Rice, cooked and uncooked

Found on google that the difference between rice uncooked and cooked in uncooked times 3.

So 100gr uncooked rice good for 342 kcal makes 1026 kcal when it's cooked.

Anybody recognize these calculations
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Replies

  • LyndaBSS
    LyndaBSS Posts: 6,972 Member
    I weigh my rice according to the nutrition label, which indicates dry weight. I don't bother weighing it cooked.
  • DaintyWhisper
    DaintyWhisper Posts: 221 Member
    edited August 2019
    100g of uncooked rice will have the exact same amount of calories after it's cooked, assuming you only use water. The weight after it's cooked doesn't matter because it's only weight from the water that the rice has absorbed during the cooking process. As long as you weigh out 100g of rice knowing it's 342 calories, then you don't have to weigh it after you cook it. Add any additions separately (butter, broth, veggies, etc.)
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 31,931 Member
    My 45g of raw brown rice cooks up to 120-140g of cooked rice after absorbing the water during cooking. So it does equal approximately three times the weight.

    Same calories, obviously.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 22,924 Member
    edited August 2019
    No, rice doesn't increase in calories by cooking it. The only difference is water content.

    The usual process is to cook rice in water at 2 parts water to 1 part rice, so the ending volume is 3 times whatever the "parts" are.

    But if 100g uncooked rice has 342 calories, that same rice cooked (only water added) still has the 342 calories, no more.

    Why not just log an MFP database entry for the amount of rice you use? It's most accurate to weigh the uncooked rice, and log that using a database entry for dry rice; but if you forget to weigh it before cooking, just weigh it cooked and use an entry for cooked rice.
  • lx1x
    lx1x Posts: 37,243 Member
    edited August 2019
    FYI.. water doesn't add calories..

    If it calls for 100gr uncooked same rice when cooked.. it just absorbed the water..

    1/2cup Rice dry = 1 cup cooked rice.. same calories

    Edit
    Pretty much what Ann said . Lol

    Btw.. depending on rice.. some are 1:1 ratio for cooking..
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    I always weigh my rice dry. Most of the time I add it to a stew in the crockpot and let it absorb the extra liquid instead of using a thickener like flour or cornstarch. There is no way I could weigh it cooked when I do that.
  • ceiswyn
    ceiswyn Posts: 2,241 Member
    edited August 2019
    Found on google that the difference between rice uncooked and cooked in uncooked times 3.

    So 100gr uncooked rice good for 342 kcal makes 1026 kcal when it's cooked.

    Anybody recognize these calculations

    ...no.

    I don't know exactly what it was that you 'found on Google', but you seem to have misunderstood it quite dramatically. If you cook 100 g uncooked rice at 342 kcal, what you will end up with is about 300 g of cooked rice at... 342 kcal. Cooked rice is heavier than uncooked, due to the added water. That's all.

  • sefajane1
    sefajane1 Posts: 322 Member
    I cooked 1 cup (233g) of dry rice yesterday in 2 cups of water. The cooked rice weighed only 577g, so it's not necessarily 3 x the dry weight.
  • sefajane1
    sefajane1 Posts: 322 Member
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  • KeelyM423
    KeelyM423 Posts: 20 Member
    Found on google that the difference between rice uncooked and cooked in uncooked times 3.

    So 100gr uncooked rice good for 342 kcal makes 1026 kcal when it's cooked.

    Anybody recognize these calculations

    I don't understand this?
  • KeelyM423
    KeelyM423 Posts: 20 Member
    So to be clear, cooked or uncooked the calories are the same?
  • KeelyM423
    KeelyM423 Posts: 20 Member
    lx1x wrote: »
    FYI.. water doesn't add calories..

    If it calls for 100gr uncooked same rice when cooked.. it just absorbed the water..

    1/2cup Rice dry = 1 cup cooked rice.. same calories

    Edit
    Pretty much what Ann said . Lol

    Btw.. depending on rice.. some are 1:1 ratio for cooking..

    Explained
  • sefajane1
    sefajane1 Posts: 322 Member
    edited August 2019
    If you cook 100g of dry rice and consume the whole thing then the calories are the same but, if you cook 100g (dry weight) and eat only a portion of the rice you'd need to weigh the cooked rice, divide that amount by the amount of calories in the dry weight, multiply by how many grams you are eating.
    It's much simpler to use the recipe builder function and weigh the dry rice, record the amount of calories. Then weigh the cooked rice, enter that weight in grams as the number of servings. Weigh your portion and enter that amount in grams as the serving size.
    So 1g = 1 serving, as I've done (see my screenshot above). If I eat 234g of cooked rice I log it as 234 servings.

    My original point was that this "cooked rice is 3 x heavier than dry rice" is nonsense.
  • KeelyM423
    KeelyM423 Posts: 20 Member
    Time stay clear of rice , lol
  • KeelyM423
    KeelyM423 Posts: 20 Member
    Can say , the advice here is great. Please feel free to add me up on the friend list. Food knowledge is key to hopefully fueling body correctly .
  • shaf238
    shaf238 Posts: 4,021 Member
    Follow the packet instructions, best bet is to weigh uncooked.
  • sefajane1
    sefajane1 Posts: 322 Member
    KeelyM423 wrote: »
    Time stay clear of rice , lol

    Why? It's just rice, it doesn't have to be complicated 😁
  • KeelyM423
    KeelyM423 Posts: 20 Member
    I'm only joking on that lol.

    Plus I love rice lol
  • sefajane1
    sefajane1 Posts: 322 Member
    edited August 2019
    KeelyM423 wrote: »
    I'm only joking on that lol.

    Plus I love rice lol

    I did hope so 😂 Seriously, if you're cooking the rice just for 1 portion then weigh and record it dry plus anything else you add to it (I used a stock cube and some spice yesterday).
    If you're making more than one portion then build a recipe and let MFP figure out the calories.
  • KeelyM423
    KeelyM423 Posts: 20 Member
    Great tip , thank you.