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Healthy BMI

mo1700mo1700 Posts: 76Member Member Posts: 76Member Member
I’ve reached MY personal goal and now want to try to stay there or thereabouts, just checked & my BMI is sitting at 26.5 so I’m still about 9lbs over, now I know this is what is classed as healthy for my height but I feel good at the moment & just don’t want to put weight back on, I’ve had lots of celebrations since reaching my goal & have probably logged on less days than I haven’t but I know I need to keep an eye on myself & am going to log daily again. Although I’m happy in myself I still feel as if I’ve not quite achieved what I should do feel a bit confused now??? Help!

Replies

  • MikePTYMikePTY Posts: 3,082Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,082Member, Premium Member
    There is no one right answer for you on this as it depends on your body composition. Measures like body fat percentage, waist to hip ratio, etc will give you a better personal idea for yourself. Some people are more muscular/lean at higher weights than others. So it is possible to have a BMI of 26.5 and still be a healthy weight. But the truth is for most people, at a BMI of 26.5 they will be what the BMI suggests: "slightly overweight".

    I am at a BMI of 27.2 right now, which is pretty close to yours. It is 16 pounds above normal. I know that if I am being honest with myself, even though I am very happy with the progress I have made, and some days feel complacent about how far I've come (40 pounds down so far), that I am at least the 16 pounds overweight that BMI suggests. Realistically, my "ideal" weight is probably somewhere between 25-30 pounds below where I am now, which would but me in the BMI 23-24 range.

    Even if you are 9 pounds overweight from a health aspect, I don't think that is the be all and end all of health. These things are meant as a scale not as a sharp cut off of "good/bad". A person is not measurably healthier at a 24.9 BMI than a 25. So ultimately, if you are at a weight where you feel good about yourself and comfortable in your own skin, that is the most important part. You can always enter maintenance for a few months and see afterwards if you decide that you want to go any lower.
  • SarahAnne3958SarahAnne3958 Posts: 78Member Member Posts: 78Member Member
    apullum wrote: »
    How does your doctor feel about your current weight? Do they believe that it’s healthy for you?

    Remember also that maintenance doesn’t need to be a one time decision. You can maintain at this weight for a while and then decide whether or not you want to lose more.

    This exactly. I've been in maintenance for years now and during this time my goals have changed frequently and will continue to do so. OP, at your next check-in with your doctor it would be good to have a conversation with them about where you're at, but it sounds like you're approaching this with common sense and are setting yourself up to be successful long term :)
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,118Member Member Posts: 5,118Member Member
    Whilst it is obviously true that being overweight carries health risks this is an incremental thing.

    Somebody with BMI of 40 ( unless extreme body builder outlier) will have some significant risk increase.

    BMI of 26.5, ie only slightly overweight for most people, is really unlikely to have risk increase.

    I guess unless you are somebody for whom a lower BMI range than the usual would apply and therefore 26.5 was more than very slightly overweight ( ie petite asian ladies)
  • sgriskasgriska Posts: 108Member Member Posts: 108Member Member
    BMI is pretty useless for me I've found. I'm 5'4", 53 years old, and had a Dexascan when I reached 140 lbs (which was just barely in the upper edge of the normal BMI range), and my body fat was 22%, which is a lot lower than I would have expected it would be. Mind you, I was thrilled, but I really expected based on BMI it would be 30%-ish. Guess I've been blessed with a decent amount of muscle on my frame, cuz goodness knows I've not worked for it! LOL!
  • nowine4menowine4me Posts: 3,956Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,956Member, Premium Member
    BMI has been covered. As for maintaining, do whatever you have been doing with a handful more calories until you’re weight is stable. Good podcast on subject: Half Size Me
  • GamlielaGamliela Posts: 2,484Member Member Posts: 2,484Member Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    I was very happy when I hit my personal goal which was 7lbs over the BMI healthy range as I'd carried my excess weight for 20 years. Back to my all time favourite adult weight.

    But after maintaining a while I did realise that although I was a genuinely a BMI outlier when I was much younger and carried more muscle that really didn't still apply in my 50's.

