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30 Day Logging/Limiting Added Sugar Challenge

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  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,446Member Member Posts: 4,446Member Member
    Please continue debate topics in debate. This will be my last response to those here.
    yrguide wrote: »
    And your information is not consistent with the information I provided. I made the claim the the bulk of added sugars come from processed foods and that still stands.

    No one said it wasn't from processed foods, are you intentionally trying to misrepresent the discussion? All of the foods I listed (and my source provided) are, of course, processed foods. That says zero about whether they are obviously sugar-containing or not.
    The willful ignorance here is absurd. If you were in a CICO weight loss thread and you told people over and over again not to worry about tracking that 120 calorie candy bar, it's negligent in the scope of your weight loss goals because it's only 10% of your allowed calories of the day. And then you said eh, anything around 100 calories you shouldn't bother to track the entire forum would be all over you.

    No one said not to log it. (And you know this, as I've pointed it out over and over, so why pretend otherwise.)

    It's instead like logging whole eggs and saying "yes, it's more cals than egg whites, but given that my cals and fat are on point, it's not something to worry about, and I don't think there's some reason to always try to reduce cals, no matter what." Or maybe it's like the fact that I never log and never have logged black coffee or tea (or herbal tea). Sure, there are some calories, but eh.

    Or, even better example, the sat fat one I gave already that you, of course, ignored.

    kshama and I aren't telling anyone else how to decide what sugars they are concerned about or what they should focus on cutting down on or out. The whole point of this challenge is that it's up to you to determine what you think is an issue in your own diet that this could help with. Perhaps you are coming from a place where you eat lots of ultraprocessed foods so wanted to find lower or no sugar versions, great, post about what you are doing if this is still something you need to monitor and track, you are welcome! Some certainly have used the thread as an educational forum for finding out where their sugar comes from, and I support that and think it's great.

    Many others are coming more from a place where they struggle with temptation around dessert type foods, or difficulty controlling them, and cutting them out for a while (or longer) can be a legitimate strategy for dealing with that for some (including me at times).
    edited January 14
  • yrguideyrguide Posts: 22Member Member Posts: 22Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    yrguide wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    yrguide wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    My brand of Sriracha, Sky Valley, has 1 g of added sugar per teaspoon.

    This is a good point. A lot of these fear-mongering tactics about condiments assume that you use the same condiments every day and that you use silly amounts of them. We've been talking about 1 TBSP of sriracha for 3 g, but normally when I use that I mix it with soy sauce and lime as part of a marinade or sauce for more than one serving of food.

    I also rarely consume BBQ sauce (I have a few different ones in my refrigerator), and frankly when I have the foods I use them on (pulled pork, other BBQ style foods) it's normally a big cal blowout, so having a few grams of sugar (when I normally don't have other added sugar anyway) seems like it would be a weird thing to worry about.

    No one is worrying about having a few grams of sugar here and there. As been said numerous times, based on YOUR diet you don't need to quit sugar at all so I'm not quite sure why you are bothering other than trying to sabotage others. And it's pretty obvious you are willfully trying to sabotage others when you suggest to others not to worry about 10 or 20% of your added sugar allotment for the day. The point is to add it all up, not to just disregard what *you* are worried about when based on your diet you shouldn't be here. The woman who budgeted 85 grams for the day is who the sugar challenge is for. Not for you.

    As I read the post, the 85 g was from MFP (15% of cals). The poster said she got her sugar from dessert type items. You are therefore making up some backstory that does not exist.

    I went back and looked at the referenced post and prior posts by that poster, and am rather offended on her behalf at how misleadingly you have used the post, @yrguide.

    She previously had said she was joining the thread for fun and to learn. She posted several times with added sugar usually around the 5% level (a few slightly higher days due to specific items that she identified and said she was fine with for a single day). The day you have fixated on was clearly an a-typical day, and has zero to do with "hidden sugars" as she said: "It came mostly from 2 pieces of chocolate cake with ice cream. A little from milk in my coffee and bread." The 85 g referenced was MFP's goal for total sugar (15% of cals).

    Why would you possibly be offended on her behalf? It wasn't offensive at all.

    You suggested that she was habitually eating huge amounts of added sugar and wasn't aware of where it was coming from. That's offensive because it's a misrepresentation of the truth.
    It was two days in a row, not one. The day before the 85 gram day was 83 grams.

