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Over 60 and needing Testosterone boost

jswigartjswigart Posts: 167Member Member Posts: 167Member Member
I am 63 and feel like a boost in testosterone could help me in my muscle gains.
Does anyone recommend any supplements that have proven to work?

Replies

  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,497Member Member Posts: 3,497Member Member
    Get your T levels checked. It's a very simple blood test. If they are, in fact, low then there are multiple safe ways to take T. If not, then you a. don't need more T and b. will have go deal with using ineffective and/or dangerous ways of upping your levels.
  • CowboySarCowboySar Posts: 404Member Member Posts: 404Member Member
    Agree with most above get you levels checked first and see where you are at. If you low your doc may prescribe you meds to help with you T levels. It could be HCG and/or test shots,gel, or pellets.

    Most over the counter is bunk, I do like D'Aspartic Acid though as well as Trib if I was doing it OTC
  • mrslyndamrslynda Posts: 50Member Member Posts: 50Member Member
    I am female, but commenting as a daughter here. It's worth while getting a regular blood test at your age. My father found out he had prostate cancer in his late 60s. My understanding is with men's cancers (and women's) hormones play a big part. So I would only recommend changing your hormone levels under medical supervision. If your test counts are high it can be a sign or cause of prostate cancer.

    Also, to me, you look good. I recommend keep on working on your strength, eat well, don't drink too much, don't smoke. My dad if he was ever into body building would be classed as a hard gainer. So skinny strong guy. His mum fed him well, but couldn't cook, so he learnt to feed himself well. He mostly stopped drinking in his 30s, and quit smoking. He always surfed, or played golf, or worked on building sights. When he started driving for a living, he kept up golf and gardening. Even now he tries to stay active in forced retirement. This is why he is still alive. Not obese, no heart or lung problems and the bones of a 40 year old average. So by all means do the activities you love, eat the food you love, but think of long term health over all. There is no reason you can't be lifting forever if you so wish.
  • Keto_VampireKeto_Vampire Posts: 1,692Member Member Posts: 1,692Member Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    mrslynda wrote: »
    My understanding is with men's cancers (and women's) hormones play a big part. So I would only recommend changing your hormone levels under medical supervision. If your test counts are high it can be a sign or cause of prostate cancer.

    I'm 67 (going on 68) and as a prostate cancer survivor, I need to chime in here.

    If you are "at risk" for protate cancer, it is even more important to consult w/your doc to get a PSA and t-test before taking anything to increase your t-level.

    Testosterone is not the "cause" of prostste cancer BUT it feeds the cancer and one of the treatments calls for medical castration by means of ADT (androgen deprivation theraputic) medications which prevent the production of testosterone or orichetomy (physical castration) which does the same thing, with pretty awfuk side effects for men -- hot flashes, loss of sex drive, ED, loss of bone density, bone fractures and loss of muscle mass and strength.

    Not something you'd want to resort to if you are a body builder.

    BTW, I've had my t--levels,checked and they were/are normal.

    Yep, Testosterone can be reduced into Dihydro-Testosterone (DHT) & contribute to benign prostatic hyperplasia.
    Only way to determine a need is by lab monitoring Testosterone (free, bound, total), Hgb/Hct, PSA. Free is usually the most accurate (active form) and accounts for inactive testosterone bound to Sex Hormone Binding Globulin.
    Testosterone has also been more recently under more scrutiny by the FDA with stroke risk warnings.

    No supplements (even D-aspartic acid) are going to have anywhere close to having a significant (noticeable) impact.

    edited July 2018
  • AnvilHeadAnvilHead Posts: 18,543Member Member Posts: 18,543Member Member
    Not to mention the fact that if you go on TRT, it's basically a lifetime commitment. Exogenous test shuts down your endogenous test production and if you go off it, you'll have the T levels of a eunuch.

    (Still discussing medically approved TRT here - not discussing illegal/black market substances.)
  • AnvilHeadAnvilHead Posts: 18,543Member Member Posts: 18,543Member Member
    CowboySar wrote: »
    Agree with most above get you levels checked first and see where you are at. If you low your doc may prescribe you meds to help with you T levels. It could be HCG and/or test shots,gel, or pellets.

