Want to Run but Legs Are Sore

So, I’m 340 pounds, and I’m fat and out of shape, but I was a college wrestler, so I can move and work hard. Today, I regrettably cheated on my diet, and I haven’t been losing the weight that I want since I started changing my diet in the last couple of weeks. To make up for today, I was going to run for a couple hours. I’ve done it before, and I have a high tolerance for pain when I set my mind to it. The problem is, I did a hard workout two days ago, and my legs are really sore. I think what killed me the most was doing the 200 body weight squats. I have full range of motion, but my thighs especially are really tender. I was hoping I could stretch and be good to go. Any thoughts?
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Replies

  • lessdefined82
    lessdefined82 Posts: 70 Member
    in my older age, i try to run 3 times a week. now, i'm not a doctor, but what works for me is long stretches before AND after the run. i also do 5 minute walks before and after the run to warm up and cool down. and if my legs are already on fire, i just run at a slower pace. or sometimes i run treadmill as i find it easier on the joints.
  • LyndaBSS
    LyndaBSS Posts: 6,970 Member
    Listen to your body. ☺
  • Momjogger
    Momjogger Posts: 750 Member
    If you’re discouraged and are trying to make up for overeating by exercising, don’t hurt yourself, take a long walk instead, or a swim, or a bike ride.
  • JordanS9592
    JordanS9592 Posts: 94 Member
    Thanks for the tips. I might walk for an hour, we will see. The DOMS is pretty deep right now.
  • JordanS9592
    JordanS9592 Posts: 94 Member
    You didn’t mention this exercise in your other thread about being down because you hadn’t lost weight in 2 weeks. You know if your legs are that sore you are probably retaining a lot of water.
    Pounds lost from calorie deficit + pounds gained from water retention = 0?
    It’s a possibility.

    I’m not too educated on water retention, but I have a feeling you’re right because my body feels a lot stronger and I can see a slight difference in the way my shirts fit. I do need to get that number down though.
  • JordanS9592
    JordanS9592 Posts: 94 Member
    MikePTY wrote: »
    I know you probably mentally feel the same way you were when you were a college wrestler, but your body is not the same body. "High tolerance for pain" is not necessarily the best thing to do. Pushing your body beyond where it's ready is a good recipe for injury. Using exercise as "punishment" for overeating is also not a good thing to associate with it. I think you are better off taking a rest, and a deep breath, and setting diet and exercise goals that are reasonable. You are not going to lose the weight or get in shape overnight, but you can seriously set yourself back by doing too much too soon.

    I’ve been listening to the autobiography of David Goggins, so I just figured I’d do what he did to get in shape for the military. I can’t tell where to draw the line between mental toughness and overtraining, especially in these early stages. I feel like I can push a lot harder, but I don’t want to be injured being stupid either. I’m just going to take a long walk tonight and see how it goes.
  • JordanS9592
    JordanS9592 Posts: 94 Member
    Cherimoose wrote: »
    I’ve been listening to the autobiography of David Goggins, so I just figured I’d do what he did to get in shape for the military. I can’t tell where to draw the line between mental toughness and overtraining, especially in these early stages. I feel like I can push a lot harder, but I don’t want to be injured being stupid either.

    Goggins is inspiring, but he also injured himself numerous times, and came close to serious organ failure and death. Accept that fitness happens slowly, and that weight loss is mostly about your calorie intake, not exercise. If you happen to eat too much, just eat less the next day - never change your fitness plan. For running, a good plan to follow is C25K, and for strength, check the pinned post for a list of programs.. which are superior than doing a ton of bodyweight squats. :+1:

    Thank you for saying that. This makes a lot of sense. I was struggling with how to apply the principles of that book, and what you’re saying cleared it up for me.
  • JordanS9592
    JordanS9592 Posts: 94 Member
    dewd2 wrote: »
    Let's take a step back here a minute and address the real issue as I see it. You 'cheat' on your diet so you want to run for a couple hours. Stop this nonsense now before it becomes an issue. So you went over your calorie goal. So what? Don't punish yourself or try to 'make up' for it. Move on. Do better tomorrow.

    I don't care at all about daily totals. My goals are weekly. If I eat double what I should on one day I can adjust the rest to get close. Or not. These changes you are making are lifetime changes. Don't let one day ruin it.

    Exercise is for HEALTH. Not for weight loss.

    Good luck.

