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Too Much HIIT Cause Cortisol- Fact or Fiction

raven56706raven56706 Posts: 867Member, Premium Member Posts: 867Member, Premium Member
I am working out with a trainer currently and alot of his exercises is HIIT workouts. 5 Round, 7 Rounds and etc.

I read alot that too much HIIT cause cortisol.

Then what is a good amount of HIIT to prevent this.

Replies

  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 8,544Member Member Posts: 8,544Member Member
    No more than 2x per week, to get ready for an A race. As part of your training plan, not just because.
  • jlklemjlklem Posts: 251Member Member Posts: 251Member Member
    Yes, it’s a stress hormone, but stress also leds to adaptation
  • raven56706raven56706 Posts: 867Member, Premium Member Posts: 867Member, Premium Member
    Azdak wrote: »
    “Cortisol” has become a four-letter word, but in fact, it’s actions are complex and dynamic, and the average person should not try to overthink it because there is about a 90% chance they will be wrong.

    The questions are: are you comfortable with the HIIT exercise routine and is it designed to meet your goal? A lot of trainers emphasize HIIT because it’s the trendy thing to do, and many of their clients expect it. IMO, HIIT workouts should not be the base of one’s routine—they should be the occasional “sharpeners” to push you to the next level.

    But they have their place. If you are doing more “base” workouts on your own, then 2 HIIT type workouts in a week is pushing it IMO, but it’s not necessarily too much. It really depends on your body, your goals, etc.

    But I wouldn’t evaluate the routines based on fears of “cortisol”.

    my goals are basically to burn fat. Thats what my trainer and i have the goal for. some of the exercises are mostly push ups, squats, jumping jacks and some weights.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 8,544Member Member Posts: 8,544Member Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    Azdak wrote: »
    “Cortisol” has become a four-letter word, but in fact, it’s actions are complex and dynamic, and the average person should not try to overthink it because there is about a 90% chance they will be wrong.

    The questions are: are you comfortable with the HIIT exercise routine and is it designed to meet your goal? A lot of trainers emphasize HIIT because it’s the trendy thing to do, and many of their clients expect it. IMO, HIIT workouts should not be the base of one’s routine—they should be the occasional “sharpeners” to push you to the next level.

    But they have their place. If you are doing more “base” workouts on your own, then 2 HIIT type workouts in a week is pushing it IMO, but it’s not necessarily too much. It really depends on your body, your goals, etc.

    But I wouldn’t evaluate the routines based on fears of “cortisol”.

    Agree with everything you said here. I also think HIIT is the most misused protocol out there today. It is primarily a protocol for increasing Vo2 max but it is used as a calorie burner and muscle building strategy. It's not really all that effective for those things compared to other methods.

    Every word of this.
  • sijomialsijomial Posts: 14,764Member Member Posts: 14,764Member Member
    raven56706 wrote: »
    Azdak wrote: »
    “Cortisol” has become a four-letter word, but in fact, it’s actions are complex and dynamic, and the average person should not try to overthink it because there is about a 90% chance they will be wrong.

    The questions are: are you comfortable with the HIIT exercise routine and is it designed to meet your goal? A lot of trainers emphasize HIIT because it’s the trendy thing to do, and many of their clients expect it. IMO, HIIT workouts should not be the base of one’s routine—they should be the occasional “sharpeners” to push you to the next level.

    But they have their place. If you are doing more “base” workouts on your own, then 2 HIIT type workouts in a week is pushing it IMO, but it’s not necessarily too much. It really depends on your body, your goals, etc.

    But I wouldn’t evaluate the routines based on fears of “cortisol”.

    my goals are basically to burn fat. Thats what my trainer and i have the goal for. some of the exercises are mostly push ups, squats, jumping jacks and some weights.

    Then you are doing the wrong exercise routine and also looking in the wrong place to drive your fat loss.
    If you seriously want exercise to be the driving force behind creating your calorie deficit then be prepared to dedicate a whole lot of time to it and HIIT isn't suitable for long duration exercise.
  • raven56706raven56706 Posts: 867Member, Premium Member Posts: 867Member, Premium Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    raven56706 wrote: »
    Azdak wrote: »
    “Cortisol” has become a four-letter word, but in fact, it’s actions are complex and dynamic, and the average person should not try to overthink it because there is about a 90% chance they will be wrong.

    The questions are: are you comfortable with the HIIT exercise routine and is it designed to meet your goal? A lot of trainers emphasize HIIT because it’s the trendy thing to do, and many of their clients expect it. IMO, HIIT workouts should not be the base of one’s routine—they should be the occasional “sharpeners” to push you to the next level.

    But they have their place. If you are doing more “base” workouts on your own, then 2 HIIT type workouts in a week is pushing it IMO, but it’s not necessarily too much. It really depends on your body, your goals, etc.

    But I wouldn’t evaluate the routines based on fears of “cortisol”.

    my goals are basically to burn fat. Thats what my trainer and i have the goal for. some of the exercises are mostly push ups, squats, jumping jacks and some weights.

