Calorie Counter

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Peloton owners

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  • sijomialsijomial Posts: 15,263Member Member Posts: 15,263Member Member
    HilTri wrote: »
    Oh yes, sorry I wasn’t clear, I just want the computer on the bike that shows stats. I don’t need a big old screen to provide workouts and pretty scenery, I have tons of workouts and part of the reason I want a bike at home is to create more workouts for my classes.

    What stats in particular?

    You can add devices to yourself or dumb trainers to provide certain stats.

    e.g.
    I have a chest strap HRM, a shoe mounted cadence sensor, power meter pedals, a wrist watch ;) .....
    (Only the power meter is expensive and probably not relelvant for designing classes for mixed abilities.)

    A gym quality secondhand/used spinning bike would seem to fit the bill for you, they often come up on eBay and other similar sites at reasonable prices.

  • HilTriHilTri Posts: 239Member, Premium Member Posts: 239Member, Premium Member
    I wear a HRM too. I am just interested in Watts, RPM’s, resistance and calories and time of course. Thank you.
  • sijomialsijomial Posts: 15,263Member Member Posts: 15,263Member Member
    HilTri wrote: »
    I wear a HRM too. I am just interested in Watts, RPM’s, resistance and calories and time of course. Thank you.

    Watts - Power produced is very personal and a very wide range. On a personal level training with power is very revealing and effective. But you would have to be training a very similar and probably a serious group of similar cyclists to use that in a class environment I would think. And then you would have to solely focus on watts and not HR at the same time (e.g. I was training with two other male cyclists all doing the same warmup and then maintaining 200w. The HRs ranged from 120 to 150 to 180bpm at identical power and calorie burns). I also ride with an elite female rider who produces a fraction of my power but a far superior power to weight ratio as she's tiny.

    RPM - I use a Wahoo shoe mounted cadence counter and it's been very reliable and accurate. And of course I can use on multiple bikes.

    Resistance - not seeing any advantage of a smart trainer compared to a dumb trainer for resistance settings. Which as you know aren't universal across different brands/models of indoor bikes. I would be leaning towards having the same bike at home as you have in the gym.

    Calories - be very cautious about calorie displays as there's a lot of vanity calories around. Unless they are using power meters take with a large pinch of salt. Even measuring watts isn't a guarantee as I've come across a bike with highly accurate power meters and a downright potty calorie alorithm that even the manufacturer's tech support couldn't justify. You can validate the algorithm yourself with some simple maths though - I link my Garmin to the exercise bike's power meters to get an accurate picture.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 9,108Member Member Posts: 9,108Member Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    I also ride with an elite female rider who produces a fraction of my power but a far superior power to weight ratio as she's tiny.

    I want to second this. Raw watts favor the big and the genetically gifted sprinters. w:kg is more fair, and a better indicator of fitness.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,810Member Member Posts: 2,810Member Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    HilTri wrote: »
    I wear a HRM too. I am just interested in Watts, RPM’s, resistance and calories and time of course. Thank you.

    Watts - Power produced is very personal and a very wide range. On a personal level training with power is very revealing and effective. But you would have to be training a very similar and probably a serious group of similar cyclists to use that in a class environment I would think. And then you would have to solely focus on watts and not HR at the same time (e.g. I was training with two other male cyclists all doing the same warmup and then maintaining 200w. The HRs ranged from 120 to 150 to 180bpm at identical power and calorie burns). I also ride with an elite female rider who produces a fraction of my power but a far superior power to weight ratio as she's tiny.

    Where power can be used effectively in group settings/class formats is when intervals are based off of a percentage of FTP. This is how TrainerRoad, Sufferfest, and their competitors are able to create generic but effective training plans. I have seen this used in a class format. There's a cycling studio that I used to go to where they would, and presumably still do, create all of the workouts around an FTP percentage. As part of your orientation, you'd do a 20 min FTP test and you would get a laminated card with your power zones based on that. You would attach to the bike you were on for reference (at that time they were using the cyclops bikes).

