they were simply trying to help in making sure I’m doing things properly and effectively in regards to nutrition and training.

I also partly feel that it is just a social norm for anyone who has only begun their fitness journey to react to those unsolicited but most likely helpful advice.

What do you think would be a good practice or approach to be able to help beginner gym goers in offering helpful tips without making them think you’re just a cocky *kitten* thinking their hot *kitten*?
«13

Replies

  • Erik8484Erik8484 Posts: 459Member Member Posts: 459Member Member
    What kind of advice do you want to give people? Have you got examples?
  • Keto_VampireKeto_Vampire Posts: 1,692Member Member Posts: 1,692Member Member
    I would not actively tell someone has bad/incorrect form; there are a ton of exercise variations & what looks like bad form may be an intentional variation or isolation. If someone asks, you tell...had one guy ask me how to not hit the glutes with the barbell when doing a barbell hack squat (all in the grip width).

    There are instances when people just do insane lifts (in which you might want to inform gym personell)...had this old guy deadlifting like 405lbs falling over repeatedly (very stubborn)
    edited April 2018
  • rheddmobilerheddmobile Posts: 4,537Member Member Posts: 4,537Member Member
    If I see someone I don't really know doing something immediately dangerous such as deadlifting with a rounded back I might say something, casually, with a smile. I haven't had trouble being a female giving advice to guys, the guys seem flattered by the attention.

    Apart from that specific circumstance I think the best approach is to get to know people and just talk to them. If you know each other well enough to talk about training, good, if not, probably best to mind your own business.
  • EmmaCaz4EmmaCaz4 Posts: 114Member Member Posts: 114Member Member
    I only give advice if someone looks lost or confused or asks me. Or if someone is doing something stupid... usually some kids who walk up to a bar that's been left heavy loaded and they just think to try press it when it's their first time in a gym etc... gonna end badly!!

    There's a guy in our gym who day in day out will tell people they're doing stuff wrong, bad form blah blah blah and he drives all the regulars mad. He's quite old, scrawny guy but decides to tell people how to train. He doesn't even ask anything about circumstances, he just criticises you and talks at you.
  • kaizakukaizaku Posts: 1,028Member Member Posts: 1,028Member Member
    I'm a qualified gym instructor, even I wouldn't approach anyone. Now, if I'm asked sure I would point at the right direction. The other day I saw a newbie doing concentration curls in a way I never seen before. I didn't say anything. If I did he would have gotten embarrassed, and never to return.
  • SilkysausageSilkysausage Posts: 507Member Member Posts: 507Member Member
    Dear Lord above, just witnessed the worst form during two guys attempting to deadlift as much as possible. I've stopped myself going over to say 'best way to snap city guys' :D
  • rugratz2015rugratz2015 Posts: 593Member Member Posts: 593Member Member
    When I started in the gym I told one of the staff what I wanted and asked her to show me how to use the machines.

    I know of 2 that she didn’t show me how to use properly.

    One I had seen other people use differently and questioned her on it and she was like ‘yeah you can use it that way’ (but still didn’t show me how to adjust for left/right).

    the second, months later, one of the lads I was sharing the machine with corrected it (whilst I was using it). I was grateful for his advice. I probably wouldn’t have done any damage, but I doubt it was too effective either.

    I like the suggestion that you ask people first if they’ve been shown how to use the machine as it at least opens the door to a conversation.
  • fb47fb47 Posts: 1,058Member Member Posts: 1,058Member Member
    ayson9 wrote: »
    When I first started working out at the gym and probably several years afterwards, I used to think that those who give random pieces of tips and advices on the workout I’m doing are just obnoxious cocky and annoying individuals.

    This is in regards to those people who look the part in knowing their *kitten* and having the results to prove it.

    Honestly, I wish someone had stepped in and gave their tips and tricks when I first started training, it would have filled me in on a lot of stuff I used to do wrong, the injuries I didn’t need to suffer and the setbacks in weight lost that I didn’t know until I started being open about receiving advice.

    The most likely cause in my first response to individuals who give unsolicited advice is most likely due to my insecurities and self consciousness about myself just trying to put up a front and assuming that every individual out there is an *kitten* telling me what to do and how to do it, when in reality, they were simply trying to help in making sure I’m doing things properly and effectively in regards to nutrition and training.

    I also partly feel that it is just a social norm for anyone who has only begun their fitness journey to react to those unsolicited but most likely helpful advice.

    What do you think would be a good practice or approach to be able to help beginner gym goers in offering helpful tips without making them think you’re just a cocky *kitten* thinking their hot *kitten*?

    Problem is that people who give advice at the gym aren't always right. I remember being told when I first started lifting that to build muscles you have to eat a lot of food. The person wasn't entirely wrong, but the person who told me didn't bother me to explain about lean bulking and dirty bulking. I figured eating a *kitten* ton of food would do the job simply because a bro at my gym told me to eat a lot of food. I accumulated a lot of fat in my first bulk, it took me 5 months to get lean again.
    edited May 2018
  • Erik8484Erik8484 Posts: 459Member Member Posts: 459Member Member
    A trainer at my gym many years ago told me that I shouldn't deadlift as it was bad for the back. Solid advice!
  • SilkysausageSilkysausage Posts: 507Member Member Posts: 507Member Member
    Erik8484 wrote: »
    A trainer at my gym many years ago told me that I shouldn't deadlift as it was bad for the back. Solid advice!

    Could be the same here as I have SI joint dysfunction but we'll see how it goes. Currently deadlifting a very light 22kg.
  • Erik8484Erik8484 Posts: 459Member Member Posts: 459Member Member
    Erik8484 wrote: »
    A trainer at my gym many years ago told me that I shouldn't deadlift as it was bad for the back. Solid advice!

    Could be the same here as I have SI joint dysfunction but we'll see how it goes. Currently deadlifting a very light 22kg.

    Oh hey you're right, I bet that deadlifting is bad in some circumstances and for some people, but "don't deadlift" is poor blanket advice.

    Good luck with your SI joint issues, I had a chiro that told me my SI joint was bad but (and I'm not sure this is a good thing) I haven't let that stop me!
Sign In or Register to comment.