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Planet Fitness ?

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  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 281Member Member Posts: 281Member Member
    PF probably okay as long as one doesn't want barbells or heavier dumbbells. FYI, for those interested in personal training the one locally doesn't require any certification, other locations may vary.

    Here are the requirements from an Indeed ad:

    Qualifications/Requirements

    A passion for fitness and health!
    Upbeat and positive attitude.
    Punctuality and reliability is a must.
    Exceptional customer service skills; able to interact in a positive and professional way with members and co-workers, exceeding the member’s expectations.
    Strong listener with the ability to empathize and problem solve.
    Demonstrate diplomacy in all interactions while using appropriate behavior and language.
    Current CPR Certification required.
    Exceptional knowledge of Exercise Science.
    High School diploma/GED equivalent required.
    Must be 18 years of age or older.
  • CarvedTonesCarvedTones Posts: 2,341Member Member Posts: 2,341Member Member
    I guess a lot depends on how they decide if a candidate meets the requirement "Exceptional knowledge of Exercise Science"
  • azzeazsaleh5429azzeazsaleh5429 Posts: 77Member Member Posts: 77Member Member
    I had planet fitness membership for 1 year and only went there twice to sign up and to cancel. I then was turned on to a certain kind of membership with my health insurance where I pay 30/month and could goto many gyms that are different companies. I have been sticking to 1 gym lately but I like the option of being able to choose.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 281Member Member Posts: 281Member Member
    I guess a lot depends on how they decide if a candidate meets the requirement "Exceptional knowledge of Exercise Science"

    Probably depends on local management. Some might require an exercise science degree and some a pulse.
  • spiritballoonspiritballoon Posts: 7Member Member Posts: 7Member Member
    I have been a member of PF for almost 6 years. I used to go 6 days a week, then my grandmothers health took a decline (my wife and I were her caregivers). I took a 2 year (almost to the day) break as her health continued to decline.I had lost almost 80# and gained most of it back. I started going back 5-6 days a week in December 2018, and I had forgotten how much I enjoyed/looked forward to going to the gym. I did a design your own plan session with the personal trainer, and we set up a plan (with a re-evaluation in February). Personally, I love PF... it is cheap, and the location near my house has plenty of machines, and like others have said, never have to wait more than a minute or 2 for weight machines etc. The trainer is always talking to me when I am there, encouraging me etc... That is one of the things I like best is the trainer.. he took the time to find out about me (health issues, injuries etc) and what my goals were.. with no judgement.. I never feel any judgement when I go there.
    edited January 11
  • Boba_14626Boba_14626 Posts: 859Member Member Posts: 859Member Member
    As a seasoned lifter I will say this. Any gym is what you make of it. I used to have a PF membership years ago and it served me well. I just outgrew it because of the lack of free weights. i would say go for it. I do miss a 24 hour gym.
  • lkpduckylkpducky Posts: 8,682Member Member Posts: 8,682Member Member
    I guess a lot depends on how they decide if a candidate meets the requirement "Exceptional knowledge of Exercise Science"

    Probably not much if they also give a minimum age of 18 and a high school diploma/GED. How long does it take/what educational background is needed to get the major certifications?
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 36,169Member Member Posts: 36,169Member Member
    lkpducky wrote: »
    I guess a lot depends on how they decide if a candidate meets the requirement "Exceptional knowledge of Exercise Science"

    Probably not much if they also give a minimum age of 18 and a high school diploma/GED. How long does it take/what educational background is needed to get the major certifications?

    You don't need any education or background in exercise science to get certified to be a personal trainer. You just take a certification course through ACE, NASM, ISSA, ACSM, or NSCA and pass the certification test. The only pre-requisites are 18 years old with high school diploma, CPR and AED certifications. Most of the courses run around 9 weeks I think. This is why it can be hard to find a good PT.