    Nope, there were no 85 g days. I went quickly through the relevant posts, and here are the reported days:

    15, about 12, 29, 52 (caramel apple as a Halloween tradition and dressing she knew was sweet), 17 (even including small piece of cake), 28 (yogurt, she said she knew but considered it a better choice than a candy bar, and was fine with it), 18, 20, 18, 83 (the 2 big pieces of cake with ice cream), 35 total, 18 (added again).

    At this point, this whole thing is super stupid, as I don't even know what you imagine we are debating. (I also think your interpretation of my post in the other thread is bizarre, but we aren't supposed to bring things in from another thread so I'm going to ignore that. Comment on my post in the relevant thread if you like.)

    In an effort to find a way to end this and to get back to the purpose of the thread:

    One thing I think we actually agree on: for the purposes of this thread and challenge it makes sense to track and log (or just know for your own purposes) all added sugar, since it is helpful to understand where your sugar is coming from, especially if you are new to tracking.

    One thing I think we might disagree on: Whether you care about cutting out or down on sugar from particular sources is dependent on why you think it's worth paying attention to and cutting out or down on sugar in the first place. If the issue is trouble controlling sweets and you don't get all that much from savory-type sources, you might not care about cutting out or otherwise worrying about savory sources (and might be more interested in talking about temptations re sweets rather than grams of sugar, added or otherwise). This thread is meant to be open to everyone interested in cutting down on added sugar, including those who want to try the absolutely none experience and those who merely want support in learning to control the intake of sweets, and those who are curious about what they are consuming and easy ways to cut back. My comments were not about what others should do (see next paragraph).

    Another thing I think we disagree about (since it's apparently what caused you to go ballistic on me): if one has already tracked one's diet or regularly does and already knows that she gets little added sugar on a daily basis from tiny amounts of sugar in a few products such as protein powder, sauces, or rubs, or even a favorite salad dressing, etc., there is no particular health benefit and may be no other benefits to cutting out such foods. I think it's cool if one wants to (I did it once, after all), but I think it's wrong to claim that such a challenge requires cutting out all added sugar to be valuable or that it's unhealthy to eat any (which again was the point of the post you took issue with).

    Again, I have found it valuable for me, from time to time, to cut out added sugar, as it can help me get more quickly out of bad habits I sometimes establish around the holidays or in times of stress (the past month was both). The first time, mainly because I was told it was oh so hard, I cut out ALL added sugar and found it not hard at all. Every time after that, I've focused only on dessert/snack type items, since that's what specifically related to my own reasons for doing this. Thus, I think it's quite reasonable to not worry about products that have a tiny bit of sugar unless you have other reasons (such as getting a high amount of added sugar in your day as a whole) to worry about it, as I said. Publicly-sponsored challenges (not personal ones) resting on the claim that even a couple of grams of sugar total are something to worry about, if the sugar is added, fail to understand why there are recommended limits on added sugar and nutrition in general.

    I have, over and over again, asserted the WHO guidelines for added sugars which is 25 grams.

    I have over and over again asserted that simply blowing off adding up bits of sugar that you think is negligible is actually 10% to 20% of your added sugar allocation for the day.

    Again, I am asserting that because you obviously eat within the guidelines your advice to ignore what YOU deem to be a negligible about of added sugar is not helpful to others who don't eat like you and that it's irresponsible advice.

    Cutting back sugar for many is not just about cutting out sweets.
  • yrguideyrguide Posts: 22Member Member Posts: 22Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Please continue debate topics in debate. This will be my last response to those here.

    No one said not to log it. (And you know this, as I've pointed it out over and over, so why pretend otherwise.)

    I'm not sure how you square up suggesting disregarding those grams of added sugars while simultaneously logging them, it's not possible.
    Perhaps you are coming from a place where you eat lots of ultraprocessed foods so wanted to find lower or no sugar versions,

    I'm not and I don't but most people doing a sugar challenge don't already eat in a manner where they don't actually need to cut out sugar like you so again, your suggestion not to worry about those extra grams is the same as telling someone watching their weight not to worry about those extra calories. Again as I have said over and over again, it all adds up and it's helpful for people who eat like 85 grams a day to know where ALL of it comes from, not just tracking their sweets intake.

    And I have zero idea what saturated fat example you are talking about.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,446Member Member Posts: 4,446Member Member
    So yesterday was pretty good -- no added sugar (smoothie for breakfast, my leftover cassoulet (that I made a ton of and froze at Christmas) for lunch, with an apple, and then I created a basic, lazy take-off on a Thai curry for dinner, and decided to try having it on millet, along with a small salad. I'm not sure the millet worked, but I'll have it again for lunch and see what I think then.

