Stationary Bike Recommendations?

Hi guys,
I'm looking to buy a stationary/spin bike for my home gym and wondering what the best ones are out there?
I don't have any specific requirements, apart from a high weight capacity and sturdy frame.

Please, I'd love to hear your suggestions as I've read far too many reviews and can't figure out which ones to believe!

Thanks in advance :)

Replies

  • jhanleybrown
    jhanleybrown Posts: 240 Member
    Really like Keiser m3i. Commercial grade spin bike.
  • TwistedSassette
    TwistedSassette Posts: 8,583 Member
    Really like Keiser m3i. Commercial grade spin bike.

    Thanks, I'll check it out!
  • snowshoe072
    snowshoe072 Posts: 4,529 Member
    I have a Bladez Echelon love it
  • TwistedSassette
    TwistedSassette Posts: 8,583 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    I rank "indoor bicycles" like this ...

    1) Smart trainer with real bicycle.
    2) Dumb trainer with real bicycle.
    3) Commercial grade spin bike.
    4) Other spin bike.
    5) Commercial grade stationary bike.
    6) Other stationary bike.
    7) Under desk thing.


    Also look into Zwift as a program to use with your "indoor bicycle" setup.

    Thanks...I think. Not sure what a smart trainer or dumb trainer are, but I don't really have the space for a "real bicycle" setup. Do you have a brand recommendation for spin bikes?
  • TwistedSassette
    TwistedSassette Posts: 8,583 Member
    I have a Bladez Echelon love it

    Thanks, I'll have a look at that one :)
  • aliciap0116
    aliciap0116 Posts: 231 Member
    I just got the Schwinn IC3 and am happy with it as a low cost (relatively), sturdy alternative. If I were doing it again I would get the IC4 which has magnetic rather than physical resistance (like the peloton, but without the built in monitor) so I could follow some workouts that measure resistance and revolution. The IC3 only addresses revolution with manual adjustments for resistance. I measure exertion based on my Apple Watch so it's not the end of the world but having more online class options would have been a plus for just a few hundred more.
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    I rank "indoor bicycles" like this ...

    1) Smart trainer with real bicycle.
    2) Dumb trainer with real bicycle.
    3) Commercial grade spin bike.
    4) Other spin bike.
    5) Commercial grade stationary bike.
    6) Other stationary bike.
    7) Under desk thing.


    Also look into Zwift as a program to use with your "indoor bicycle" setup.

    Thanks...I think. Not sure what a smart trainer or dumb trainer are, but I don't really have the space for a "real bicycle" setup. Do you have a brand recommendation for spin bikes?

    A smart trainer is a device that you hook your bike up to (real bike) that provides resistance, measures power (in watts - typically pretty accurately +/- 2% at most new), can be set to hold your power at a specific wattage, and most of them can also be wirelessly connected to programs like Zwift, TrainerRoad, and Sufferfest and will allow those programs to set the resistance of the trainer. A dumb trainer is a device that you hook up your bike to and only provides resistance. Whether or not it will take up more space than a spin bike is more or less an issue of how long the spin bike is, so I would take the dimensions of whatever spin bikes are on your list of options into consideration if you're dead set on one of those (you mentioned your specific requirements were high weight capacity and a sturdy frame but nothing about space).

    I personally rarely use a spin bike and only at the gym so I can't give you first hand reviews, but I suspect anything by Stages would be good. My personal needs would be best met by something like one of these if I were in the market for a spin bike like thing, but that's me.
  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,977 Member
    LeMond RevMaster Pro.

    Virtually indestructible, weighs over 100#s. Kevlar belt and heavy flywheel resulting in very smooth & quiet pedaling. Fully modifiable w/real bike parts, including clipons and optional seats that I put on mine

    An older model that's still used in many gyms which speaks for itself. Can still be purchased new for about $1. Well worth the price.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,249 Member
    +1 on the LeMond RevMasters.....my tri club uses them for dryland training and they're built like tanks. In addition they allow you to really dial in the fit (seat height & fore/aft; handlebar height & distance from seat).

    They're a bit pricey but it'll give you a lifetime of service.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,454 Member
    If you would like a fan style bike (with arm motion) we have a Rogue Echo bike. Built like a tank and lower cost than it's major competitors.
  • SwindonJogger
    SwindonJogger Posts: 325 Member
    i have had a keiser m3 for 10 years and it has been faultless. Having visible gears on the display is a very useful feature you don't see on most spin bikes. If i had to buy something else then i would look at the Rogue echo if i was into Tabata style workouts. The Concept 2 erg bike also looks very good, they make great fitness equipment so i would be confident it would be very reliable.
  • tuckerrj
    tuckerrj Posts: 1,453 Member
    I got tired of buying cheap equipment and having it wear out or break down after a year. So the last time we bought a Life Fitness machine, like they have at our local gym. We've had it for over 3 years and have never regretted paying the price for a quality machine. https://shop.lifefitness.com/c1-lifecycle-exercise-bike
  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,977 Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    LeMond RevMaster Pro.

