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Working through pain?

rfajitas12345rfajitas12345 Posts: 12Member Member Posts: 12Member Member
I started weight training about 6 months ago. Ever since then, it's been an onslaught of minor injuries and pain. A sprained wrist, lower back pain, knee issues, etc.

What has been your experience with this? Do you push through the workout even with the pain? It seems that if I were to stop and let my body recover, I'd probably only go to the gym once a month.

Looking for everyone's thoughts and opinions.

Replies

  • urloved33urloved33 Posts: 3,188Member Member Posts: 3,188Member Member
    over the years lifting, training, sports - I have had my share of injuries and pain - including a back that goes out every so often,. I am not the type of person to "do nothing" so I would do whatever I could within the limits of or to work around the pain...and I still do. in 2007 I slipped and fell on the concrete floor in Home Depot and that put me out of full commission for about a year so for that set of injuries I simply would go to the pond and float til over a period of time I could move...then more and then swim...and so on.
    edited January 10
  • KeladelphiaKeladelphia Posts: 782Member Member Posts: 782Member Member
    I'll be honest due to the nature of my sport I almost always have some type of pain be it wrist, knee, back or shoulder but real pain isn't normal for the general weightlifting population. I don't know if its good advice but I generally wrap my knees or wrists and push through the pain as long as I know its not a serious injury and that it's just training aches and pains. If it's an injury I rest that particular part of my body until its healed enough that I can work on stability exercises for it but I still train regardless

    Are you warming up and mobilizing properly? Are you focusing on adding in stability exercises into your routine for your pain points? Have you seen a PT to rule out any serious injuries or mobility issues that could be a contributing factor to your training pains? Those few things have really helped me minimize training pain.
  • anothermfpuseranothermfpuser Posts: 64Member Member Posts: 64Member Member
    I'll assume you mean pain from injury and not muscle soreness from pushing it in the gym. In my book these are very different. Also my experience is coming from someone who was never an athlete or strong guy in past years.

    About 4 years ago I was full-blaze ahead no matter what the cost and learned the hard way it wasn't sustainable. To me, there's no benefit to exercise if it results in injury.

    Sometimes it's not having a well balanced program so you're always working the same body parts and as with anything that gets overused - bad things can happen.

    After being sidelined a number of times and recognizing middle age feels a little different than my 20's, I've learned to moderate and balance what I do for exercise and take recovery days. For me that means a balance of different forms of cardio, weightlifting (total body dumbbell routines) and Pilates (mostly reformer).

    If you keep pressing matters being injured, I think you only make matters worse.

    I'm sure you will get many different view points on this as we all come from different places and have different starting points.
  • rfajitas12345rfajitas12345 Posts: 12Member Member Posts: 12Member Member
    Thanks for the feedback! I'm doing Stronglifts 5x5 and it's the first time I'm hearing of "stability" exercises and warm-ups.
  • born_of_fire74born_of_fire74 Posts: 699Member Member Posts: 699Member Member
    Aches and pains are one thing and can be pushed through however actual injuries are another. I tore my hamstring at the beginning of September and saw a physiotherapist right away. She had me take a complete break from crossfit for just over 7 weeks. She assigned me a whole bunch of band and bodyweight exercises and stretches to do for targeted recovery that amounted to over an hour of (very painful) work each day so it's not like I was doing nothing during that break.

    After those 7 weeks, I was given the OK to go back to crossfit but with some restrictions--no jumping, no cutting action, gentle deadlifts only, no ATG squats--while continuing with the (less painful) physio. I was only doing crossfit 2-3 times a week at this point because it was a lot when coupled with over an hour of physio daily. Fast forward to the week before Christmas: the physiotherapist streamlined my program down to about half of what it was and greenlit jumping and deadlifting however still no cutting action or ATG squats--not sure those will ever be on the menu again without knee surgery :( With the reduced physio, I returned to crossfit full time in the New Year.

    So, after about four months, I'm more or less back to normal though I still do the physio over and above my regular routine. I could have just stopped exercising altogether or tried to work through it on my own but I believe I will be stronger and better off in the long run having seen the physiotherapist. If nothing else, she has me working to correct a lot of my form issues, some of which prolly contributed to me injuring myself in the first place and I'll return to her for more development when I have fully mastered the program she has me on now.

    TLDR: seeing a physiotherapist is a good idea if you are injured rather than simply normal sore.
  • CowboySarCowboySar Posts: 375Member Member Posts: 375Member Member
    As above, I work through pain but not an injury. If it is an injury I will work around the injury.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 7,386Member Member Posts: 7,386Member Member
    It would be beneficial to work around pain and/or injury. There is plenty of literature and studies showing that injuries heal faster and reoccur much less if one continues to train at appropriate volume with useful intensity.

    For instance if it hurts to squat at depth with your normal stance because of a hamstring strain, then try different a different stance. Or try a varient of the squat.