    In addition to the no added sugar, I had 51 g of intrinsic sugar (apple, small banana, and veg, mostly), and 39 g of fiber, which is a bit on the lower side for me, but okay.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,446Member Member Posts: 4,446Member Member
    So let's try to have a friendly chat and see if we can clear things up and move on (and please feel free to use the thread as it's intended).
    yrguide wrote: »
    I have, over and over again, asserted the WHO guidelines for added sugars which is 25 grams.

    The WHO guidelines are 10% of total cals, with 5% suggested as even better.

    My sat fat example (perhaps you were so anxious to respond that you skimmed my post above and missed it!) was the following: I aim for less than 8% of my cals as sat fat, I think that's supported by various recommendations. For me, at 1800 cals, that's about 16 g. The other day I had 2.7 g from peanut butter (no sugar added, only peanuts and salt!) in my smoothie, so that's about 17% of my total sat fat, oh nos! What will I do? Oh, right, most of what I eat doesn't have sat fat. Yesterday was an even better example, as my cassoulet had over half of my planned sat fat, but again so what, the overall day is what matters.

    Thus, I don't think "oh, it's over 10% of budget so that's inherently bad" is an especially helpful approach.
    yrguide wrote: »
    I'm not sure how you square up suggesting disregarding those grams of added sugars while simultaneously logging them, it's not possible.

    Okay, I'll take this as an honest misunderstanding and explain.

    I am taking it as a given that everyone here who cares (i.e., who is not simply here for support in not overdoing sugary treat type foods, which is a totally valid reason to be here) is logging, and is learning where their added sugar comes from. I've always told people concerned about high sugar numbers that I think it's important to look at sources, that I personally don't care about intrinsic sugar so long as I'm getting plenty of protein, healthy fats, and fiber, and that it's worth seeing if the sugar is coming from expected foods or is, instead, a surprise. If a surprise, you might want to consider making some easy changes as that might make controlling cals easier (unnecessary added cals) or increase satiety, depending on the source.

    What kshama and I were talking about were "0 added sugar challenges." We were saying that for us we don't really see the benefits of such challenges and instead wanted to focus on sources of sugar that actually were the reasons for participating in the challenge for us (for me more in the past, but I ate kind of badly over the holidays so this is valuable for me too). That was with the understanding that we knew how much sugar we get typically in the types of products we were talking about and given that, we did not think there was any harm to using an occasional rub or sauce with some sugar, or in my case adding a little honey to an occasional savory recipe, or in kshama's case continuing to use her preferred protein powder with a gram or so of sugar vs. the all artificial sugar one she thought tasted bad. It's also worth noting that a little sugar added to a meal that already has fiber, protein, etc. is more akin to sugar in fruit and veg than a soda (which is a LOT of sugar often consumed on its own) or a sugary treat (which can be similar).

    The point was not that no one should log savory items (obviously), but that there's no inherent superiority or advantage to doing a NO sugar challenge and eliminating items that overall count for a tiny amount of sugar if you already know they are no problem for you (no connection with overeating, for example) and they aren't accounting for a significant part of the diet.

    Thus, I personally am not going out of my way to avoid these items, and don't consider it, for me under my personal rules, to violate the rules of my challenge to have them or to be a less worthwhile challenge for me than cutting out those items would be. I will of course post when I do consume them and the amount, however, because I am logging them. When I did my original 0 sugar challenge, by contrast, I did go out of my way to avoid them, and that's what I thought was unnecessary subsequently (again, for me).

    I don't tell people what rules they should have for their own personal challenges. Over time, some seem to be limiting overall sugar (even intrinsic), others are cutting out added and fake sugars, and others are using it to learn about the sources of sugar, and some (including the person whose thread prompted this) are really focused on how sugary treats are for them trigger foods, and so focused on those.

    So is that clear?
    edited January 14
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,164Member Member Posts: 21,164Member Member
    yrguide wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    yrguide wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    yrguide wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Monday I had no added sugar, and so far none today.

