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Tips for short strength training sessions

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I would like to add strength training to my life, but am not sure what to focus on and would like to add about only about 10 minutes per day right now. (I would like to do more but am in a very busy season of life.) I am thinking I should concentrate on full body strength training (not necessarily each day) unless, based on the regular cardio workouts I do, you recommend otherwise. I exercise for 30-40 minutes every day either Nordic walking (with poles), cycling, or rowing. Does anyone know of a strength training plan that takes about 10 minutes a day? I have a 10 lb kettlebell, weight set with a bench and bar, pull-up bar, and adjustable hand weights.

Replies

  • DancingMoosie
    DancingMoosie Posts: 8,619 Member
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    You could focus on the 5 main lifts: bench press, squat, OHP, deadlifts, rows. If barbells are too heavy, start with dumbbells. I can do 5x5 of these lifts in 30-45 min when lifting heavy, so maybe go lighter, 2x8-10 to start and gradually increase weight and sets over time.
  • Barfly57
    Barfly57 Posts: 333 Member
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    Kettlebell swings and deadlift could be done in 10 minutes. For example, deadlift

    2 × 5 reps very light
    5 reps light
    3 reps moderate
    2 reps heavy
    1 rep max

    Pay attention to form and breathing.
  • Davidsdottir
    Davidsdottir Posts: 1,285 Member
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    Barfly57 wrote: »
    Kettlebell swings and deadlift could be done in 10 minutes. For example, deadlift

    2 × 5 reps very light
    5 reps light
    3 reps moderate
    2 reps heavy
    1 rep max

    Pay attention to form and breathing.

    My DLs take me 45 min to do 9 sets LOL
  • Barfly57
    Barfly57 Posts: 333 Member
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    But, once again:

    Beast! :D
  • rybo
    rybo Posts: 5,424 Member
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    I would like to add strength training to my life, but am not sure what to focus on and would like to add about only about 10 minutes per day right now. (I would like to do more but am in a very busy season of life.) I am thinking I should concentrate on full body strength training (not necessarily each day) unless, based on the regular cardio workouts I do, you recommend otherwise. I exercise for 30-40 minutes every day either Nordic walking (with poles), cycling, or rowing. Does anyone know of a strength training plan that takes about 10 minutes a day? I have a 10 lb kettlebell, weight set with a bench and bar, pull-up bar, and adjustable hand weights.
    You are asking a lot and not wanting to give anything towards it.
    A 10 minute emom or even a 10 minute e2mom could be your best option if you're really only willing to allot that amount of time. Pick one lift and go. Should warm up a few minutes before that too. Don't expect miracles
  • lorrpb
    lorrpb Posts: 11,464 Member
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    It takes me 10 min to warm up good.
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,261 Member
    Options
    I would like to add strength training to my life, but am not sure what to focus on and would like to add about only about 10 minutes per day right now. (I would like to do more but am in a very busy season of life.) I am thinking I should concentrate on full body strength training (not necessarily each day) unless, based on the regular cardio workouts I do, you recommend otherwise. I exercise for 30-40 minutes every day either Nordic walking (with poles), cycling, or rowing. Does anyone know of a strength training plan that takes about 10 minutes a day? I have a 10 lb kettlebell, weight set with a bench and bar, pull-up bar, and adjustable hand weights.

    Would you be willing to trade two of your cardio workout days for full body training days? You could do a simple full body workout in an hour on each of those days and then still be able to devote your full training time to cardio on the other days.
  • littlebear0121
    littlebear0121 Posts: 1,073 Member
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    jemhh wrote: »
    I would like to add strength training to my life, but am not sure what to focus on and would like to add about only about 10 minutes per day right now. (I would like to do more but am in a very busy season of life.) I am thinking I should concentrate on full body strength training (not necessarily each day) unless, based on the regular cardio workouts I do, you recommend otherwise. I exercise for 30-40 minutes every day either Nordic walking (with poles), cycling, or rowing. Does anyone know of a strength training plan that takes about 10 minutes a day?

    Would you be willing to trade two of your cardio workout days for full body training days? You could do a simple full body workout in an hour on each of those days and then still be able to devote your full training time to cardio on the other days.

    Yes, thank you. Good idea.
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,727 Member
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    rybo wrote: »
    I would like to add strength training to my life, but am not sure what to focus on and would like to add about only about 10 minutes per day right now. (I would like to do more but am in a very busy season of life.) I am thinking I should concentrate on full body strength training (not necessarily each day) unless, based on the regular cardio workouts I do, you recommend otherwise. I exercise for 30-40 minutes every day either Nordic walking (with poles), cycling, or rowing. Does anyone know of a strength training plan that takes about 10 minutes a day? I have a 10 lb kettlebell, weight set with a bench and bar, pull-up bar, and adjustable hand weights.
    You are asking a lot and not wanting to give anything towards it.
    A 10 minute emom or even a 10 minute e2mom could be your best option if you're really only willing to allot that amount of time. Pick one lift and go. Should warm up a few minutes before that too. Don't expect miracles

    If you're looking to do it every day, you certainly could break up Starting strength up further.

