Beginner runner planning a 5k - help!

My friend has just signed us up for my 1st 5k in June!

I’m currently out of shape after 2 babies and although I know how I can improve that (I’ve had good results from HIIT videos and they fit my schedule) I have never ever been a runner.

I’ve downloaded the couch to 5k app but any other advice on what I can do to get up to speed (excise the pun) and build my confidence would be very much appreciated!

Thanks!

Replies

  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,840 Member
    Go to a running store and get fitted for good running shoes! It makes a big difference.

    Six months is a ton of time. C25k is a great program and I have seen it take many people literally from not running at all to their first race and beyond. If you can walk briskly for 30 minutes without problems you are ready for c25k. Just follow it, three days a week, don’t be afraid to repeat weeks if you have trouble, and soon your confidence will naturally increase as you put miles behind you. Running with a friend can be a good way to feel less self conscious about running in public at first.

    You got this! Good luck.
  • tecat810
    tecat810 Posts: 4,357 Member
    I started running last january and have run 2 5k's since and run 6 miles on my long run days! You can do this! Follow the couch to 5k program. it does work.be consistent and if you find a day too hard, repeat it if you have time to! Load upna great playlist and have some fun. Best wishes to you!
  • debrakgoogins
    debrakgoogins Posts: 2,034 Member
    Good running shoes and good socks are your first stop.

    Take it slow and follow the program. You have plenty of time to be ready for your race. Pushing too hard, too fast can lead to overuse injuries. Trust me, stress fractures are no fun.

    Whenever possible, run outside. Get used to running in all different weather patterns and understand how it affects your running. Running on a treadmill is good for bad weather days but it isn't the same as running outside. Outside, you can feel the road with inclines and declines, pebbles, etc plus the scenery is better outdoors.

    If you can, incorporate yoga into your routine. Not only does it increase your flexibility but it also helps with balance and core strength. Yoga by Adriene is a free on YouTube. She has a fantastic yoga video for runners.
  • davethebass67
    davethebass67 Posts: 1 Member
    Just going to start myself so good luck
  • moonangel12
    moonangel12 Posts: 971 Member
    Ditto the above recommendation for good running shoes that fit properly! I started back last summer with my old shoes (that I was fitted for, but didn’t quite realize just how old and shot they were) and quickly found myself miserable with shin splints. My local shop got me back going with proper shoes and tips for shifting my stride from a strong heel strike to one that’s not quite as hard on my joints. A year and a half later I am still going, pain free!

    And definitely no need to rush the process, you have plenty of time, so if one week is particularly difficult give yourself permission to repeat those intervals an extra time or two (or three!). There is a decent jump in run time either in week 4 or 5 that I just wasn’t ready for so I kept with the current set until I felt like I could handle it.

    Have fun! :smile:
  • dewd2
    dewd2 Posts: 2,449 Member
    Since you have 6 months I suggest once you finish the C25K program you keep going with the 10k program. Work your way up to running 6 or more miles by June and you'll have a blast running the 5k.

    Good luck.
  • cask16
    cask16 Posts: 196 Member
    Wow such useful and positive replies thanks everyone!
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 7,226 Member
    Professionally fitted shoes are worth every nickel. Quality socks. A stick of anti-chafing balm for when the bat wings decide to go all flappy and rubby at totally random and electrically painful times.

    My weight trainer is a big runner. One good piece of advice she gave me is to find a route with hills to build endurance, and to never speed up going downhill. That’s when injuries happen.

    Oh, and mind the magnolia “cones” and fallen nuts and such on the path. I’ve seen people roll their ankles on them.
  • moonangel12
    moonangel12 Posts: 971 Member
    edited January 2020
    Professionally fitted shoes are worth every nickel. Quality socks. A stick of anti-chafing balm for when the bat wings decide to go all flappy and rubby at totally random and electrically painful times.

    My weight trainer is a big runner. One good piece of advice she gave me is to find a route with hills to build endurance, and to never speed up going downhill. That’s when injuries happen.

    Oh, and mind the magnolia “cones” and fallen nuts and such on the path. I’ve seen people roll their ankles on them.
    No joke! I live in “Shady Acres” - a 30+ year old neighborhood that lives up to its name with an ample supply of a variety of mature nut trees (close to 20 on our half acre lot alone). I had to call a dusk run quits this fall due to fresh debris including hickory nuts and acorns hidden under slick leaves. I didn’t even make it a mile before I decided it wasn’t worth the potential injury.
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,840 Member
    Professionally fitted shoes are worth every nickel. Quality socks. A stick of anti-chafing balm for when the bat wings decide to go all flappy and rubby at totally random and electrically painful times.

    My weight trainer is a big runner. One good piece of advice she gave me is to find a route with hills to build endurance, and to never speed up going downhill. That’s when injuries happen.

    Oh, and mind the magnolia “cones” and fallen nuts and such on the path. I’ve seen people roll their ankles on them.
    No joke! I live in “Shady Acres” - a 30+ year old neighborhood that lives up to its name with an ample supply of a variety of mature nut trees (close to 20 on our half acre lot alone). I had to call a disk run quits this fall due to fresh debris including hickory nuts and acorns hidden under slick leaves. I didn’t even make it a mile before I decided it wasn’t worth the potential injury.
    Here it’s pecan and sweet gum trees. I love eating pecans, but running on them is like suddenly discovering you’re wearing only one roller skate!
  • cask16
    cask16 Posts: 196 Member
    Update!
    C25k day 1 done today!

    While I’d forgotten the impact of running on uneven concrete (vs a treadmill) I got through it and pressed as much as I could to run little more and mainly walk up to 5k.

  • emmamcgarity
    emmamcgarity Posts: 1,591 Member
    cask16 wrote: »
    Update!
    C25k day 1 done today!

    While I’d forgotten the impact of running on uneven concrete (vs a treadmill) I got through it and pressed as much as I could to run little more and mainly walk up to 5k.
    Great job starting! If you have trouble getting through a run segment just repeat that day the next time you run. And run SLOWLY during the run segments. It will help your body build up and avoid injury.