    Although I am tracking everything at the moment just for the experiment, this is the conclusion I came to too. For me, non dessert added sugar tends to be pretty small amounts in savory foods or, most commonly, some sauces or rubs, and I really see no reason to care about that. Plus, it would be hard for that to add up to all that many cals. I really think these no sugar challenges that start by assuming you are eating some huge amount of sugar and then tell you to avoid these incidental sources are rather silly. I think it makes more sense to have people track their sugar, understand where it is coming from, and then consider reasonable changes if it is, in fact, higher than expected, which for most will be reducing snack/dessert foods or sugar-added drinks, with some maybe having more than expected in sugary cereals or trail mixes or granola bars or flavored yogurt. But if someone really loves adding, say, a bit of sugar to coffee or oats, I don't think that's something to be bothered about if the overall nutrition of the day and percentage of added sugar is fine anyway.

    I used to use an example of a rhubarb sauce with a little sugar added vs. a homemade apple sauce. Why is the latter inherently preferable to the former? No good reason IMO. (Even Dr. Greger, who has other issues, no doubt, says that objecting to a little sugar or oil if that is how the overall diet becomes more sustainable and is able to incorporate nutritious foods like oats and veg, is not something to worry about.)

    One of the points of these challenges is educating yourself about how much sugar, especially hidden added sugar, are in your foods. Including savory and sauces.

    You don't care about sugar in sauces? You should. For example, one tablespoon of ketchup contains a full teaspoon of sugar (4 grams). A full 1/3rd of the ketchup you eat is sugar. BBQ sauce like Sweet Baby Rays? Two tablespoons of that sauce contains 4 teaspoons (16 grams) of sugar. So 2/3rds of your BBQ sauce is sugar. What about something savory like a Lean Cuisine? The Chicken Ranch Club contains just over 2 teaspoons of sugar (9 grams). Salad dressings average around a 1 1/2 tsp (6 grams) per tablespoon serving. It all starts adding up in a big way, especially when you should be averaging about 25 grams total per day.

    The more important issue is why calories derived from sugar are worse for you than calories from fats or protein. Sugars almost convert straight to fat and worse yet, calories from sugar keep you hungry. There is a hormone called leptin that increases as you take in calories. As leptin increases it tells your brain that hey, we're full. We've got enough food/energy right now and we should work on storing and using it. If your brain is not getting a signal from leptin it thinks it's hungry. When you take in sugar it raises your insulin levels and insulin blocks the signal from leptin getting to the brain. Sugar, from natural sources, is usually paired with natural fiber which is why fruits are ok, it's considered a slow carb. The fiber in the fruit slows down how quickly the sugar is metabolized into fat.

    Calories in/calories out is only half true, where you get your calories is equally as large an issue.

    You can read more about it here:

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/04/20/so-this-is-exactly-how-sugar-makes-us-fat_a_22046969/

    I also highly recommend everyone watch "That Sugar Film" if you can.

    Oh and PS. Here is an article published in a medical journal outlining the leptin/obesity connection:

    https://www.nature.com/articles/0802753

    As noted upthread, the bigger food manufacturers were required to include "added sugar" to their labels beginning Jan 2020, and many of them had already started when I did this challenge last fall. Once exception was Newman's Ranch salad dressing, which has 1 g total sugar per 30 g of dressing. Since I usually eat 15 g salad dressing per salad (I supply the rest of the "mouth feel" with cottage cheese, which has 6 g of intrinsic sugar per 113 g (more than I add to a salad), of which 0 comes from added sugar), while I logged the half gram of sugar, it was not something I was concerned about.

    My brand of Sriracha, Sky Valley, has 1 g of added sugar per teaspoon.

    I might have BBQ sauce once per year. (Might.)

    Then why are you here if you don't need to cut sugar out of your diet?

    It's similar to the both of you being on a diet when you don't actually need to lose weight then telling others not to worry about logging that slice of cake. Honestly, it's so willfully ignorant it's mind boggling.

    You're clearly intelligent, so I think the only explanation for you equating not worrying about sugar in Sriracha and salad dressing = not worried about all added sugar is that you are being deliberately obtuse, especially given that you replied to both my Halloween candy post and my pear post:
    I joined this challenge to see what I can learn from it. And what I learned was that the added sugar in foods like Sriracha, my lightly sweetened tea, and protein powder, was not a problem for me. My issue, especially this time of year, is baked goods, and that is because of the high calories, which are also coming from flour and fat, not just sugar.

    My mom sees a pear and sees a pear.

    I see a pear and see pear pecan muffins. I've just increased those pear calories from 157 cal in a 258 g D'Anjou pear to 256 calories per muffin x 12 = 3,072 calories. That is way more relevant to me than sugar in Sriracha.