    Regardless, 10 minutes is not a lot especially if you're warming up appropriately. I know it seems petty, but even 15 minutes would be better, 5 minute warmup circuit, main lift, go about your day.
  • littlebear0121
    littlebear0121 Posts: 1,073 Member
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    Thanks for all of the suggestions. I have a different idea now of what I'd like to do, and more questions. What I would like to do is switch out the cardio workout, and instead do a 45 minute strength training session, two or three times a week. If I have time at the end of the days that I strength train, I will do some rowing since it doesn't matter if it's light outside or not. (I'm worried about maintaining the calorie deficit I need to continue to lose weight.) Here are my questions for you:
    1) I am already satisfied with the amount of muscle I have on my legs and arms. Is there anything in strength training that I should or shouldn't do in order to not add muscle? I feel very stupid asking this, but is there a point to strength training if I don't want to add bulk?
    2) I like Fitness Blender videos. Is there any reason not to do these? Any other suggestions on free guided strength training programs?
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,727 Member
    Options
    Thanks for all of the suggestions. I have a different idea now of what I'd like to do, and more questions. What I would like to do is switch out the cardio workout, and instead do a 45 minute strength training session, two or three times a week. If I have time at the end of the days that I strength train, I will do some rowing since it doesn't matter if it's light outside or not. (I'm worried about maintaining the calorie deficit I need to continue to lose weight.) Here are my questions for you:
    1) I am already satisfied with the amount of muscle I have on my legs and arms. Is there anything in strength training that I should or shouldn't do in order to not add muscle? I feel very stupid asking this, but is there a point to strength training if I don't want to add bulk?
    2) I like Fitness Blender videos. Is there any reason not to do these? Any other suggestions on free guided strength training programs?

    As a female, you're not going to bulk accidentally @Davidsdottir @sardelsa

    Again, Starting strength is pretty much the gold standard for basic strength programs.
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,261 Member
    Options
    Thanks for all of the suggestions. I have a different idea now of what I'd like to do, and more questions. What I would like to do is switch out the cardio workout, and instead do a 45 minute strength training session, two or three times a week. If I have time at the end of the days that I strength train, I will do some rowing since it doesn't matter if it's light outside or not. (I'm worried about maintaining the calorie deficit I need to continue to lose weight.) Here are my questions for you:
    1) I am already satisfied with the amount of muscle I have on my legs and arms. Is there anything in strength training that I should or shouldn't do in order to not add muscle? I feel very stupid asking this, but is there a point to strength training if I don't want to add bulk?

    Strength training while losing weight helps you to prevent losing more muscle than necessary while you lose weight. It also helps you get stronger in general (meaning being able to lift more weight) and helps your bones to get stronger, which is especially important for women whose risk of osteopenia and osteoporosis rise greatly as they age.

    Women gain muscle much more slowly than men, due to our hormones, and that rate gets even slower as we age. Then add in the fact that you are eating in a calorie deficit and you'll find that adding bulk is not anything to be concerned about. You're pretty much going to be lifting for your health.
  • littlebear0121
    littlebear0121 Posts: 1,073 Member
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    As a female, you're not going to bulk accidentally @Davidsdottir @sardelsa

    Again, Starting strength is pretty much the gold standard for basic strength programs. [/quote]

    stannman, Thank you for sharing this. I didn't realize in your first post about Starting Strength that it's a program. I'm looking more into this now.

  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,865 Member
    edited June 2018
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    Thanks for all of the suggestions. I have a different idea now of what I'd like to do, and more questions. What I would like to do is switch out the cardio workout, and instead do a 45 minute strength training session, two or three times a week. If I have time at the end of the days that I strength train, I will do some rowing since it doesn't matter if it's light outside or not. (I'm worried about maintaining the calorie deficit I need to continue to lose weight.) Here are my questions for you:
    1) I am already satisfied with the amount of muscle I have on my legs and arms. Is there anything in strength training that I should or shouldn't do in order to not add muscle? I feel very stupid asking this, but is there a point to strength training if I don't want to add bulk?
    2) I like Fitness Blender videos. Is there any reason not to do these? Any other suggestions on free guided strength training programs?

    I've been lifting regularly for 5.5 years...I don't bulk up because bodybuilding and bulking up is a very deliberate thing with very specific protocols, not to mention a lot of food. You don't just accidentally bulk up and put on a bunch of muscle, it's a very deliberate act and it's a very slow process...like years to put on significant mass, and most certainly isn't going to happen in a calorie deficit...if you're dieting, you are catabolic...bulking on muscle is an anabolic process.

