Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Daily Consistency Challenge

dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
Maybe nobody else will want to do this but I'm going to give it a try. Logging in from this day to the end of the year. A full 365 days of logging in and logging progress.

Anyone else want to join in?
«1

Replies

  • MadisonMolly2017MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member
    Sure!

    May 26, 2012 237.7 Highest Weight
    March 2013. 232.8
    March 2014 208
    Jan 1, 2015 221.6 Began 2-3 year wt loss journey

    Jan 1, 2016. 228.3
    Feb16, 2017 221
    Jan 1, 2018 190.2
    Hit 1st Goal Wt: 169 June 14, 2018
    Hit 2nd Goal Wt: 155 Nov 22 Thanksgiving

    Jan 1, 2019 155 lbs

    Next Goal: 150lbs


  • dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
    That's great! But I was talking about logging into MFP every day for 365 in 2019 and progress at the end of the 365 days. But that's okay. Great news is great news!
  • MadisonMolly2017MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member
  • sgleanmachinesgleanmachine Posts: 1Member, Premium Member Posts: 1Member, Premium Member
    I’m in. Logged in today. Good challenge idea.
  • Kahniab13Kahniab13 Posts: 5Member Member Posts: 5Member Member
    I like this idea, once you get into the practice of logging, you begin to see what trends you have in your diet and they can make better choices for the next week. Then continually improve. I'm down. Count this as day one!
  • dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
    Kahniab13 wrote: »
    I like this idea, once you get into the practice of logging, you begin to see what trends you have in your diet and they can make better choices for the next week. Then continually improve. I'm down. Count this as day one!

    Thats kind of the idea. I log in every day and then come here and simply share a message or a howdy. Today's message is: DAY TWO TO A NEW YOU! :) I like poetry lol. The messages are like mini motivationals.

  • dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
    DAY TWO TO A NEW YOU
    Have you ever wondered if you can really change? Sometimes it seems impossible, doesn't it? And especially if you have more than one change going on, like changing your eating habits, working out, and logging in!

    Below is based on some things I've read.

    Step 1: Focus on One New Habit
    You may have several things going on, but one thing should be your focus change. It will depend, of course, on greatest need but you'll often find that your changes are linked together.

    Step 2: Form a new habit? Commit for a MINIMUM of 30 days.
    I realize the challenge is to log on to MFP daily for 365 days, but make yourself a shorter goal of the first 30 and it should become a life pattern!

    Step 3: Anchor Your New Habit to an Established Habit
    I found that losing the first 20 pounds last year set a stage for creating a dietary change that I could bring into this challenge. Maybe you've been on MFP for years but not regularly logged in. Make logging in part of your established lifestyle. Do not say to yourself "well maybe later". Later never comes!

    Step 4: Take Baby Steps
    This is a good idea! Just log in and say HI on here to let me (and anyone else) know we're not alone, if that's all you want to do or feel comfy doing. As long as you say at least a howdy!

    Step 5: Make a Plan for Obstacles
    Load up your phone app! Be ready to make logging in something you automatically do, even before checking email :)

    Step 6: Create Accountability for Your Habit
    That's kind of what this challenge is about. If you're like me, you could log in and be totally turtle and just log yourself but soon, without any interactions, you'll find some reason not to get involved and before you know it...you've forgotten to log in or put it off.....This thread may help? I hope so!

    Step 7: Reward Important Milestones
    First 30 day anniversaries are a cool milestone. In fact, every month is a milestone!

    Step 8: Build a New Identity
    Logging in and saying howdy is a good start, but hey we would like to know the person behind the howdy too! If you've always been shy, or maybe you've been brash? This is a good place to come out of your shell or learn to tuck back in a bit to encourage others with a "nice to see you!"

    Anyway these are the steps I came across. The new you will come. Day two is just the beginning!

  • dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
    Ok :)

    You're welcome to hang out and log in though. Sincerely- all welcome here :)
  • dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
    Checking in with myself apparently lol Thats ok!
  • dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
    here I am again! Tried avocado toast for the first time and it's not half bad!
  • colleensuvcolleensuv Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
    I'm in. MFP has been something I've been off an on for years. I would like to be consistent so this challenge will help. I've also turned notification on so I will be dinged by all messages on this board!
  • dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
    colleensuv wrote: »
    I'm in. MFP has been something I've been off an on for years. I would like to be consistent so this challenge will help. I've also turned notification on so I will be dinged by all messages on this board!

    Thanks for joining in. I've got a consistency issue as well and will appreciate helps and encouragement also. Here's something I came across:

    Rule #1: Never tell yourself “I’m not motivated.”
    That’s not the real problem, unless you really don’t want to lose weight or live a healthy lifestyle. As long as you do want these things, you have all the motivation you need.