    You are the one who said you weren't concerned about sugar from sources except for baked goods. You were worried about the urge to covert pears to baked goods which includes all sorts of triggers. Someone is being obtuse here and it's not me.

    You seem to just want to debate, so feel free to start a thread in Debate and ping me.
  • yrguideyrguide Posts: 22Member Member Posts: 22Member Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    yrguide wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    yrguide wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    yrguide wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Monday I had no added sugar, and so far none today.

    Although I am tracking everything at the moment just for the experiment, this is the conclusion I came to too. For me, non dessert added sugar tends to be pretty small amounts in savory foods or, most commonly, some sauces or rubs, and I really see no reason to care about that. Plus, it would be hard for that to add up to all that many cals. I really think these no sugar challenges that start by assuming you are eating some huge amount of sugar and then tell you to avoid these incidental sources are rather silly. I think it makes more sense to have people track their sugar, understand where it is coming from, and then consider reasonable changes if it is, in fact, higher than expected, which for most will be reducing snack/dessert foods or sugar-added drinks, with some maybe having more than expected in sugary cereals or trail mixes or granola bars or flavored yogurt. But if someone really loves adding, say, a bit of sugar to coffee or oats, I don't think that's something to be bothered about if the overall nutrition of the day and percentage of added sugar is fine anyway.

    I used to use an example of a rhubarb sauce with a little sugar added vs. a homemade apple sauce. Why is the latter inherently preferable to the former? No good reason IMO. (Even Dr. Greger, who has other issues, no doubt, says that objecting to a little sugar or oil if that is how the overall diet becomes more sustainable and is able to incorporate nutritious foods like oats and veg, is not something to worry about.)

    One of the points of these challenges is educating yourself about how much sugar, especially hidden added sugar, are in your foods. Including savory and sauces.

    You don't care about sugar in sauces? You should. For example, one tablespoon of ketchup contains a full teaspoon of sugar (4 grams). A full 1/3rd of the ketchup you eat is sugar. BBQ sauce like Sweet Baby Rays? Two tablespoons of that sauce contains 4 teaspoons (16 grams) of sugar. So 2/3rds of your BBQ sauce is sugar. What about something savory like a Lean Cuisine? The Chicken Ranch Club contains just over 2 teaspoons of sugar (9 grams). Salad dressings average around a 1 1/2 tsp (6 grams) per tablespoon serving. It all starts adding up in a big way, especially when you should be averaging about 25 grams total per day.

    The more important issue is why calories derived from sugar are worse for you than calories from fats or protein. Sugars almost convert straight to fat and worse yet, calories from sugar keep you hungry. There is a hormone called leptin that increases as you take in calories. As leptin increases it tells your brain that hey, we're full. We've got enough food/energy right now and we should work on storing and using it. If your brain is not getting a signal from leptin it thinks it's hungry. When you take in sugar it raises your insulin levels and insulin blocks the signal from leptin getting to the brain. Sugar, from natural sources, is usually paired with natural fiber which is why fruits are ok, it's considered a slow carb. The fiber in the fruit slows down how quickly the sugar is metabolized into fat.

    Calories in/calories out is only half true, where you get your calories is equally as large an issue.

    You can read more about it here:

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/04/20/so-this-is-exactly-how-sugar-makes-us-fat_a_22046969/

    I also highly recommend everyone watch "That Sugar Film" if you can.

    Oh and PS. Here is an article published in a medical journal outlining the leptin/obesity connection:

    https://www.nature.com/articles/0802753

    As noted upthread, the bigger food manufacturers were required to include "added sugar" to their labels beginning Jan 2020, and many of them had already started when I did this challenge last fall. Once exception was Newman's Ranch salad dressing, which has 1 g total sugar per 30 g of dressing. Since I usually eat 15 g salad dressing per salad (I supply the rest of the "mouth feel" with cottage cheese, which has 6 g of intrinsic sugar per 113 g (more than I add to a salad), of which 0 comes from added sugar), while I logged the half gram of sugar, it was not something I was concerned about.

    My brand of Sriracha, Sky Valley, has 1 g of added sugar per teaspoon.

    I might have BBQ sauce once per year. (Might.)

    Then why are you here if you don't need to cut sugar out of your diet?

    It's similar to the both of you being on a diet when you don't actually need to lose weight then telling others not to worry about logging that slice of cake. Honestly, it's so willfully ignorant it's mind boggling.

