Stationary Bike?

OK. I have neuropathy in the balls of my feet which make it painful at times to walk. Neurologist suggested a stationary bike for exercise.

Is it worth the investment? any recommendations? (Not looking to see how much I can spend).

What say you?

Replies

  • tbright1965
    tbright1965 Posts: 852 Member
    Member of a gym where you could try one out before you invest?

    I'd want to know I could try it out before I spent some serious coin on something that would become an expensive clothes tree.
  • Fflpnari
    Fflpnari Posts: 975 Member
    get a free trial at a gym and go test them out
  • orangegato
    orangegato Posts: 6,570 Member
    Won't the pressure on the foot sole from peddaling still make your pain worse?
    Try any neuropathic pain meds yet?
  • fdhunt1
    fdhunt1 Posts: 222 Member
    Orangegato:

    Pain is only on the front ball of the foot. Do those pain meds really work?
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,811 Member
    Would be best to try before you buy. Can you get a one day gym pass perhaps?

    Proper cycling shoes might help protect your feet as they have rigid soles.

    There's a really wide range of quality and price, beware a lot of low end ones are pretty hopeless with flimsy construction and/or very rudimentary resistance methods.

    "Worth the investment" is very subjective, improved health is priceless but on the other hand a piece of equipment that turns into a dust collector is worthless.

    If you are just thinking of using one for general fitness maybe look for a used gym quality spinning bike to give better value than a same price new domestic market stationary bike.
  • LivingtheLeanDream
    LivingtheLeanDream Posts: 13,345 Member
    I bought one over a year ago - best buy ever! :smiley: I get my workout done in the mornings, catch up on tv at the same time :smile: this is the one I bought of Amazon and I would highly recommend it. I did a lot of research on different brands before I bought:

    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-E3WKSAZKSQY/WTEm82qkw2I/AAAAAAAAMeA/iWAHs3smkLk9Ew1eVXoaOKY0eNIx_3yJwCJoC/w530-h942-p-rw/Screenshot_20170602-091156.png

    I do know people who have bought them though and they just sit in the corner gathering dust! its not for everyone, but for me its the perfect way to get my cardio in daily and in a short amount of time. Its a pretty good calorie burn imo.
  • trochanter
    trochanter Posts: 76 Member
    Do you have a decent push bike? If so, it might be worth considering turbo trainer.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/tacx-blue-matic-folding-trainer/

  • Lisa_ASD_Mummy
    Lisa_ASD_Mummy Posts: 36 Member
    I have one and use it all the time, I watch netflix and bike, its a great calorie burn and as it is at home I don't have to leave the house and go anywhere, with a kid with autism its not easy to get out so it works really well for me, I like it, whether or not it will help your feet or be something you can do I can't say, as previous posters have said it might be worth trying one in a gym and seeing if you can do it before investing. Have you thought of swimming? the ultimate none impact cardio, I swim for a club once a week and I love it.
  • orangegato
    orangegato Posts: 6,570 Member
    fdhunt1 wrote: »
    Orangegato:

    Pain is only on the front ball of the foot. Do those pain meds really work?

    There are several neuropathic pain meds available by the trade names Neurontin, Lyrica and Cymbalta to name a few. They are not addictive and not narcotics. Yes, they can help, but everyone responds to varying degrees. Some have great benefit, some have none, some in between. They won't take away numbness or lack of feeling, but can help w/ tingling, burning, other neuropathic pains. The neurologist should have mentioned.