    Most over the counter is bunk, I do like D'Aspartic Acid though as well as Trib if I was doing it OTC

    Looks like D-aspartic acid will do a good job of increasing your fertility and sperm motility, but no improvement in muscle mass, fat mass or power output: https://examine.com/supplements/d-aspartic-acid/

    Trib is great for increasing your libido, but has zero effect upon serum testosterone, lean mass, fat mass or power output: https://examine.com/supplements/tribulus-terrestris/

    So both of those would be great if you're trying to have babies, but they're not going to do jack for boosting test or increasing muscle.
    edited July 2018
  • jessef593jessef593 Posts: 2,147Member Member Posts: 2,147Member Member
    ecjim wrote: »
    Google Biotest / T- Nation - Their products a excellent - Their Alpha Male is good also Rev-V might help Eastcoast Jim

    Oya? Excellent at increasing free testosterone? You know this from personal experience or hear say?
  • jessef593jessef593 Posts: 2,147Member Member Posts: 2,147Member Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    I would advice taking testosterone if you are tested low.

    Also a low test doesn't mean less strength necessarily. Also there are ways to increase your testosterone naturally like having sex more regularly. Its worth a try.

    Are you you offering? Haha.
  • dmankruossdmankruoss Posts: 14Member Member Posts: 14Member Member
    As someone who is on trt, definitely talk to your doctor about it. At your age you can get started on a regimen with a blood test. Just be ready to inject yourself once a week for life.
  • jseams1234jseams1234 Posts: 1,139Member Member Posts: 1,139Member Member
    dmankruoss wrote: »
    As someone who is on trt, definitely talk to your doctor about it. At your age you can get started on a regimen with a blood test. Just be ready to inject yourself once a week for life.

    Sometimes it's not as simple as that. Besides the aversion a lot of people have injecting themselves (and it's NOT a little diabetic gauge needle) a good percentage of folks also need to worry about using an aromatase inhibitor to control estrogen levels. Most modern protocols call for hCG injections too - and they are often more than once a week. Heck, a lot of people still experience a roller-coaster on a weekly protocol and need to pin a lot more often. Sometimes, your endo might not let you self-inject and will go with a two week injection cycle and that is a truly horrific experience of feeling like the Hulk one week and a Princess the next. Yes, there are creams and patches - but they are dubious in their effectiveness for a lot of men.

    What a lot of people don't talk about are the common side-effects. Some, we all know about - the shrinking of the boys (hCG will help this along with helping the deep seated pain in the jewels that some men experience after a while). Skin issues are very common and it's not fun going through bouts of cystic acne as a mature man.

    Some guys are lucky - I've been one of those. I haven't required a prescription AI or hCG in my treatment and my levels are very high "normal" (800+ in my trough) but I still get bouts of chest and back acne - although a mild AI like Arimistane has pretty much kept me in check most of the time.

    Then there are the potential issues with hematocrit levels rising for older men on TRT. I'm on 47 so I've been able to avoid routine blood donations (some guys have to donate blood very regularly to keep Hct in check) and potential problems with aggravating prostate issues. Constant and regular blood work to monitor for those issues and T and E levels.

    Then you have guys who expect TRT is going to act like an AAS cycle - which it is definitely NOT. Yes, I've seen improvement - but most of it was mental and mood related. I can't really say if it helped in the gym or not... if it did it wasn't something I would describe as "night and day" in difference.

    But yes, you are right about the "life" part. Once you start there is very little to no chance of ever stopping after the first year or so.
    edited July 2018
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,497Member Member Posts: 3,497Member Member
    jseams1234 wrote: »
    dmankruoss wrote: »
    As someone who is on trt, definitely talk to your doctor about it. At your age you can get started on a regimen with a blood test. Just be ready to inject yourself once a week for life.

    Sometimes it's not as simple as that. Besides the aversion a lot of people have injecting themselves (and it's NOT a little diabetic gauge needle)...

    For what it's worth, the vast majority of trans men who take testosterone deal with this. From what I can tell most people more or less get over it because the benefits far out-weight not wanting to do an IM injection once every 1-2 weeks. While I don't know that this would apply to cis men, it seems that one is also able to maintain normal T levels injecting subq as opposed to IM. The gauge of the needle is still large given that it's suspended in oil, but it's not nearly as long. This appears to be what a lot of trans youth are doing now and more and more adults are doing it as well (I'll probably switch to that method in the Fall). Note, all of the trans youth that I know of doing this are under very strict medical care for pretty logical reasons (I have a good friend who used to work at one of the trans youth clinics where I live).