    You're clearly intelligent, so I think the only explanation for you equating not worrying about sugar in Sriracha and salad dressing = not worried about all added sugar is that you are being deliberately obtuse, especially given that you replied to both my Halloween candy post and my pear post:
    I joined this challenge to see what I can learn from it. And what I learned was that the added sugar in foods like Sriracha, my lightly sweetened tea, and protein powder, was not a problem for me. My issue, especially this time of year, is baked goods, and that is because of the high calories, which are also coming from flour and fat, not just sugar.

    My mom sees a pear and sees a pear.

    I see a pear and see pear pecan muffins. I've just increased those pear calories from 157 cal in a 258 g D'Anjou pear to 256 calories per muffin x 12 = 3,072 calories. That is way more relevant to me than sugar in Sriracha.


    You are the one who said you weren't concerned about sugar from sources except for baked goods. You were worried about the urge to covert pears to baked goods which includes all sorts of triggers. Someone is being obtuse here and it's not me.

    You seem to just want to debate, so feel free to start a thread in Debate and ping me.

    No, but don't assert one thing when the reality is another, especially when you've written it out.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,446Member Member Posts: 4,446Member Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I joined this challenge to see what I can learn from it. And what I learned was that the added sugar in foods like Sriracha, my lightly sweetened tea, and protein powder, was not a problem for me. My issue, especially this time of year, is baked goods, and that is because of the high calories, which are also coming from flour and fat, not just sugar.

    My mom sees a pear and sees a pear.

    I see a pear and see pear pecan muffins. I've just increased those pear calories from 157 cal in a 258 g D'Anjou pear to 256 calories per muffin x 12 = 3,072 calories. That is way more relevant to me than sugar in Sriracha.

    Heh -- I do think that one thing that has helped me avoid temptation is my natural laziness when it comes to baking. I used to bake a decent amount (and I think I may get back into baking bread), but it was more about the fact my mom didn't really bake when I was growing up and that I thought being able to make an excellent pie crust was an impressive life skill than that I really enjoyed baking. My mind is such that I like cooking (being able to just wing it with ingredients and not use a recipe or memorize proportions or mess around with whether my stupid butter was sufficiently cold), and only on rare occasion like baking. I do know lots of people who love it and are really creative with it, though, and I am always impressed by them.

    Don't know if you've ever watched Top Chef, but I always find it funny when many of them get all flummoxed by any baking challenges (increasingly there are exceptions, however).
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,164Member Member Posts: 21,164Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I joined this challenge to see what I can learn from it. And what I learned was that the added sugar in foods like Sriracha, my lightly sweetened tea, and protein powder, was not a problem for me. My issue, especially this time of year, is baked goods, and that is because of the high calories, which are also coming from flour and fat, not just sugar.

    My mom sees a pear and sees a pear.

    I see a pear and see pear pecan muffins. I've just increased those pear calories from 157 cal in a 258 g D'Anjou pear to 256 calories per muffin x 12 = 3,072 calories. That is way more relevant to me than sugar in Sriracha.

    Heh -- I do think that one thing that has helped me avoid temptation is my natural laziness when it comes to baking. I used to bake a decent amount (and I think I may get back into baking bread), but it was more about the fact my mom didn't really bake when I was growing up and that I thought being able to make an excellent pie crust was an impressive life skill than that I really enjoyed baking. My mind is such that I like cooking (being able to just wing it with ingredients and not use a recipe or memorize proportions or mess around with whether my stupid butter was sufficiently cold), and only on rare occasion like baking. I do know lots of people who love it and are really creative with it, though, and I am always impressed by them.

    Don't know if you've ever watched Top Chef, but I always find it funny when many of them get all flummoxed by any baking challenges (increasingly there are exceptions, however).

    I LOVE baking bread - something about the yeast and the rising really does it for me. I left my Bosch bread mixer behind in a move in 2004 because, while I wasn't counting calories then, I realized I wasn't doing myself any favors by eating almost a loaf of bread (with butter) at a time.

    I'm thinking about getting back to it, and am working on strategies to moderate, like making rolls, and freezing most of a batch. This has worked well recently. I still have some in the freezer from a few weeks ago. With pita bread, instead of making 10, I divided the dough into 16 (100 calories each), only cooked 4, and froze the remaining 12. I brought 6 to Mom's and cooked them there, had one, and shared the rest. Sharing is an important strategy for me for moderating baking ;)

    The pita bread has 2 t sugar, so 8 g total, so a half a gram and 2 calories per serving. This illustrates again for me that for many foods it's not the added sugar that is a problem for me, but in this case the calories from flour, and to a lesser extent, the butter I would add.