    Then you are doing the wrong exercise routine and also looking in the wrong place to drive your fat loss.
    If you seriously want exercise to be the driving force behind creating your calorie deficit then be prepared to dedicate a whole lot of time to it and HIIT isn't suitable for long duration exercise.


    ok then what are you suggesting? i am obviously on a calorie deficit so thats primary step one
  • sijomialsijomial Posts: 14,764Member Member Posts: 14,764Member Member
    raven56706 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    raven56706 wrote: »
    Azdak wrote: »
    “Cortisol” has become a four-letter word, but in fact, it’s actions are complex and dynamic, and the average person should not try to overthink it because there is about a 90% chance they will be wrong.

    The questions are: are you comfortable with the HIIT exercise routine and is it designed to meet your goal? A lot of trainers emphasize HIIT because it’s the trendy thing to do, and many of their clients expect it. IMO, HIIT workouts should not be the base of one’s routine—they should be the occasional “sharpeners” to push you to the next level.

    But they have their place. If you are doing more “base” workouts on your own, then 2 HIIT type workouts in a week is pushing it IMO, but it’s not necessarily too much. It really depends on your body, your goals, etc.

    But I wouldn’t evaluate the routines based on fears of “cortisol”.

    my goals are basically to burn fat. Thats what my trainer and i have the goal for. some of the exercises are mostly push ups, squats, jumping jacks and some weights.

    Then you are doing the wrong exercise routine and also looking in the wrong place to drive your fat loss.
    If you seriously want exercise to be the driving force behind creating your calorie deficit then be prepared to dedicate a whole lot of time to it and HIIT isn't suitable for long duration exercise.


    ok then what are you suggesting? i am obviously on a calorie deficit so thats primary step one

    I suggest selecting an exercise routine to match your fitness, health, sporting and enjoyment goals. All of which continue way after you get to goal weight.

    If you seriously want to burn a lot of calories then steady state cardio of about two hours at a moderately hard pace but sustainable pace would do the trick. Any more than 2 hours and you will probably have to start fuelling yourself. Any more than moderately hard intensity will probably drive your hunger up.
    It will aslo be mind numbingly dull if done indoors and doubtful you would want to sustain it.

    Do you see why a personal trainer wouldn't give you this routine? (No input required from him/her at all for one.)

  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 8,544Member Member Posts: 8,544Member Member
    raven56706 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    raven56706 wrote: »
    Azdak wrote: »
    “Cortisol” has become a four-letter word, but in fact, it’s actions are complex and dynamic, and the average person should not try to overthink it because there is about a 90% chance they will be wrong.

    The questions are: are you comfortable with the HIIT exercise routine and is it designed to meet your goal? A lot of trainers emphasize HIIT because it’s the trendy thing to do, and many of their clients expect it. IMO, HIIT workouts should not be the base of one’s routine—they should be the occasional “sharpeners” to push you to the next level.

    But they have their place. If you are doing more “base” workouts on your own, then 2 HIIT type workouts in a week is pushing it IMO, but it’s not necessarily too much. It really depends on your body, your goals, etc.

    But I wouldn’t evaluate the routines based on fears of “cortisol”.

    my goals are basically to burn fat. Thats what my trainer and i have the goal for. some of the exercises are mostly push ups, squats, jumping jacks and some weights.

    Then you are doing the wrong exercise routine and also looking in the wrong place to drive your fat loss.
    If you seriously want exercise to be the driving force behind creating your calorie deficit then be prepared to dedicate a whole lot of time to it and HIIT isn't suitable for long duration exercise.


    ok then what are you suggesting? i am obviously on a calorie deficit so thats primary step one

    For example, yesterday I burned 1,163 extra calories (give or take 2.5%) riding a bike for two hours. It was sunny, and I did a route with a lot of twisty hills because riding downhill through switchbacks is so much fun. Guess how I'm about to spend my lunch hour?

    Find something you enjoy, that makes time stand still.
  • MT1134MT1134 Posts: 34Member Member Posts: 34Member Member
    The poison is in the dose. Too little of something and there's no effective stimulus for change. Too much of something is likely to severely damage or kill. Both are equally harmful in the right context.

    I say that because it's important to know that a HIIT routine can be great or it can be harmful. You have to look at the bigger picture.

    There's many documented studies of HIIT being very effective for endurance runners. There's also counter studies showing the opposite.

    Both are true.

    Don't try to base your program on cortisol alone. There are many other factors that play a part in how you adapt.

    It's important that you're following a program that is containing itself following guiding principles with tactics to match.

    If your trainer is just giving you things to do to satisfy his ego or your curiosity an keep up with the latest trends then it's possible he/she doesn't quite understand what they are doing.

    However, it's also important that you put some trust into your trainer and allow them to take you through their process with all things considered.

    Program hopping isn't advised. Find something and stick it out for at least 6 to 12 weeks before changing programs.

    Random training gets you random results.
  • mojavemtbrmojavemtbr Posts: 11Member Member Posts: 11Member Member
    Any type of overtraining will raise Cortisol levels
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