    It may be true that sometimes you don’t want to exercise, or that you really want to stop and get fast food rather than cooking dinner. That’s understandable, but it doesn’t mean you’re not motivated. It just means that you want two different and opposing things, and you have to make a decision. Telling yourself that you lack motivation is just a way of denying that you really do have a choice. It makes the problem seem mysterious and out of your control, and it makes you feel less powerful than you really are, because you lack something (the motivation) you need. Not true!

    In the long run you’ll do better if you acknowledge that the choice is yours to make. You can choose either option, without making excuses or inventing a theory like “lack of motivation” to justify it. Then, pay attention to how you feel about the choice you made, and decide whether that is how you want to feel most of the time.

    Being consistent does not mean being perfect. (There are going to be days when you decide to do something other than stick to your exercise and diet routine, and that’s fine.) But becoming consistent does mean giving yourself the power to choose.


    Rule #2: Build momentum one step at a time.
    It’s never easy to change old habits or start new routines. Studies show that it takes anywhere from 21 to 40 days to really turn a new behavior into a persistent habit. And during that time, you’re going to have to work at it pretty diligently—even when you don’t feel like it.

    The key to long term consistency is building momentum. The hardest part is always getting things started. But once you’re moving, staying in motion and picking up speed becomes a lot easier. There are a lot of ways you can gradually build momentum during those first few weeks. Here are some examples:

    Start with something that’s pretty easy to manage and build up from there. Set a goal of one 10-minute exercise session per week. Then increase it to two 10-minute sessions. Gradually add minutes to each workout (and eventually add one or more additional workouts to your week), until you're exercising as long and as frequently as you should in order to reach your goals. The simple act of setting aside some time for exercise every day, no matter how little, and sticking to it is enough to start building the habit.

    Find an accountability buddy—someone who knows about your plan and is willing to give you a push when you feel like slacking off.

    Join a Team or Challenge here at SparkPeople. It’s always harder to let someone else down than it is to let yourself off the hook.

    Employ an excuse buster. Find a friend, family member, or [MFP] member whose judgment and opinion you respect. Each time you find yourself thinking about skipping an exercise session or blowing your meal plan, write down the reason for your choice. Share this reason with your excuse buster and get her honest opinion about whether the reason for your choice is reasonable or just an excuse. You’ll probably find that this makes it a lot harder for you to believe your own rationalizations.

    Rule #3: Always have a plan B.
    Because life is unpredictable and complicated, you need to have plan B ready—even before you actually need it. Plan B is an alternative way to stay consistent with your goals when your regular routine (or something else) doesn’t work out as planned. Obviously, you can’t foresee every single problem that might come up. But most of the time, the things that get in your way are things that happen fairly often—like kids getting sick, extra hours at work, or days when you just don’t feel very energetic. Those surprises won't throw you off track if you plan ahead. For example, have a friend or family member lined up to stay with your kids so you can make it to the gym; stock your freezer with some healthy meals when you're short on time; stash your exercise clothes at the office for a quick workout when you can't get away.

    Put a little time into identifying the most common problems that disrupt your healthy routine, and plan (in advance) what you can do to handle these problems without sacrificing your diet and exercise routine. Then all you’ll have to do is put your plan B into action.


    Following these three simple rules will help you overcome some common obstacles while building the momentum you need to stay consistent. At the very least, you’ll be able to take all those lemons that life hands you, and make some good (and diet-friendly) lemonade out of them.

    My personal plan B is to have MFP on my phone in case I'm not with my main computer or laptop!
    Still need to develop a sick days strategy though! Ideas welcome!
  • Mustang358WoodMustang358Wood Posts: 1Member Member Posts: 1Member Member
  • dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
    Today is our day out day. Hubby and I go out for a small lunch together and we usually split the meal. So this could be cool! Welcome to the new comers!
  • MadisonMolly2017MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member
    dauchsmom wrote: »
    Ok :)

    You're welcome to hang out and log in though. Sincerely- all welcome here :)

    Thanks! @dauchamom

  • MadisonMolly2017MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member
    dauchsmom wrote: »
    Today is our day out day. Hubby and I go out for a small lunch together and we usually split the meal. So this could be cool! Welcome to the new comers!

    Sounds fun! Enjoy!
  • MadisonMolly2017MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member
    dauchsmom wrote: »
    colleensuv wrote: »
    I'm in. MFP has been something I've been off an on for years. I would like to be consistent so this challenge will help. I've also turned notification on so I will be dinged by all messages on this board!

    Thanks for joining in. I've got a consistency issue as well and will appreciate helps and encouragement also. Here's something I came across:

    Rule #1: Never tell yourself “I’m not motivated.”
    That’s not the real problem, unless you really don’t want to lose weight or live a healthy lifestyle. As long as you do want these things, you have all the motivation you need.