    While I do find starches like potatoes and rice filling, bread doesn't especially fill me up, so I will consider making adorable little 50 calorie pitas.

    I'd really rather be making big crusty loaves of bread though :(

    My Gramma made the best pies...my mom used to make the worse pie crusts, back when butter was the devil. She'd use whole wheat flour and oil, yuck. I'm sure Gramma used white flour and lard.

    I also think being able to make an excellent pie crust is an impressive skill, but never got the hang of rolling dough until I bought a different roller (and still haven't gotten into making pies - I've been using it for savory foods. I'll leave the pies to my mother and sister. Pies once or twice a year is enough for me.)
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Posts: 491Member Member Posts: 491Member Member
    Morning 🌞

    Yesterday’s stats - 19 total grams sugar/ none added. I had pomegranate! 😋 Amazing I never had pomegranate growing up —- love these lil suckers.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,446Member Member Posts: 4,446Member Member
    I don't think I've ever had whole pomegranate, just the seeds. I should try it.

    I've been enjoying apples lately (as reported in the Produce thread), and have some pears (different types) waiting to be consumed too.
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Posts: 491Member Member Posts: 491Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I don't think I've ever had whole pomegranate, just the seeds. I should try it.

    I've been enjoying apples lately (as reported in the Produce thread), and have some pears (different types) waiting to be consumed too.

    Ooooh love pears! Of all varieties!

    The only thing about whole poms - I have yet to perfect deseeding them lol. It’s an half hour extravaganza ha

    🍐 🍎 💗
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Posts: 491Member Member Posts: 491Member Member
    Hi Guys,

    Food packed and ready for the day!

    Total sugars - 7.1/ 0 Added.

    I have a bell pepper fetish going on. I could eat them all day long like candy.

    wo0h8pksb65x.jpeg
    edited January 14
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,446Member Member Posts: 4,446Member Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I joined this challenge to see what I can learn from it. And what I learned was that the added sugar in foods like Sriracha, my lightly sweetened tea, and protein powder, was not a problem for me. My issue, especially this time of year, is baked goods, and that is because of the high calories, which are also coming from flour and fat, not just sugar.

    My mom sees a pear and sees a pear.

    I see a pear and see pear pecan muffins. I've just increased those pear calories from 157 cal in a 258 g D'Anjou pear to 256 calories per muffin x 12 = 3,072 calories. That is way more relevant to me than sugar in Sriracha.

    Heh -- I do think that one thing that has helped me avoid temptation is my natural laziness when it comes to baking. I used to bake a decent amount (and I think I may get back into baking bread), but it was more about the fact my mom didn't really bake when I was growing up and that I thought being able to make an excellent pie crust was an impressive life skill than that I really enjoyed baking. My mind is such that I like cooking (being able to just wing it with ingredients and not use a recipe or memorize proportions or mess around with whether my stupid butter was sufficiently cold), and only on rare occasion like baking. I do know lots of people who love it and are really creative with it, though, and I am always impressed by them.

    Don't know if you've ever watched Top Chef, but I always find it funny when many of them get all flummoxed by any baking challenges (increasingly there are exceptions, however).

    I LOVE baking bread - something about the yeast and the rising really does it for me. I left my Bosch bread mixer behind in a move in 2004 because, while I wasn't counting calories then, I realized I wasn't doing myself any favors by eating almost a loaf of bread (with butter) at a time.

    I'm thinking about getting back to it, and am working on strategies to moderate, like making rolls, and freezing most of a batch. This has worked well recently. I still have some in the freezer from a few weeks ago. With pita bread, instead of making 10, I divided the dough into 16 (100 calories each), only cooked 4, and froze the remaining 12. I brought 6 to Mom's and cooked them there, had one, and shared the rest. Sharing is an important strategy for me for moderating baking ;)

    The pita bread has 2 t sugar, so 8 g total, so a half a gram and 2 calories per serving. This illustrates again for me that for many foods it's not the added sugar that is a problem for me, but in this case the calories from flour, and to a lesser extent, the butter I would add.

    While I do find starches like potatoes and rice filling, bread doesn't especially fill me up, so I will consider making adorable little 50 calorie pitas.

