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The House of Different Diets

samspam1023samspam1023 Posts: 39Member Member Posts: 39Member Member
The background: My husband has had great success with keto (down 25 lbs so far), but I'm struggling with my own diet in the process. I don't want to go keto myself because I'm a distance runner. But logging my meals for the last two weeks, I'm eating around 40% fat. I gained 10 lbs last half-marathon season and didn't make the speed gains I hoped for. I'd like my macros to be around 40/30/30 for the off-season but I'm struggling to incorporate low-fat proteins. We also have a small child and I want to make sure he's eating a healthy variety of foods too.

The question: has anyone had success managing two separate diets in a household? Did you find it to be very expensive (it has been for us to buy smaller quantities and different types of food for each of us). Any advice?

Replies

  • katermarikatermari Posts: 89Member, Premium Member Posts: 89Member, Premium Member
    i myself am a pescatarian and my husband eats everything. i do understand how tough it can be.
  • erjones11erjones11 Posts: 207Member Member Posts: 207Member Member
    There are four of us in our household and we all have different dietary requirements.

    My oldest son is a vegetarian and we all partake in that some times but the rest of us do eat meat as well.

    My wife will no eat any fish, eggs or pork because she doesn't want to. But she will eat way more vegetables and other things then our oldest.

    My youngest son will eat anything, except what our oldest eats!

    As for me I monitor my macros and calories very carefully.

    Some nights our kitchen is like a restaurant in that everyone gets a different plated meal. Most of the time I cook for myself and my wife cooks for everyone else, though occasionally the boys also prepare their own meals. I will cook for others if they want what I am eating, rarely.

    Some nights we cook together each preparing different dishes that are shared for those who want to eat them.

    Friday nights we always eat as a family and mostly eat whatever she prepares (she always includes a vegetarian option), often I will make a side vegetable dish or prepare something if it supports what she has in mind. Desert and baking are among my specialties so I often make Friday's desert choice and rarely eat it. Generally speaking Friday I eat whatever she prepares and do the best I can to measure and log it.

    To answer OP's question our approach is probably expensive as we all shop together each selecting our own stuff except the total omnivore youngest, who steals everyone else's food. But we don't care too much about the expense as it is what works for us.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 20,226Member Member Posts: 20,226Member Member
    The background: My husband has had great success with keto (down 25 lbs so far), but I'm struggling with my own diet in the process. I don't want to go keto myself because I'm a distance runner. But logging my meals for the last two weeks, I'm eating around 40% fat. I gained 10 lbs last half-marathon season and didn't make the speed gains I hoped for. I'd like my macros to be around 40/30/30 for the off-season but I'm struggling to incorporate low-fat proteins. We also have a small child and I want to make sure he's eating a healthy variety of foods too.

    The question: has anyone had success managing two separate diets in a household? Did you find it to be very expensive (it has been for us to buy smaller quantities and different types of food for each of us). Any advice?

    Seems like your husband can have a lower fat protein and low carb veg and add some fat (cheese, etc.) and you and your child could eat the same protein and veg and add starches (?)
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 20,226Member Member Posts: 20,226Member Member
    Also, sometimes the meals my OH and I share look very dissimilar. For instance, he will have a giant burger and bun, while I will have a 4 oz burger with a giant salad and a handful of tortilla chips. I make my salad and get out his condiments; he grills and takes care of his burger.

    When we have steak, he has potato salad and green salad; I make Thai beef salad for me.

    In general, I have proportionally more protein and veggies; he has more carbs.
  • stephie_nycstephie_nyc Posts: 41Member Member Posts: 41Member Member
    My partner is pescatarian and it can be a struggle. Would it be very difficult for you to cook two different proteins with whatever sides you are having for dinner? Lean meat for you and something with more fat for him. Then you can decide which protein the kids will have. I get it though. I rarely make my boyfriend and I separate proteins. I control our calorie differences with our sides dishes and carbs.
  • 33gail3333gail33 Posts: 231Member Member Posts: 231Member Member
    I am pescatarian and my husband eats everything, I make a LOT of vegan meals. He eats whatever I make him for dinner - and packs his own lunch. We eat out a couple of times a week. He doesnt need to eat meat at every single meal so it works for us that he generally eats it at restaurants or lunch. Unless you are eating every single meal together it's probably workable to eat one common meal a day that suits everyone.
  • katshearekatsheare Posts: 777Member Member Posts: 777Member Member
    What are your usual sources of protein? I'm assuming that's a slightly separate issue to the different diets thing?

    Caveat: I am no expert and (occasionally do struggle with getting my full MFP-recommended amount of protein in a day), but for me fish (we do include some oily fish for the healthy Omegas but also non-oily fish, do that about 2 - 3 nights a week), eggs, beans and legumes (because you can sneak lentils into ANYTHING!!) all help top up my protein without going too fat crazy. We also do a lot of cooking without fats, or with very little (heart health there as well) and steamed fish works a treat. We don't cook red meat, pork or poultry at home (my partner doesn't eat them and I don't like cooking meat) so barring the occasional meaty meal out that's us.

    I will also say that our small person - who has many texture issues with food - loves beans and legumes. I know sometimes parents are warned about introducing them too soon, but I've not found digestive issues for him with them.

    I also love Quark - it's a more intense, high-protein yogurt-type thing. I use that instead of yogurt, sour cream, toppings on puds....

    Just taking a really swift look at some of your recent diary entries, be aware that processed meats and cheese are both going to have a fat (and sodium, if you're tracking that as well) impact, as well as their protein element. Not that you have to stay away from them, just be aware that that's where some of those macros are coming from.
  • acpgeeacpgee Posts: 4,214Member Member Posts: 4,214Member Member
    Here are some recipes that are essentially meat/oil with veg where I don't miss the optional carbs. But make the accompanying carbs for the rest of the family.

    optional addition of rice with Thai nam prik ong and Cambodian beef lok lak, both are meat with veg
    https://importfood.com/recipes/recipe/201-spicy-pork-and-tomato-dip-with-veggies-nam-prik-ong
    https://refugeekitchen.com/2014/04/04/khmer-lok-lak/

    Italian bagna cauda and provencal grande alioli are essentially fat with veg. Keto family member can skip the bread in bagna cauda and the new potatoes in grande alioli. The bagna cauda recipe below is an appetizer. In a traditional Piedmont meal, you would scramble eggs in the last of the sauce for extra protein.
    https://umamigirl.com/bagna-cauda-crudites-appetizer/
    https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/grand-aioli

    These are salads which serve as mains where the keto family member can skip the potato.
    https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/gado-gado-salad
    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/apr/18/pierre-koffmann-recipe-for-salade-nicoise-with-seared-tuna
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