    Outside of that, there are also gels and patches and you can get T compounded into a cream as well. Pellets are another option though, again, I don't know what the regimen for cis-men looks like. Those tend to be the options people go for when they aren't willing or able to inject. There's also a long acting T injection that recently got approved by the FDA (I want to say less than 5 years ago) but has been available in a number of other countries for at least 10 years. Unfortunately it's currently very expensive in the US.

    Either way, as I said above, the OP and frankly anyone else, cis-gender or not, who wants to start T needs to be doing so under proper medical care.
  • elenamocovanuelenamocovanu Posts: 17Member Member Posts: 17Member Member
    there is a way to use testosterone but I don't think it's the best idea...
  • Hollis100Hollis100 Posts: 526Member Member Posts: 526Member Member
    mrslynda wrote: »
    I am female, but commenting as a daughter here. It's worth while getting a regular blood test at your age. My father found out he had prostate cancer in his late 60s. My understanding is with men's cancers (and women's) hormones play a big part. So I would only recommend changing your hormone levels under medical supervision. If your test counts are high it can be a sign or cause of prostate cancer.

    Also, to me, you look good. I recommend keep on working on your strength, eat well, don't drink too much, don't smoke. My dad if he was ever into body building would be classed as a hard gainer. So skinny strong guy. His mum fed him well, but couldn't cook, so he learnt to feed himself well. He mostly stopped drinking in his 30s, and quit smoking. He always surfed, or played golf, or worked on building sights. When he started driving for a living, he kept up golf and gardening. Even now he tries to stay active in forced retirement. This is why he is still alive. Not obese, no heart or lung problems and the bones of a 40 year old average. So by all means do the activities you love, eat the food you love, but think of long term health over all. There is no reason you can't be lifting forever if you so wish.

    Good comments, both about exercise and hormones.

    My wonderful late husband had prostate cancer for 13 years. I went with him to most of his medical appointments over those years. Testosterone plays a huge role in the disease. In fact, one treatment is to reduce testosterone because it fuels cancer. Older people going through natural changes where hormones lessen should absolutely talk to a doctor before deciding to take supplements.

  • sgt1372sgt1372 Posts: 3,401Member Member Posts: 3,401Member Member
    Hollis100 wrote: »
    mrslynda wrote: »
    I am female, but commenting as a daughter here. It's worth while getting a regular blood test at your age. My father found out he had prostate cancer in his late 60s. My understanding is with men's cancers (and women's) hormones play a big part. So I would only recommend changing your hormone levels under medical supervision. If your test counts are high it can be a sign or cause of prostate cancer.

    Also, to me, you look good. I recommend keep on working on your strength, eat well, don't drink too much, don't smoke. My dad if he was ever into body building would be classed as a hard gainer. So skinny strong guy. His mum fed him well, but couldn't cook, so he learnt to feed himself well. He mostly stopped drinking in his 30s, and quit smoking. He always surfed, or played golf, or worked on building sights. When he started driving for a living, he kept up golf and gardening. Even now he tries to stay active in forced retirement. This is why he is still alive. Not obese, no heart or lung problems and the bones of a 40 year old average. So by all means do the activities you love, eat the food you love, but think of long term health over all. There is no reason you can't be lifting forever if you so wish.

    Good comments, both about exercise and hormones.

    My wonderful late husband had prostate cancer for 13 years. I went with him to most of his medical appointments over those years. Testosterone plays a huge role in the disease. In fact, one treatment is to reduce testosterone because it fuels cancer. Older people going through natural changes where hormones lessen should absolutely talk to a doctor before deciding to take supplements.

    Good point 4 men at risk 4 protate cancer (PCa).

    I was diagnosed w/PCa at age 60. Treated w/an advanced method of radiation delivery and have been cancer free for 10 yrs.

    However, many men who are treated (usually w/surgery) abd who suffer a recurrence are then subject to chemo AND andro deprivation medication. The latter being a method of chemical castration which suppresses the production of testosterone which predictable negative "side effects."

    So, it you are a man "at risk" of PCa, you should also have your PSA tested annually before seeking/using an testosterone supplementation.
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