What does 100g of (fill in blank) look like?

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ahoy_m8
ahoy_m8 Posts: 3,053 Member
Today specifically, I'm wondering what 100g of frosted layer cake looks like. Because I'm going to a party with cake tonight and I've saved calories for it. I'm pretty good at eyeballing the things I eat often, but cake isn't one of them, sadly.

It occurs to me that it might be helpful to have a thread documenting serving sizes for all kinds of foods (especially those you might get at a restaurant). I know some people have a habit of photographing their food. I don't have this habit bit I will come back and post next time I plate and weigh something for the good of the cause.

If anyone has a pic of cake with weight (doesn't have to be 100g exactly), I would really appreciate it! And please post anything else that might be a good visual reference. Cheers!

Replies

  • sullus
    sullus Posts: 2,839 Member
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    No Cake, but this is interesting: http://100-grams.blogspot.com/
  • ahoy_m8
    ahoy_m8 Posts: 3,053 Member
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    That's awesome! Thanks a ton for that!
  • jwoolman5
    jwoolman5 Posts: 191 Member
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    Maybe you could just look up calories for a certain fraction of a cake like what you are eating and go by that.
  • apullum
    apullum Posts: 4,838 Member
    edited December 2019
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    It doesn’t matter what 100 grams of some other cake looks like. That cake wasn’t made with the same recipe as the cake you’re eating, so the calories/macros are not the same. Depending on how different the recipes are, the calories may be extremely different.

    No one can do more than estimate the calories of food they didn’t make themselves. Log your best guess and move on.
  • moonangel12
    moonangel12 Posts: 971 Member
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    sullus wrote: »
    No Cake, but this is interesting: http://100-grams.blogspot.com/

    Fun visual and run down - thanks!
  • moonangel12
    moonangel12 Posts: 971 Member
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    apullum wrote: »
    It doesn’t matter what 100 grams of some other cake looks like. That cake wasn’t made with the same recipe as the cake you’re eating, so the calories/macros are not the same. Depending on how different the recipes are, the calories may be extremely different.

    No one can do more than estimate the calories of food they didn’t make themselves. Log your best guess and move on.

    Valid points, for sure, but I think the OP was just trying to get an idea of what it might look like so they can eye ball it during a social function and they don’t have any option to do it on their own prior to going... that way when they log their guesstimate before or after it has a chance to be in the ball park rather than 500g of generic cake eaten compared to the 150g logged. Some is denser, some is fattier, it won’t be exact, but it’s a fighting chance.

  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,986 Member
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    A 100 g slice would be slightly smaller than the "standard" 1/12 of a nine-inch layer cake, at least according to the only entry I could find on the USDA database for a prepared, frosted cake that gave info both for 100 g and for a piece of cake that is 1/12 of the cake (if you find that difficult to visualize, picture cutting the cake into quarters, and then cutting each of those quarters into three equal slices.

    I think as long as you're talking about a traditional sponge (e.g., not angel food, not flourless, not fruit cake, no nuts or nut meal in the batter), that proportion of weight to volume should be a reasonable ball-park estimate. Of course if you're not in the U.S. and your sponges and frosting recipes are very different, I'd look for some data from closer to home.

    https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/172698/nutrients