    There are many benefits to resistance training..maintaining muscle mass that you already have...maintaining and/or increasing bone density...getting and being functionally stronger for daily life, etc.

    As mentioned, Starting Strength is a great program...it's a basic barbell program and when I did it ages ago, it would typically take me 30 minutes...more like 45 when the weights got heavier and I had to take longer rest periods between sets.

    Another program you might be interested in is New Rules of Lifting for Women...my wife started back in the weight room with that and it takes a similar 30-45 minutes and is more general fitness oriented. The read in and of itself is good, particularly for women who have an irrational fear of lifting because they're afraid they'll get "bulky"...the read will explain what you are doing and why you are doing it and why you shouldn't be afraid.
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,261 Member
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    As a female, you're not going to bulk accidentally @Davidsdottir @sardelsa

    Again, Starting strength is pretty much the gold standard for basic strength programs.

    stannman, Thank you for sharing this. I didn't realize in your first post about Starting Strength that it's a program. I'm looking more into this now.

    [/quote]

    There's also a book called The Barbell Prescription, which is focused on lifters aged 40+ and gives info on using the Starting Strength methodology. I really like it because it talks about how your experience may be differ from younger lifters and has a ton of suggestions on how to set up your training schedule/rotation for different schedules, abilities, etc.
  • emmamcgarity
    emmamcgarity Posts: 1,594 Member
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    I am older and uncoordinated. For strength training I use light dumbbells and a fitness ball and a Leslie Sansone video (You Can Do Abs) that focuses on core strength. I am also swimming now that the pool is open for the Summer.
  • Davidsdottir
    Davidsdottir Posts: 1,285 Member
    edited June 2018
    Options
    Thanks for all of the suggestions. I have a different idea now of what I'd like to do, and more questions. What I would like to do is switch out the cardio workout, and instead do a 45 minute strength training session, two or three times a week. If I have time at the end of the days that I strength train, I will do some rowing since it doesn't matter if it's light outside or not. (I'm worried about maintaining the calorie deficit I need to continue to lose weight.) Here are my questions for you:
    1) I am already satisfied with the amount of muscle I have on my legs and arms. Is there anything in strength training that I should or shouldn't do in order to not add muscle? I feel very stupid asking this, but is there a point to strength training if I don't want to add bulk?
    2) I like Fitness Blender videos. Is there any reason not to do these? Any other suggestions on free guided strength training programs?

    As a female, you're not going to bulk accidentally @Davidsdottir @sardelsa

    Again, Starting strength is pretty much the gold standard for basic strength programs.

    This is true. I have been bulking for 7 months... eating in a caloric surplus while lifting. This is my fourth bulk, and I'm still relatively small and don't look all that muscular. And this is with actively trying. OP, you are DEFINITELY NOT going to get bulky by lifting and eating in a deficit.

    ETA: in a rather than ina LOL
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,727 Member
    Options


    stannman, Thank you for sharing this. I didn't realize in your first post about Starting Strength that it's a program. I'm looking more into this now.


    Apologize for that. It's also a book by Rippetoe. It's on the third or forth edition, but if you're just looking for the basics with pictures first or second edition is fine, and can be had very inexpensively on amazon.
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,343 Member
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    Thanks for all of the suggestions. I have a different idea now of what I'd like to do, and more questions. What I would like to do is switch out the cardio workout, and instead do a 45 minute strength training session, two or three times a week. If I have time at the end of the days that I strength train, I will do some rowing since it doesn't matter if it's light outside or not. (I'm worried about maintaining the calorie deficit I need to continue to lose weight.) Here are my questions for you:
    1) I am already satisfied with the amount of muscle I have on my legs and arms. Is there anything in strength training that I should or shouldn't do in order to not add muscle? I feel very stupid asking this, but is there a point to strength training if I don't want to add bulk?
    2) I like Fitness Blender videos. Is there any reason not to do these? Any other suggestions on free guided strength training programs?

    As a female, you're not going to bulk accidentally @Davidsdottir @sardelsa

    Again, Starting strength is pretty much the gold standard for basic strength programs.

    This is true. I have been bulking for 7 months... eating in a caloric surplus while lifting. This is my fourth bulk, and I'm still relatively small and don't look all that muscular. And this is with actively trying. OP, you are DEFINITELY NOT going to get bulky by lifting and eating in a deficit.

    ETA: in a rather than ina LOL

    There are lots of us who wish it was as easy to get "bulky" as non-lifters think it is.

    It doesn't happen quickly, it doesn't happen easily and it doesn't happen accidentally.
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,860 Member
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    If you shorten this (https://www.aworkoutroutine.com/the-beginner-weight-training-workout-routine/) to 2 sets instead of 3 and super-set (do an arm set while resting legs), you can get the time down well below 20 minutes if the gym isn't busy or working out at home with multiple sets of equipment (having to swap plates between sets while super-setting would add time at home).