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The Case For Killing The Camp Fire

NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 8,595Member Member Posts: 8,595Member Member
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  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,757Member Member Posts: 5,757Member Member
    Meh.

    Other than forest fires the other reasons are really reaching. Not setting the forest on fire should be sufficient grounds.

  • vanityy99vanityy99 Posts: 601Member Member Posts: 601Member Member
    I live in a fairly densely populated area where there is not much space between houses. On every cool evening, when you'd love to have the windows open, half the neighborhood lights up backyard bonfires. Our next-door neighbor has a fire pit literally right below our bedroom window.

    My husband has respiratory issues, and even with all the windows closed, he has trouble breathing when wood smoke is in the air. I have appealed to our neighbors for help, but nothing must get in the way of their fun. Summer and fall evenings are very stressful as we wait for the smoke to start pouring in.

    I get having a fire (responsibly) while camping or if you are on a large piece of land with no neighbors close by. But it has no place in urban/suburban environments. It's just pollution.

    The smoke still gets into the house with your windows closed??
  • k8eekinsk8eekins Posts: 1,781Member Member Posts: 1,781Member Member
    Do you think a camp fire is an essential part of a night out?

    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-case-for-killing-the-campfire?utm_source=pocket-newtab

    Enjoying the fire in the backyard or the rooftop or by the beach, especially when out camping has been an essential and normal feature for me and most neighbours, not that I overdo it, strictly for the holidays and only on cold nights for our singalongs. Reading through the article from attached link, has forced me to review what is allowed on our developed and undeveloped camp sites, now looking up portable smokeless fire pits.

    Thank you!
  • GuyanaGold21GuyanaGold21 Posts: 53Member Member Posts: 53Member Member
    I just returned from a wonderful 4-day camping trip (no Wi-Fi, cell service, etc.). The small evening campfire (in a metal fire ring, locally purchased fire wood, etc.) was the perfect way for us to relax after a day on the river. Thankfully, I've never lived where fire bans were common; and have found most campers to be very respectful of the resources they enjoy. Ironically, my asthma was much less problematic at camp than it is living daily in a Clean Air Act non-attainment area where wood fires are very uncommon!

  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,003Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,003Member, Premium Member
    BEER GOOD!!! FIRE BAD!!! lol
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Posts: 1,819Member Member Posts: 1,819Member Member
    I have every sympathy for the couple who have smoke getting into their home even with the window closed. I have problems with chemicals and the stink brought home from conservation days has had me gagging, even the laundry residue from next doors newly hung laundry made me ill, as well as many smells in between.

    I first found something battery operated for our home which called itself "clean air", which worked well. I moved on to a mains powered uv air cleaner. I now even use a small unit, which fits in the cigar lighter in the car, (I have not other use for the socket, giggle) It makes a real difference. Some of us are more susceptible to health issues and need to do more to protect ourselves.
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