    That said, I do know several good ones and most of them have at least bachelors degrees in exercise science...but those folks don't typically work for a gym, they are private contractors and rent space from a gym.
  • caindove11caindove11 Posts: 63Member Member Posts: 63Member Member
    Joined planet fitness almost two months ago and I like it so far. If you are looking for a chill atmosphere, I would recommend it.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 281Member Member Posts: 281Member Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    lkpducky wrote: »
    I guess a lot depends on how they decide if a candidate meets the requirement "Exceptional knowledge of Exercise Science"

    Probably not much if they also give a minimum age of 18 and a high school diploma/GED. How long does it take/what educational background is needed to get the major certifications?

    You don't need any education or background in exercise science to get certified to be a personal trainer. You just take a certification course through ACE, NASM, ISSA, ACSM, or NSCA and pass the certification test. The only pre-requisites are 18 years old with high school diploma, CPR and AED certifications. Most of the courses run around 9 weeks I think. This is why it can be hard to find a good PT.

    That said, I do know several good ones and most of them have at least bachelors degrees in exercise science...but those folks don't typically work for a gym, they are private contractors and rent space from a gym.

    I took a prep course for the ACE test just for my own knowledge through adult ed at the local JC. it was 15 weeks 3 hours in class a week.
  • urloved33urloved33 Posts: 3,361Member Member Posts: 3,361Member Member
    I love pf. I have been a member for about a year before that I was a 5 year mber at one of those huge expensive fitness centers and I don't miss it..i got to pf in two different states and I love them all. never had a bad experience at pf.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 36,169Member Member Posts: 36,169Member Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    lkpducky wrote: »
    I guess a lot depends on how they decide if a candidate meets the requirement "Exceptional knowledge of Exercise Science"

    Probably not much if they also give a minimum age of 18 and a high school diploma/GED. How long does it take/what educational background is needed to get the major certifications?

    You don't need any education or background in exercise science to get certified to be a personal trainer. You just take a certification course through ACE, NASM, ISSA, ACSM, or NSCA and pass the certification test. The only pre-requisites are 18 years old with high school diploma, CPR and AED certifications. Most of the courses run around 9 weeks I think. This is why it can be hard to find a good PT.

    That said, I do know several good ones and most of them have at least bachelors degrees in exercise science...but those folks don't typically work for a gym, they are private contractors and rent space from a gym.

    I took a prep course for the ACE test just for my own knowledge through adult ed at the local JC. it was 15 weeks 3 hours in class a week.

    Still not very much time...NASM is 9 weeks. In my experience, trainers who just get their certs and go work for a big commercial gym aren't that good...the one's I know who are good have additional education...always exceptions of course.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 281Member Member Posts: 281Member Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    lkpducky wrote: »
    I guess a lot depends on how they decide if a candidate meets the requirement "Exceptional knowledge of Exercise Science"

    Probably not much if they also give a minimum age of 18 and a high school diploma/GED. How long does it take/what educational background is needed to get the major certifications?

    You don't need any education or background in exercise science to get certified to be a personal trainer. You just take a certification course through ACE, NASM, ISSA, ACSM, or NSCA and pass the certification test. The only pre-requisites are 18 years old with high school diploma, CPR and AED certifications. Most of the courses run around 9 weeks I think. This is why it can be hard to find a good PT.

    That said, I do know several good ones and most of them have at least bachelors degrees in exercise science...but those folks don't typically work for a gym, they are private contractors and rent space from a gym.

    I took a prep course for the ACE test just for my own knowledge through adult ed at the local JC. it was 15 weeks 3 hours in class a week.

    Still not very much time...NASM is 9 weeks. In my experience, trainers who just get their certs and go work for a big commercial gym aren't that good...the one's I know who are good have additional education...always exceptions of course.

    Do you know how many classroom hours are in the 9 weeks? I also considered NASM cert but nothing live in my area, just home study.

    Ageee 45 hours of class plus the prep time on your own for the test isn't much. If I decided to train people for money I'd most likely get some more education even though I've been acrive.in gym sertings.for over 40 years
    edited January 11
  • JaxxieKatJaxxieKat Posts: 346Member Member Posts: 346Member Member
    I have a basic membership, which kind of stinks, because my home location doesn't have the cool plyo center or stairmills, whilst every other one in my area does. I ended up investing in a cheap incline bench and some dumbbells up to 20lbs and work out at home.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 2,187Member Member Posts: 2,187Member Member
    That is one of the things I like best is the trainer.. he took the time to find out about me (health issues, injuries etc) and what my goals were.. with no judgement.. I never feel any judgement when I go there.