    This is really good advice. I can see how working out for the wrong reasons can lead to damaging habits. Thanks for the support.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,266 Member
    dpwellman wrote: »
    Firstly, I applaud your enthusiasm. I wish I had as much.

    Two hints::
      [*] Walking one miles burns roughly the same calories as running one mile (running has a "carry over" effect).
      [*] Body retains more fluid after intense training while it repairs and rejuvenates for one or two days.

      If one is insistent on managing DOMS, besides staying hydrated and getting All The Sleep, bromelain (supplement derived from pineapple) has an ant-inflammatory effect. Magnesium and calcium can also help.

      Actually, running burns more than twice as much calories as walking. The movement is completely different: you use more muscles and running involves a little jump where both feet are in the air at the same time.
    1. nooboots
      nooboots Posts: 480 Member
      yirara wrote: »
      dpwellman wrote: »
      Firstly, I applaud your enthusiasm. I wish I had as much.

      Two hints::
        [*] Walking one miles burns roughly the same calories as running one mile (running has a "carry over" effect).
        [*] Body retains more fluid after intense training while it repairs and rejuvenates for one or two days.

        If one is insistent on managing DOMS, besides staying hydrated and getting All The Sleep, bromelain (supplement derived from pineapple) has an ant-inflammatory effect. Magnesium and calcium can also help.

        Actually, running burns more than twice as much calories as walking. The movement is completely different: you use more muscles and running involves a little jump where both feet are in the air at the same time.

        But surely it takes less than half the time to do that mile? So you're exercising for half the time, therefore it should even out together? (Im just guessing I wouldnt have a clue never having run in my life)
      1. dewd2
        dewd2 Posts: 2,449 Member
        nooboots wrote: »
        yirara wrote: »
        dpwellman wrote: »
        Firstly, I applaud your enthusiasm. I wish I had as much.

        Two hints::
          [*] Walking one miles burns roughly the same calories as running one mile (running has a "carry over" effect).
          [*] Body retains more fluid after intense training while it repairs and rejuvenates for one or two days.

          If one is insistent on managing DOMS, besides staying hydrated and getting All The Sleep, bromelain (supplement derived from pineapple) has an ant-inflammatory effect. Magnesium and calcium can also help.

          Actually, running burns more than twice as much calories as walking. The movement is completely different: you use more muscles and running involves a little jump where both feet are in the air at the same time.

          But surely it takes less than half the time to do that mile? So you're exercising for half the time, therefore it should even out together? (Im just guessing I wouldnt have a clue never having run in my life)

          Time doesn't matter. It is mass x distance. A mile is a mile no matter how fast you run or walk it. I burn about 100 calories running a mile in 10 minutes or 7 minutes (it is not exact but close enough to not worry about the difference).
        1. Diatonic12
          Diatonic12 Posts: 32,344 Member
          Go to the swimming pool even if you don't know how to swim. You can start running in the pool without side effects from too much pressure on the joints and knees. They have water bikes and treadmills, too. Start there. Embracing more gentle stuff can be just as effective without lots of pain for the foreseeable future.

          Pain is the precursor to change but don't inflict more pain on yourself to make up for diet errors.
        2. emmamcgarity
          emmamcgarity Posts: 1,591 Member
          I’m going to suggest setting goals that support weight loss instead of trying to change your whole life at once. If I were in your position I would start with simple goals.

          Example goals:
          1 log my food every day, everything, even if over calories (no judgement for going over, work on habit building first.
          2. Walk for 15-30 minutes 5 times per week.

          These are just examples. Doing intensive exercise that causes so much soreness that you can’t move for several days makes it too easy for you to break the habit and want to quit. Once you establish habits you can build on them with adding new goals. To me this is making the journey the goal instead of a number on the scale. It feels more sustainable to me to break it down.
        3. JordanS9592
          JordanS9592 Posts: 94 Member
          I’m going to suggest setting goals that support weight loss instead of trying to change your whole life at once. If I were in your position I would start with simple goals.

          Example goals:
          1 log my food every day, everything, even if over calories (no judgement for going over, work on habit building first.
          2. Walk for 15-30 minutes 5 times per week.

          These are just examples. Doing intensive exercise that causes so much soreness that you can’t move for several days makes it too easy for you to break the habit and want to quit. Once you establish habits you can build on them with adding new goals. To me this is making the journey the goal instead of a number on the scale. It feels more sustainable to me to break it down.

          Thank you. I know my body can take more than that because I was a college athlete, but I will take your principle of not doing too much to prevent injury, and apply it to my situation.