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Has anyone experienced this?

capriqueencapriqueen Posts: 953Member Member Posts: 953Member Member
I started working out recently and I often find my lower back get extremely stiff in the mornings. I typically do 30 minutes of cardio and 30 minutes of weight training/pilates with resistance.

This morning, I noticed that along with my back, I started noticing pressure in my pelvic area too. This happens occasionally after exercise, but it's very momentary and I didn't pay much attention to it. I had also gotten it checked up in the past and was checked for any prolapse. Does anyone experience something similar? I got my back checked and was only given muscle relaxants- they only work for as long as you take them.

Replies

  • keithwp99keithwp99 Posts: 75Member Member Posts: 75Member Member
    You may be in need of a chiropractic adjustment.

    This is my experience. Overtime or with some level of overuse (recently too much dead lifts and kettle bell swings) I experienced lower back pain as well as a feeling of pressure / misalignment manifested in in the tail bone area. This is a condition that I periodically encounter. And, I know that I need an adjustment. I have a very experienced chiro that I have seen for several years and who I trust.

    You should of course make sure that you dont have some sort of hernia or slipped disc problem before hand too.

    Good luck. Let us know how this turns out for you. I am always interested in lower back issues and solutions.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 7,838Member Member Posts: 7,838Member Member
    If its getting extremely stiff, it might be a issue with your programming and/or load management. I would point in that direction first.

    My back does get extra stiff once in a blue moon when I'm training through something like a bulging disc like I'm currently doing. I just adjust my volume and intensity accordingly so the stimulus is properly dosed.
  • capriqueencapriqueen Posts: 953Member Member Posts: 953Member Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    If its getting extremely stiff, it might be a issue with your programming and/or load management. I would point in that direction first.

    My back does get extra stiff once in a blue moon when I'm training through something like a bulging disc like I'm currently doing. I just adjust my volume and intensity accordingly so the stimulus is properly dosed.

    Agreed. In the last few days I completely stopped with the weights and only stuck to pilates. What I did notice was that I used a 45 lb resistance band which may have aggravated the pain? I used to have pain before, but none as severe as after this.
  • 33gail3333gail33 Posts: 221Member Member Posts: 221Member Member
    I do experience this now and then as I am new to weightlifting. Last week I had some trouble getting out of bed after deadlifting the night before. I just figured I wasn't stretching enough. I had my physio check my lifting technique the following week and she also gave me some core strengthening exercises (but if you are doing pilates a weak core probably isn't your issue.)
    For me if it is just after workout stiffness I just work through it and monitor that it doesn't get worse ( I am 54 and have arthritis so a bit of daily pain isn't all that unusual for me unfortunately.) I have had herniated discs in the past so I know the difference between stiffness and an actual injury.
  • keithwp99keithwp99 Posts: 75Member Member Posts: 75Member Member
    Pain is bad. I am a trail runner but like to do alot of strength work too. When I was pushing on the kettle bell swings the pain was worse. So, stopped and took a couple days break to assess how bad. Once the soreness left, I still had the pain/pressure in the tail bone sector and knew I should see my chiro. Feeling better and back to the trail and ease into the lower body stuff!

    A competent chiro will ask about your problems / injuries before he tries any treatment.
  • capriqueencapriqueen Posts: 953Member Member Posts: 953Member Member
    keithwp99 wrote: »
    Pain is bad. I am a trail runner but like to do alot of strength work too. When I was pushing on the kettle bell swings the pain was worse. So, stopped and took a couple days break to assess how bad. Once the soreness left, I still had the pain/pressure in the tail bone sector and knew I should see my chiro. Feeling better and back to the trail and ease into the lower body stuff!

    A competent chiro will ask about your problems / injuries before he tries any treatment.

    My trainer pointed out I may have anterior pelvic tilt because of an exaggerated curve in my lower back. However, I have always had that shape in my body, even before I started a sedentary job, and was able to do squats/deadlifts just fine without hurting my back. Not sure if this contributing to my lower back pain.
  • CherimooseCherimoose Posts: 4,953Member Member Posts: 4,953Member Member
    capriqueen wrote: »
    My trainer pointed out I may have anterior pelvic tilt because of an exaggerated curve in my lower back. However, I have always had that shape in my body, even before I started a sedentary job

    Sedentary job + APT = tight hip flexor muscles, so avoid exercises that will tighten them more, like situps, leg raises, or any similar pilates moves where you're on your back and raising up. Also stretch your hip flexors and lower back several times a day, but don't stretch the lower deeply.
  • MostlyWaterMostlyWater Posts: 4,074Member Member Posts: 4,074Member Member
    Your chiro can suggest stretches to do.
  • TheAssyrianTheAssyrian Posts: 26Member, Premium Member Posts: 26Member, Premium Member
    So stretching is the first step. This includes 5-10 minutes on a foam roller. The foam roller is the most useful recovery and injury prevention tool I've used
  • capriqueencapriqueen Posts: 953Member Member Posts: 953Member Member
    So stretching is the first step. This includes 5-10 minutes on a foam roller. The foam roller is the most useful recovery and injury prevention tool I've used
    So stretching is the first step. This includes 5-10 minutes on a foam roller. The foam roller is the most useful recovery and injury prevention tool I've used

    Thanks, my trainer does get me to do this often.

    Is it still possible to strength train with APT?
  • dewd2dewd2 Posts: 2,116Member Member Posts: 2,116Member Member
    See a good trainer or physical therapist and strengthen the areas that are causing the issue (may not be the back). Avoid the quakopractors. There is NO scientific evidence they do anything worthwhile (beyond the placebo that you 'feel' better right after your visit only to feel the same later).
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