    I'd really rather be making big crusty loaves of bread though :(

    My Gramma made the best pies...my mom used to make the worse pie crusts, back when butter was the devil. She'd use whole wheat flour and oil, yuck. I'm sure Gramma used white flour and lard.

    I also think being able to make an excellent pie crust is an impressive skill, but never got the hang of rolling dough until I bought a different roller (and still haven't gotten into making pies - I've been using it for savory foods. I'll leave the pies to my mother and sister. Pies once or twice a year is enough for me.)

    My mom hated making pie and would -- the horror! -- use the store-bought crust. Mostly my grandmother (dad's stepmom) would make them for family gatherings. My mom liked making cookies, but that was about it. It was a fun thing to help with when we were kids.

    I find breadmaking relaxing, or used to, and I'm not that bad about overindulging in it (I think), so I think I may try making some whole grain bread soon, maybe this weekend. It's been at least 5 years since I've made anything but pizza crust.

    If it's too tempting I will bring it to work and put it in the breakroom. ;-)
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,446Member Member Posts: 4,446Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I don't think I've ever had whole pomegranate, just the seeds. I should try it.

    I've been enjoying apples lately (as reported in the Produce thread), and have some pears (different types) waiting to be consumed too.

    Ooooh love pears! Of all varieties!

    The only thing about whole poms - I have yet to perfect deseeding them lol. It’s an half hour extravaganza ha

    🍐 🍎 💗

    Yeah, pears are one of my favorites.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,164Member Member Posts: 21,164Member Member
    Hi Guys,

    Food packed and ready for the day!

    Total sugars - 7.1/ 0 Added.

    I have a bell pepper fetish going on. I could eat them all day long like candy.

    wo0h8pksb65x.jpeg

    My mom grew so many bell peppers this year...I should have taken a picture when she harvested them ahead of the frost. I gave away bags to my neighbors.

    She did better with cucumbers this year - only grew one kind. The year before she grew three kinds and there was a crazy amount of cukes!
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Posts: 491Member Member Posts: 491Member Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Hi Guys,

    Food packed and ready for the day!

    Total sugars - 7.1/ 0 Added.

    I have a bell pepper fetish going on. I could eat them all day long like candy.

    wo0h8pksb65x.jpeg

    My mom grew so many bell peppers this year...I should have taken a picture when she harvested them ahead of the frost. I gave away bags to my neighbors.

    She did better with cucumbers this year - only grew one kind. The year before she grew three kinds and there was a crazy amount of cukes!

    @kshama2001 - I bet that garden was lovely! So fragrant too! I’ve been in the garden Thred — already have spring fever and can wait to get planting! Going to try to grow some veggies and fruits!

    Then we’ll have to do stats for sugars and home grown items — lol 😉
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,446Member Member Posts: 4,446Member Member
    I'm going to try to grow some extra tomatoes and cucumbers this year. The tomatoes to can them (I had extra this year and sadly they went to waste) and the cucumbers (and maybe some other veg) for pickling.

    Also I'm going to try and use the winter for planning. Last year it's like all of a sudden it was late April and I was completely unprepared.
    edited January 14
  • lorrainequiche59lorrainequiche59 Posts: 737Member Member Posts: 737Member Member
    Been holding the course for 2 weeks. No added sugar. Someone had referred to a 2 week sugar-free challenge & I decided to do it. AND I've done it & am carrying on. I'm an emotional eater & today I had a stressful situation that would have had me eating out of the sugar bowl to soothe my stress. I find without added sugar, I don't crave, so it's easier to control the temptation to soothe my feelings. Pouring a warm bath instead of feeding the feelings 👍
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,446Member Member Posts: 4,446Member Member
    Been holding the course for 2 weeks. No added sugar. Someone had referred to a 2 week sugar-free challenge & I decided to do it. AND I've done it & am carrying on. I'm an emotional eater & today I had a stressful situation that would have had me eating out of the sugar bowl to soothe my stress. I find without added sugar, I don't crave, so it's easier to control the temptation to soothe my feelings. Pouring a warm bath instead of feeding the feelings 👍

    Yay! My first experiment with cutting out added sugar was part of dealing with emotional and stress eating, too. I combined it with not snacking, which was the part I stuck with, but since a lot of the stuff I used to impulse emotional eat at my office tended to have sugar in it, it was helpful in that I had checked them off as not available while I was doing the challenge.
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