    Sounds like every other gym I've been at.
  • CarvedTonesCarvedTones Posts: 2,341Member Member Posts: 2,341Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    That is one of the things I like best is the trainer.. he took the time to find out about me (health issues, injuries etc) and what my goals were.. with no judgement.. I never feel any judgement when I go there.

    Sounds like every other gym I've been at.

    I have been to a few other gyms over the years, and feeling judged is pretty common. Most of it is implicit; people probably think it's nice to encourage people they don't know to do more and get "better". Some get a little pushier about it than others telling you that you need to go with more weight to get any benefit out of the machine you are using or whatever. At some gyms, trainers are the worst about it. The trainers at PF never do that, and I mean never; it's obviously part of employee training. If you want to encourage people you don't know well, tell them they are doing great not that they could do better.
    edited January 13
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 36,169Member Member Posts: 36,169Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    That is one of the things I like best is the trainer.. he took the time to find out about me (health issues, injuries etc) and what my goals were.. with no judgement.. I never feel any judgement when I go there.

    Sounds like every other gym I've been at.

    I have been to a few other gyms over the years, and feeling judged is pretty common. Most of it is implicit; people probably think it's nice to encourage people they don't know to do more and get "better". Some get a little pushier about it than others telling you that you need to go with more weight to get any benefit out of the machine you are using or whatever. At some gyms, trainers are the worst about it. The trainers at PF never do that, and I mean never; it's obviously part of employee training. If you want to encourage people you don't know well, tell them they are doing great not that they could do better.

    I pay my PT $50 per session...if he wasn't pushing me (which is where you progress), I'd fire his *kitten*...he wouldn't be doing his job.
  • CarvedTonesCarvedTones Posts: 2,341Member Member Posts: 2,341Member Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    That is one of the things I like best is the trainer.. he took the time to find out about me (health issues, injuries etc) and what my goals were.. with no judgement.. I never feel any judgement when I go there.

    Sounds like every other gym I've been at.

    I have been to a few other gyms over the years, and feeling judged is pretty common. Most of it is implicit; people probably think it's nice to encourage people they don't know to do more and get "better". Some get a little pushier about it than others telling you that you need to go with more weight to get any benefit out of the machine you are using or whatever. At some gyms, trainers are the worst about it. The trainers at PF never do that, and I mean never; it's obviously part of employee training. If you want to encourage people you don't know well, tell them they are doing great not that they could do better.

    I pay my PT $50 per session...if he wasn't pushing me (which is where you progress), I'd fire his *kitten*...he wouldn't be doing his job.

    That is solicited advice. I completely agree with you; when you go to the PT seeking advice and paying for it on top of that, he should push if that's what you asked for. The issue is when trainers or other folks make unsolicited comments that are not entirely positive. If you feel the need to tell someone who didn't ask for a critique "Nice job, but..." keep your but out of it.
    edited January 13
  • clicketykeysclicketykeys Posts: 3,140Member Member Posts: 3,140Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    That is one of the things I like best is the trainer.. he took the time to find out about me (health issues, injuries etc) and what my goals were.. with no judgement.. I never feel any judgement when I go there.

    Sounds like every other gym I've been at.

    I have been to a few other gyms over the years, and feeling judged is pretty common. Most of it is implicit; people probably think it's nice to encourage people they don't know to do more and get "better". Some get a little pushier about it than others telling you that you need to go with more weight to get any benefit out of the machine you are using or whatever. At some gyms, trainers are the worst about it. The trainers at PF never do that, and I mean never; it's obviously part of employee training. If you want to encourage people you don't know well, tell them they are doing great not that they could do better.

    Ehh. I think that overstates it a little. It's not quite a "you're awesome just the way you are!!" kind of happy-fluffy-feeling. It's more "you're doing great; keep going." At PF, a lot of the customers are more casual, and not giving up may be more of a concern than working harder.
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