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How much mass gain from strength training realistic?

_nikkiwolf__nikkiwolf_ Posts: 1,255Member Member Posts: 1,255Member Member
Hi everyone,

in lots of articles about strength training I keep reading that muscles are denser than fat, and you shouldn't focus on the number on the scale. But I have trouble finding any numbers on how much weight gain would be realistic?

Background info: I've been maintaining at my goal weight since more than three years now, with running as my main exercise, and without tracking my food in the last two years except around the holidays. This year in April I've started doing exercise videos with dumbbells 3-4 times per week at home (this kind of training: https://www.fitnessblender.com/videos/get-strong-upper-body-workout-for-strength-with-descending-reps ; https://www.fitnessblender.com/videos/build-a-booty-workout-strength-and-pilates-workout-for-butt-and-thighs ). The weights I'm using are not super heavy, depending on the exercise between 4-16 pounds per hand, a bit heavier now than when I started doing them five month ago. I got a compliment recently that my arms look much stronger :smile: , so I'd like to tell myself those exercises are doing something.

On the other hand, the measurements I took (hip, waist, thighs) haven't changed, while I've gained about 3 pounds. Could that amount of gain in just a few month be "muscle mass" (especially since women have a harder time building muscle, and my dumbbells are not as heavy as what people lift in a gym), or am I just deluding myself and should start cutting back on my calorie intake for a few weeks to get back to my old maintenance weight?

E.t.a: I guess I will go back to tracking food & exercise calories for a few weeks to be sure, I'm just curious on what kind of muscle mass gain people would expect from strength training.
edited October 12

Replies

  • jemhhjemhh Posts: 14,162Member Member Posts: 14,162Member Member
  • _nikkiwolf__nikkiwolf_ Posts: 1,255Member Member Posts: 1,255Member Member
    Thanks for the replies, really interesting reading!
  • mom23mangosmom23mangos Posts: 2,289Member Member Posts: 2,289Member Member
    If your measurements aren’t changing and you are noticing positive visual differences, I’d continue to ignore the scale IMO.
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