    If you squat low bar and pain gets worse than try high bar. If you pull sumo, try conventional. If it hurts to go to full depth, then pin squat at partial depth. So on.

    Basically find a way to train that the pain is tolerable and gets better as you train.

    I would also state that if you are injured it's almost always poor load management. Correct that, and you will be on a better track.

    If you are running SL 5×5 for more than 3-4 months, it's likely this might be some of the cause since you would be grinding out a LP that isn't made to progress after one maybe two deloads at best. More advanced programming would be beneficial regardless if this is the case.

    edited January 10
  • rfajitas12345rfajitas12345 Posts: 12Member Member Posts: 12Member Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    It would be beneficial to work around pain and/or injury. There is plenty of literature and studies showing that injuries heal faster and reoccur much less if one continues to train at appropriate volume with useful intensity.

    For instance if it hurts to squat at depth with your normal stance because of a hamstring strain, then try different a different stance. Or try a varient of the squat.

    If you squat low bar and pain gets worse than try high bar. If you pull sumo, try conventional. If it hurts to go to full depth, then pin squat at partial depth. So on.

    Basically find a way to train that the pain is tolerable and gets better as you train.

    I would also state that if you are injured it's almost always poor load management. Correct that, and you will be on a better track.

    If you are running SL 5×5 for more than 3-4 months, it's likely this might be some of the cause since you would be grinding out a LP that isn't made to progress after one maybe two deloads at best. More advanced programming would be beneficial regardless if this is the case.

    What is LP?
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 7,386Member Member Posts: 7,386Member Member
    Linear Progression.
  • GiddyupTimGiddyupTim Posts: 2,693Member Member Posts: 2,693Member Member
    Doesn't seem to me that those movements are the type likely to cause injury. They're not easy but they are relatively simple, controlled movements.
    Are you sure you are not trying to lift too heavy? Maybe you need to back off, use a bit lighter weights, and then work up in weight as your body adapts, gets use to the stress and grows in strength?
  • IsETHomeIsETHome Posts: 121Member Member Posts: 121Member Member
    I started weight training about 6 months ago. Ever since then, it's been an onslaught of minor injuries and pain. A sprained wrist, lower back pain, knee issues, etc.

    What has been your experience with this? Do you push through the workout even with the pain? It seems that if I were to stop and let my body recover, I'd probably only go to the gym once a month.

    Looking for everyone's thoughts and opinions.

    Um if you didn't have pain before and you do now, find another sport. I live in chronic spine/tailbone pain, and believe me there's nothing I wouldn't give to be out of that pain. If you are causing your pain by your actions - stop them.
  • Teabythesea_Teabythesea_ Posts: 129Member Member Posts: 129Member Member
    IsETHome wrote: »

    Um if you didn't have pain before and you do now, find another sport. I live in chronic spine/tailbone pain, and believe me there's nothing I wouldn't give to be out of that pain. If you are causing your pain by your actions - stop them.

    Why stop completely when they could simply find the cause and fix it? Weight training isn’t supposed to cause pain and injuries.

  • akboy58akboy58 Posts: 137Member Member Posts: 137Member Member
    I’ve always loved working out, but early on, in my 20s-30s, I had constant problems with injuries and pain, so much so that I eventually gave up. Fast forward to a major life reboot in 2013: 90-lb weight loss, and back in the gym, but THIS time under the supervision of a really good trainer. I still have a fair amount of pain, and am prone to nagging injuries, but I now know what my various structural deficiencies and muscle imbalances are, and my trainer helps me work around them, and through them. If you are having similar problems, get yourself evaluated by a good physiatrist, and if necessary into the hands of a good physical therapist and/or trainer with a PT background.
  • tonyfastz06tonyfastz06 Posts: 35Member, Premium Member Posts: 35Member, Premium Member
    so... you're a noob at the gym and you're on a 5x5 strength training regimen? Honestly, your issues are probably stacked one on top of the other...

    1) Would recommend you get on a less intense hypertrophy based program, either push pull legs or upper/lower body split and decrease the weight which leads me into my next point
    2) There is a only very very small possibility that your form is acceptable enough to be pushing the heaviest of weights and this can amount to not only significant numbers of small aches and pains but also strong possibility of a major injury
    3) are you EATING and supplementing right?
    4) are you using soft tissue work like massage on a regular basis?
    5) have you enlisted a trainer to provide you feedback on your technique and form?
    6) start there... the list could grow more yet...
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,392Member Member Posts: 5,392Member Member
    When I started up I hired a professional to ensure I had perfect form. We worked for the first few weeks with light weights or just a broom stick. You can hide bad form under weight, where this is highlighted when lifting light weights.

    Soreness is normal and expected - your body is attempting to grow and develop new tissue to support new activity. Pain on the other hand is not normal and your body signalling to stop. Rest, heal, and come back stronger.

    Soreness lasts 24-72 hours and originates in the muscles. Pain is often sharp and striking and originates in the muscles and joints.

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