    Simply asked myself if I should optimally be lighter, the same, or heavier and adjusted in a series of small steps. I did have to reluctantly accept that no I'm not a BMI outlier anymore. Sadly there's a lot of chubby people using the fact that some people (mostly male, mostly young, mostly doing an unusual amount of exercise....) are outliers as an excuse to stay chubby.

    Six years later on I've adjusted my weight range many times (down and up) as my body changed or my fitness goals changed or simply to make maintenance easier and more enjoyable.

    Why not just get used to maintaining for a few months, get used to the new you, be happy you have achieved something many people fail to do and then reassess?

    Perhaps it might turn out to be....
    Better --> Best. Happy --> Happier.
    But perhaps you might decide this is the right weight range for you at this point in your life.

    I was an outlier when I was younger. I had high muscle mass and low body fat.
    Now, much older, I don't worry if I am at the top of my bmi range, even though I surely wouldn't be called an outlier anymore.

    The overweight bmi has been shown to be ok for people over 65, I think it is 65, because they survive health crisis better than people at a lower bmi. Still it is, of course, up to the individual. I do think bmi has validity as a health marker.
    I agree wholeheartely with the advice of 'getting used to maintaining for a few months'.

    I feel happier with the amount of food I can eat and the energy I have for excersize and work when I am in the higher bmi range of 'healthy'. People who carry more muscle mass will obviously need more food to supply their body with enough energy.

  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,118Member Member Posts: 5,118Member Member
    Gamliela wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    I was very happy when I hit my personal goal which was 7lbs over the BMI healthy range as I'd carried my excess weight for 20 years. Back to my all time favourite adult weight.

    But after maintaining a while I did realise that although I was a genuinely a BMI outlier when I was much younger and carried more muscle that really didn't still apply in my 50's.

    Simply asked myself if I should optimally be lighter, the same, or heavier and adjusted in a series of small steps. I did have to reluctantly accept that no I'm not a BMI outlier anymore. Sadly there's a lot of chubby people using the fact that some people (mostly male, mostly young, mostly doing an unusual amount of exercise....) are outliers as an excuse to stay chubby.

    Six years later on I've adjusted my weight range many times (down and up) as my body changed or my fitness goals changed or simply to make maintenance easier and more enjoyable.

    Why not just get used to maintaining for a few months, get used to the new you, be happy you have achieved something many people fail to do and then reassess?

    Perhaps it might turn out to be....
    Better --> Best. Happy --> Happier.
    But perhaps you might decide this is the right weight range for you at this point in your life.

    I was an outlier when I was younger. I had high muscle mass and low body fat.
    Now, much older, I don't worry if I am at the top of my bmi range, even though I surely wouldn't be called an outlier anymore.

    The overweight bmi has been shown to be ok for people over 65, I think it is 65, because they survive health crisis better than people at a lower bmi. Still it is, of course, up to the individual. I do think bmi has validity as a health marker.
    I agree wholeheartely with the advice of 'getting used to maintaining for a few months'.

    I feel happier with the amount of food I can eat and the energy I have for excersize and work when I am in the higher bmi range of 'healthy'. People who carry more muscle mass will obviously need more food to supply their body with enough energy.

    The australian guidlines now suggest that people over 7o may be better off at a slightly higher BMI than the standard upper range.

    However again, slightly over means 26 or 27ish - not 40 or so.

    slightly overweight, not obese.

    edited September 23
  • GamlielaGamliela Posts: 2,484Member Member Posts: 2,484Member Member
    @paperpudding
    The guidlines make sense.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,118Member Member Posts: 5,118Member Member
    yes, I'm not disagreeing with them.
  • GamlielaGamliela Posts: 2,484Member Member Posts: 2,484Member Member
    I knew that, was just confirming my own agreement ;)
  • JthanmyfitnesspalJthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 1,927Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,927Member, Premium Member
    I am going to tell my joke again: BMI is just your weight in kg divided by your height in meters squared. It may be somewhat useful, but don't give it too much weight!

    It has been used in a large number of statistical studies, so there is some backing to the advice. However, most studies show little increased risk of this or that near the top of the range and there are many other factors to health, including exercise, smoking, alcohol, diet (composition), and (horribly) genetics.
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