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Do you read with a sense of skepticism?

NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 7,862Member Member Posts: 7,862Member Member
I'm exhausted from New Year's Eve and from a lot of exercise today. I've been reading to stay awake until a respectable hour to go to bed. There was an article about how dairy is dangerous and addictive, should come with warning labels, gives you leaky gut syndrome, and makes your car break down.

This quote early on got me in a ranting mood:

While milk and dairy products, such as cheese and yoghurt, are good sources of protein and calcium and can form part of a healthy, balanced diet, as Dr Michael Greger, from NutritionFacts.org, put it to me: "There's no animal on the planet that drinks milk after weaning - and then to drink milk of another species even doesn't make any sense."

Problem is, I have a cat, years old and fully weaned, who loves goat and cow milk. I mean, it's also a problem that leaky gut syndrome isn't actually a thing.

There's a thread going on in the health section, somebody is slammed at having read that deli meat will give you cancer.

When you read things, especially health and diet related, do you have a healthy sense of skepticism?
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Replies

  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 62Member Member Posts: 62Member Member
    Yep BS detector is fully activated. If it says always, all, lose more than 2 pounds a week, gain more than a couple pounds of muscle a month, etc the information is thrown out of my brain.

    As @launenq1991 mentions WHO, USDA, etc information is in my line of trust.
  • midlomel1971midlomel1971 Posts: 923Member Member Posts: 923Member Member
    I do EVERYTHING with a healthy dose of skepticism.
  • LounmounLounmoun Posts: 8,361Member Member Posts: 8,361Member Member
    I would say I read critically. I am aware that there are a lot of articles that are there to manipulate rather than just inform.
    I look at if statements are opinion or fact. I look at the source and if more than one reputable source is in agreement.
    I think about if it jives with my own experience.


  • mycatjaspermycatjasper Posts: 7Member Member Posts: 7Member Member
    I very rarely read 'entertainment' articles based on hyping minor research findings related to veganism/meat etc! Things have normally been taken out of context to make them sound shocking or novel. Everything should be read with a pinch of salt (and that's coming from me as a science communicator!!). I always read the original research paper - or at least an article describing the research paper in a non-biased way that has references. If it's not referenced (the claims are not backed up to reputable scientific research papers) then I don't read it.
  • Crafty_camper123Crafty_camper123 Posts: 897Member Member Posts: 897Member Member
    Unless it comes from a reputable source such as NHI, WHO, CDC, or Mayo Clinic or something like that, I am automatically suspicious of what I am reading. The research in gut permeability seems to be in its infancy. From what I can gather it does seem to be a thing that effects some people. But, it's not something scientists understand fully yet. I do not believe it is as pervasive and as common as some of these bloggers would have us beleive. Take hashimotos for example. I was just recently diagnosed myself (high antibodies). And I went on a quest to find out more about it, and what kind of things I could do to support my health naturally, and maybe slow down the inevitable progression of the disease. I was immediatly bombarded with articles telling me about how gluten is secretly killing me and causing ALL of my ailments. It took a lot of digging to finally produce a peer reviewed study about the link between celiac and hashimoto's on the NIH website. (If need be in the name of citation I can go find it again. Let me know) They frequently run together, but one isn't caused by the other. And while yes, going gluten free does seem to help SOME people with Hashimoto's disease, it does not help everyone and anyone. If I stopped at the first few search results, they would have me believing I need to throw out all the gluten (and in some cases dairy) in my house immediatly or suffer the consequences. Disclosure: I did go GF for a while to see if it helped with some digestive issues I was having. It didnt. Nor did it magically cure anything else for me.

    TLDR: I read from several resources to form an educated opinion. I have a higher level of skepticism for bloggers or so called doctors then I do from more reputable medical research sources such as NIH and others of the like.
  • lmsaalmsaa Posts: 52Member Member Posts: 52Member Member
    Always skepticism. Realize how difficult evaluating studies is for most people. First, evaluation of scientific trial methodology and statistical significance is a skill that not everyone has. Also, many scientific full articles are behind a paywall and inaccessible to those without a university library pass or scientific company subscription; unless we want to spend around $35 per article, we rely on secondary reporting about a study to go beyond the abstract.
  • RoxieDawnRoxieDawn Posts: 15,415Member Member Posts: 15,415Member Member
    Healthy skepticism, grain of salt, etc.... :smiley:

    No dairy debate from me, I eat yogurt, cheese, drink chocolate milk almost every day. Can't give it up, I am one of those at my age something is going to knock me out at some point, might as well enjoy my dairy in the mean time.
    edited January 2
  • nvmomketonvmomketo Posts: 11,410Member Member Posts: 11,410Member Member
    I find that it is best to go to the source and read re actual studies, then I might go and read some critiques of both sides and follow their logic and studies. Eventually conclusions can be drawn.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 7,862Member Member Posts: 7,862Member Member
    I'm exhausted from New Year's Eve and from a lot of exercise today. I've been reading to stay awake until a respectable hour to go to bed. There was an article about how dairy is dangerous and addictive, should come with warning labels, gives you leaky gut syndrome, and makes your car break down.

    This quote early on got me in a ranting mood:

    While milk and dairy products, such as cheese and yoghurt, are good sources of protein and calcium and can form part of a healthy, balanced diet, as Dr Michael Greger, from NutritionFacts.org, put it to me: "There's no animal on the planet that drinks milk after weaning - and then to drink milk of another species even doesn't make any sense."

    Problem is, I have a cat, years old and fully weaned, who loves goat and cow milk. I mean, it's also a problem that leaky gut syndrome isn't actually a thing.

    There's a thread going on in the health section, somebody is slammed at having read that deli meat will give you cancer.

    When you read things, especially health and diet related, do you have a healthy sense of skepticism?

    But it's somehow okay to take that same "another species" milk and consume the cheese and yoghurt made from them? That distinction always makes me chuckle. According to Michael Greger (who is a quack, btw) shouldn't we all be consuming human breast milk cheese then?

    Or eat their flesh. If the body is good to eat why wouldn't the milk be?

    I mean there theoretically could be some reason that cow milk was actually poisonous to humans, but we wouldn't be drinking a lot of it every day if that was the case.
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