    It may be true that sometimes you don’t want to exercise, or that you really want to stop and get fast food rather than cooking dinner. That’s understandable, but it doesn’t mean you’re not motivated. It just means that you want two different and opposing things, and you have to make a decision. Telling yourself that you lack motivation is just a way of denying that you really do have a choice. It makes the problem seem mysterious and out of your control, and it makes you feel less powerful than you really are, because you lack something (the motivation) you need. Not true!

    In the long run you’ll do better if you acknowledge that the choice is yours to make. You can choose either option, without making excuses or inventing a theory like “lack of motivation” to justify it. Then, pay attention to how you feel about the choice you made, and decide whether that is how you want to feel most of the time.

    Being consistent does not mean being perfect. (There are going to be days when you decide to do something other than stick to your exercise and diet routine, and that’s fine.) But becoming consistent does mean giving yourself the power to choose.


    Rule #2: Build momentum one step at a time.
    It’s never easy to change old habits or start new routines. Studies show that it takes anywhere from 21 to 40 days to really turn a new behavior into a persistent habit. And during that time, you’re going to have to work at it pretty diligently—even when you don’t feel like it.

    The key to long term consistency is building momentum. The hardest part is always getting things started. But once you’re moving, staying in motion and picking up speed becomes a lot easier. There are a lot of ways you can gradually build momentum during those first few weeks. Here are some examples:

    Start with something that’s pretty easy to manage and build up from there. Set a goal of one 10-minute exercise session per week. Then increase it to two 10-minute sessions. Gradually add minutes to each workout (and eventually add one or more additional workouts to your week), until you're exercising as long and as frequently as you should in order to reach your goals. The simple act of setting aside some time for exercise every day, no matter how little, and sticking to it is enough to start building the habit.

    Find an accountability buddy—someone who knows about your plan and is willing to give you a push when you feel like slacking off.

    Join a Team or Challenge here at SparkPeople. It’s always harder to let someone else down than it is to let yourself off the hook.

    Employ an excuse buster. Find a friend, family member, or [MFP] member whose judgment and opinion you respect. Each time you find yourself thinking about skipping an exercise session or blowing your meal plan, write down the reason for your choice. Share this reason with your excuse buster and get her honest opinion about whether the reason for your choice is reasonable or just an excuse. You’ll probably find that this makes it a lot harder for you to believe your own rationalizations.

    Rule #3: Always have a plan B.
    Because life is unpredictable and complicated, you need to have plan B ready—even before you actually need it. Plan B is an alternative way to stay consistent with your goals when your regular routine (or something else) doesn’t work out as planned. Obviously, you can’t foresee every single problem that might come up. But most of the time, the things that get in your way are things that happen fairly often—like kids getting sick, extra hours at work, or days when you just don’t feel very energetic. Those surprises won't throw you off track if you plan ahead. For example, have a friend or family member lined up to stay with your kids so you can make it to the gym; stock your freezer with some healthy meals when you're short on time; stash your exercise clothes at the office for a quick workout when you can't get away.

    Put a little time into identifying the most common problems that disrupt your healthy routine, and plan (in advance) what you can do to handle these problems without sacrificing your diet and exercise routine. Then all you’ll have to do is put your plan B into action.


    Following these three simple rules will help you overcome some common obstacles while building the momentum you need to stay consistent. At the very least, you’ll be able to take all those lemons that life hands you, and make some good (and diet-friendly) lemonade out of them.

    My personal plan B is to have MFP on my phone in case I'm not with my main computer or laptop!
    Still need to develop a sick days strategy though! Ideas welcome!

    Love this article. I can attest that all of these ideas work! Baby steps!
  • MadisonMolly2017MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member
    397 Day MFP Logging Streak
    460 Daily Weigh In on my scale app

    Consistency is KEY!

    Self-honesty in tracking is fundamental.

    Habit I’m currently working on: My brain, lately, has wanted the fun of eating out, but I feel physically worse off (queasy, tummy issues, etc.) so I’m working to remember that & that the high sodium (even if I ask them to hold the salt), unknown, and likely less healthy, fats than I use at home, and inaccurate calories & nutrient data. Also it’s expensive. And time-consuming. And often, now that it’s winter, people are coughing...

    I think I’m almost back on track with this. Going to cook a large amount of a dish I like & freeze for those times that I feel like eating out!

    Small habits!
  • dauchsmomdauchsmom Posts: 40Member Member Posts: 40Member Member
    Thanks for posting Madison!! Great thoughts! And I know what you mean about eating out. I spoiled myself too early in 2019 by dining out on a day when I suppose I could have pulled from the fridge instead. And, I saw a distinct gain in water weight as well as puffiness! I do the cook n freeze too. A lot of this is casserole type meals, though not all, that I've "slimified" and lowered the salt on.

    If you live in the US and are near a dollar store, they often carry foil containers with lids that you can use to freeze and store. They're cheap! And disposable!!!
  • MadisonMolly2017MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,268Member, Premium Member
    Thanks @dauchsmom for that great tip!

    I hope all is going well for you❗️
«1
Sign In or Register to comment.