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Body Positive Workout Clothes Women's Thing, Not Men's?

Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 804Member Member Posts: 804Member Member
The following thread discussing workout clothing made me notice something and ask this question.

https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10774888/body-positive-menswear/p1

I was doing some Christmas shopping on the website of a well known athletic apparel manufacturer. I noticed they had some plus size/obese female models along with their typical models, but all the male models were the typical models you would see on a fitness apparel website.

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Since this is a large company with a large marketing budget, everything the do is for a reason. My thought was body positive sells for females but not for men.




edited December 2019
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Replies

  • hesn92hesn92 Posts: 5,799Member Member Posts: 5,799Member Member
    I think it's just what will boost sales. In my experience, women tend to be much more concerned about appearances than men. Not all across the board of course. So it makes sense that women would be more susceptible to feeling inadequate by always seeing perfectly sculpted and thin models and "instagram stars" etc. at every corner, thus the push to add models of different shapes and sizes. I don't think that is very prevalent among men, but I could be wrong.
  • LobsterboxtopsLobsterboxtops Posts: 94Member Member Posts: 94Member Member
    I’m going to make a generalization here, but in my experience men are more utilitarian in their clothes preferences and how they shop than woean. I say this as being the exception to that generalization;). From my observation of watching men shop, there is less of a visualization component to shopping, it’s more about will that piece work for my needs, do I like the color, and is it available in my size.

    There is also less division in men’s clothes based on size. Men’s Warehouse sells small through 6X, it’s a rare women’s store that would have that range of sizes.

    To be honest I was confused by the original question about body positive men’s sportswe and a little confused by this one. I mean at the end of the day are you looking for different models or different clothing?


  • RCPVRCPV Posts: 397Member Member Posts: 397Member Member
    I’m going to make a generalization here, but in my experience men are more utilitarian in their clothes preferences and how they shop than woean. I say this as being the exception to that generalization;). From my observation of watching men shop, there is less of a visualization component to shopping, it’s more about will that piece work for my needs, do I like the color, and is it available in my size.



    ,

    I think that's true for a lot of men, but I've noticed that a good lot of the younger 20-something's are very clothes-conscious. They want to look good no matter what they're doing, even just working out at the gym. I think the OP was saying, and please correct me if I'm wrong, that options for men, as far as how workout clothes will look on them if they're heavier, are limited. The sporting clothing manufacturers and retailers show heavier women in workout clothes, but the same options aren't available for the men. The men's clothing lines show clothing on young, fit men, so heavier guys can't see how that would look on them. They just have to order the larger size and cross their fingers.

    [quote="

    To be honest I was confused by the original question about body positive men’s sportswe and a little confused by this one. I mean at the end of the day are you looking for different models or different clothing?


    [/quote]

    As far as the original question on the other post, I think he was looking for both. He specifically asked about yoga pants for men. You can buy yoga-specific clothing for women across the price spectrum AND see how it will look on heavier women, but men's yoga clothing is difficult to find. You also only see thinner, fitter men's models.

  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,497Member Member Posts: 3,497Member Member
    Bootzey wrote: »
    I don't think men care. Not like we do. Also... Men's clothes don't offer the same options as women's clothes. So it doesn't matter

    What do you mean by men's clothes don't offer the same options? What type of men's (and women's) clothes and what type of options? I do think that some men care about this just as much as some women do, but I think that hegemonic masculinity tells men that being vulnerable in any way shape or form, including being unhappy about clothing options if you aren't traditionally attractive, is a form of being weak and that mean should not under any circumstances show any form of weakness.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 21,530Member Member Posts: 21,530Member Member
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    This thread has shifted substantially from the OP's question, but to address that, I think it's simply that many (if not most) guys, regardless of reality, can look at an ad full of typical male fitness models and tell themselves "yeah that's pretty much me" or "a few weeks in the gym and that's pretty much me," whereas females may have a less inflated sense of how they look. Seeing models who represent their actual body type in the ad probably has more of a benefit, whereas if a guy sees his actual body-type in the ad, he might think "these are workout clothes for fat guys.. and that's obviously not me!" even when it very well may be.

    I couldn't disagree more. I don't believe for a second that most men believe they more or less look like fitness models. I think that's actually a pretty insulting statement to make. You may be correct that women overall may be harder on themselves when it comes to their body image, but I don't believe that makes it true that men generally have an "inflated" sense of how they look or are out of touch with reality. I struggle with body image as much as anyone else, and definitely have areas I am looking to improve, but I also think its important to try to feel comfortable in my own skin. I think a lot of a woman's perspective may have to do with the body types you see glamorized every day on the cover of Cosmo, or a hundred other magazines, but that has nothing to do with how men perceive themselves.

    Yeah, the men in my life (who discuss such things with me) all seem to be realistic about what their bodies look like. And they're not immune to comparing themselves with men who are held up as "ideals" and feeling the same range of emotions that I know I am capable of in such situations.

    I'm not saying there aren't men with an inflated sense of how they look, but the rise of eating disorders and other disordered body-related behaviors in young men is letting us clearly know that there isn't some male immunity to understanding that your body isn't fitness model perfect and feeling bad about it.
  • wmd1979wmd1979 Posts: 442Member Member Posts: 442Member Member
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    This thread has shifted substantially from the OP's question, but to address that, I think it's simply that many (if not most) guys, regardless of reality, can look at an ad full of typical male fitness models and tell themselves "yeah that's pretty much me" or "a few weeks in the gym and that's pretty much me," whereas females may have a less inflated sense of how they look. Seeing models who represent their actual body type in the ad probably has more of a benefit, whereas if a guy sees his actual body-type in the ad, he might think "these are workout clothes for fat guys.. and that's obviously not me!" even when it very well may be.

    I couldn't disagree more. I don't believe for a second that most men believe they more or less look like fitness models. I think that's actually a pretty insulting statement to make. You may be correct that women overall may be harder on themselves when it comes to their body image, but I don't believe that makes it true that men generally have an "inflated" sense of how they look or are out of touch with reality. I struggle with body image as much as anyone else, and definitely have areas I am looking to improve, but I also think its important to try to feel comfortable in my own skin. I think a lot of a woman's perspective may have to do with the body types you see glamorized every day on the cover of Cosmo, or a hundred other magazines, but that has nothing to do with how men perceive themselves.

    Yeah, the men in my life (who discuss such things with me) all seem to be realistic about what their bodies look like. And they're not immune to comparing themselves with men who are held up as "ideals" and feeling the same range of emotions that I know I am capable of in such situations.

    I'm not saying there aren't men with an inflated sense of how they look, but the rise of eating disorders and other disordered body-related behaviors in young men is letting us clearly know that there isn't some male immunity to understanding that your body isn't fitness model perfect and feeling bad about it.

    You make a good point, as does @aokoye when stating that men typically are not encouraged to be outwardly vulnerable about the topic. There are definitely areas I would like to improve, but I wouldn't ever really feel compelled to have a conversation with anyone about it(outside of this forum of course).
  • tbright1965tbright1965 Posts: 841Member, Premium Member Posts: 841Member, Premium Member
    My n=1 on how men view how they look goes as follows.

    I have a more healthy view of how I look now compared to when I was 17. I look back on photos of me when I was 17 and ask how I could have thought I was not attractive.



    Probably good in the long term as I may have turned out differently had I realized how attractive I was. I may have been even MORE of a jerk than I am :)

    As I got older, and fatter, I was able to lie/fool myself into believing that I wasn't fat.


    It would be interesting to see how accurate people, in general, view themselves vs how others view them with respect to attractiveness.
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