    I just looked them up and it looks like now they use Wahoo Kickrs (you provide your own bike) and PerfPro. That, presumably, allows them enter in each rider's FTP into PerfPro and then the software controls the individual trainers.
  • sijomialsijomial Posts: 15,263Member Member Posts: 15,263Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    HilTri wrote: »
    I wear a HRM too. I am just interested in Watts, RPM’s, resistance and calories and time of course. Thank you.

    Watts - Power produced is very personal and a very wide range. On a personal level training with power is very revealing and effective. But you would have to be training a very similar and probably a serious group of similar cyclists to use that in a class environment I would think. And then you would have to solely focus on watts and not HR at the same time (e.g. I was training with two other male cyclists all doing the same warmup and then maintaining 200w. The HRs ranged from 120 to 150 to 180bpm at identical power and calorie burns). I also ride with an elite female rider who produces a fraction of my power but a far superior power to weight ratio as she's tiny.

    Where power can be used effectively in group settings/class formats is when intervals are based off of a percentage of FTP. This is how TrainerRoad, Sufferfest, and their competitors are able to create generic but effective training plans. I have seen this used in a class format. There's a cycling studio that I used to go to where they would, and presumably still do, create all of the workouts around an FTP percentage. As part of your orientation, you'd do a 20 min FTP test and you would get a laminated card with your power zones based on that. You would attach to the bike you were on for reference (at that time they were using the cyclops bikes).

    I just looked them up and it looks like now they use Wahoo Kickrs (you provide your own bike) and PerfPro. That, presumably, allows them enter in each rider's FTP into PerfPro and then the software controls the individual trainers.

    Completely agree.
    But OP is creating workouts for a Spinning class - who typically won't know their FTP and probably won't want to invest the time in testing/retesting it.
    And maybe won't be measuring their power either although power meters are percolating downwards all the time as they get more affordable and spreading out from the niche of serious cyclists.

    If OP is running a training program for serious cyclists in a cycling studio then definitely a power meter (ready built in or bolted on) should be on the shopping list.
  • HilTriHilTri Posts: 239Member, Premium Member Posts: 239Member, Premium Member
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,810Member Member Posts: 2,810Member Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    HilTri wrote: »
    I wear a HRM too. I am just interested in Watts, RPM’s, resistance and calories and time of course. Thank you.

    Watts - Power produced is very personal and a very wide range. On a personal level training with power is very revealing and effective. But you would have to be training a very similar and probably a serious group of similar cyclists to use that in a class environment I would think. And then you would have to solely focus on watts and not HR at the same time (e.g. I was training with two other male cyclists all doing the same warmup and then maintaining 200w. The HRs ranged from 120 to 150 to 180bpm at identical power and calorie burns). I also ride with an elite female rider who produces a fraction of my power but a far superior power to weight ratio as she's tiny.

    Where power can be used effectively in group settings/class formats is when intervals are based off of a percentage of FTP. This is how TrainerRoad, Sufferfest, and their competitors are able to create generic but effective training plans. I have seen this used in a class format. There's a cycling studio that I used to go to where they would, and presumably still do, create all of the workouts around an FTP percentage. As part of your orientation, you'd do a 20 min FTP test and you would get a laminated card with your power zones based on that. You would attach to the bike you were on for reference (at that time they were using the cyclops bikes).

    I just looked them up and it looks like now they use Wahoo Kickrs (you provide your own bike) and PerfPro. That, presumably, allows them enter in each rider's FTP into PerfPro and then the software controls the individual trainers.

    Completely agree.
    But OP is creating workouts for a Spinning class - who typically won't know their FTP and probably won't want to invest the time in testing/retesting it.
    And maybe won't be measuring their power either although power meters are percolating downwards all the time as they get more affordable and spreading out from the niche of serious cyclists.

    If OP is running a training program for serious cyclists in a cycling studio then definitely a power meter (ready built in or bolted on) should be on the shopping list.

    Yeah I was assuming you were talking about a broader number of situations than what you were talking about. I agree that if she's teaching spin classes for your average group of gym goers, the likelihood of any of them knowing their FTP (or what functional threshold power even is) is low.
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