    Virtually indestructible, weighs over 100#s. Kevlar belt and heavy flywheel resulting in very smooth & quiet pedaling. Fully modifiable w/real bike parts, including clipons and optional seats that I put on mine

    An older model that's still used in many gyms which speaks for itself. Can still be purchased new for about $1. Well worth the price.

    Correction: LeMond RevMaster Pros can stll purchased for about $1000.
  • MikePfirrman
    MikePfirrman Posts: 3,307 Member
    edited January 2020
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    If you would like a fan style bike (with arm motion) we have a Rogue Echo bike. Built like a tank and lower cost than it's major competitors.

    If you're not going to take the bike on the road and will never care about "performance" biking (like training for road races), I would agree with this. Rogue Echo is affordable, works the entire body (has arms that move like an elliptical), is built incredibly well, is affordable (like $700) and will retain its value over time.

    It's an "Assault" style bike. The beauty about Assault Bikes is they are air driven (no motors to break) and are as hard as your fitness will allow. If you're newer to working out, they are fantastic. Once you're in shape, they will crush you. Intervals on Assault bikes are similar to intervals on rowers. Very, very hard -- but only if you want them to be.

    I train fanatically. I have Assault Bike (the AD Pro, very similar to the Rogue Echo). It whips my butt. But that's only because I'm trying to generate max Watts on it. My wife, who is 58, and the more casual exerciser, also loves it! Where I might burn 800 calories in an hour, she'll use the same bike and burn 350 or 400 on it. It appeals to all users too -- young and old. If I had my choice, I would have gotten the Rogue Echo over the AD Pro, but it was my wife's X-mas present and her choice. Rogue is known for quality, service and it's one of the best values out there.

    Concept2 BikeErg is also a great choice but uses no upper body. But C2 has some great interactive tools that you might enjoy.

    If you want a "spin style" bike, Keiser is the best, as others have said. But expensive.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,454 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    If you would like a fan style bike (with arm motion) we have a Rogue Echo bike. Built like a tank and lower cost than it's major competitors.

    If you're not going to take the bike on the road and will never care about "performance" biking (like training for road races), I would agree with this. Rogue Echo is affordable, works the entire body (has arms that move like an elliptical), is built incredibly well, is affordable (like $700) and will retain its value over time.

    It's an "Assault" style bike. The beauty about Assault Bikes is they are air driven (no motors to break) and are as hard as your fitness will allow. If you're newer to working out, they are fantastic. Once you're in shape, they will crush you. Intervals on Assault bikes are similar to intervals on rowers. Very, very hard -- but only if you want them to be.

    I train fanatically. I have Assault Bike (the AD Pro, very similar to the Rogue Echo). It whips my butt. But that's only because I'm trying to generate max Watts on it. My wife, who is 58, and the more casual exerciser, also loves it! Where I might burn 800 calories in an hour, she'll use the same bike and burn 350 or 400 on it. It appeals to all users too -- young and old. If I had my choice, I would have gotten the Rogue Echo over the AD Pro, but it was my wife's X-mas present and her choice. Rogue is known for quality, service and it's one of the best values out there.

    Concept2 BikeErg is also a great choice but uses no upper body. But C2 has some great interactive tools that you might enjoy.

    If you want a "spin style" bike, Keiser is the best, as others have said. But expensive.

    Agree. The "Assault/fan style" bike is the only piece of equipment you will see at the Crossfit games and in cardiac rehab units.

    One note on the Rogue Echo, it is heavy, about 150 pounds. Easy to move around due to wheels but hard to move up or down stairs when assembled.
  • EHollander89
    EHollander89 Posts: 169 Member
    Another positive review for the Rogue Echo bike! This bike is definitely sturdy. My husband and I both think it was a good investment for our home gym. You can set the bike for intervals, you can set a calorie target, time target, distance target, etc. Lots of great options.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,876 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    I rank "indoor bicycles" like this ...

    1) Smart trainer with real bicycle.
    2) Dumb trainer with real bicycle.
    3) Commercial grade spin bike.
    4) Other spin bike.
    5) Commercial grade stationary bike.
    6) Other stationary bike.
    7) Under desk thing.


    Also look into Zwift as a program to use with your "indoor bicycle" setup.

    Thanks...I think. Not sure what a smart trainer or dumb trainer are, but I don't really have the space for a "real bicycle" setup. Do you have a brand recommendation for spin bikes?

    If you have the space for an indoor bike, you have the space for a trainer and a real bike. The beauty of that is you mount the bike on the trainer when you want to ride indoors and then you can put it away. You can ride indoors when you need or want to and get out on the road and ride outside too. Looks like this...

    carousel.jpg

    Trainers come in either smart or analogue (dumb). With a smart trainer, you can connect to devices and use programs like Zwift.

    I do my indoor trainer cycling primarily in the winter when I can't make a spin class...but it gets pretty stinkin' boring so I'm glad to have an actual bike I can get outside on when the weather is nice.

  • ZenDream
    ZenDream Posts: 208 Member
    We have a Schwinn 230 recumbent bike.
  • ZenDream
    ZenDream Posts: 208 Member
    ZenDream wrote: »
    We have a Schwinn 230 recumbent bike.

    Schwinn 270 actually. We like it. Upgrade is in the distant future.