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PCOS / WEIGHTLOSS JOURNEY

PCOSWEIGHTLOSSGIRLPCOSWEIGHTLOSSGIRL Posts: 4Member Member Posts: 4Member Member
hey guys! Recently, just discovered I have PCOS. Seems like no matter how healthy I eat or workout I either stay at the same weight or fluctuate and gain two more pounds. Going to track my macros and test some things out to see what works.

Replies

  • serindipteserindipte Posts: 1,516Member Member Posts: 1,516Member Member
    Test a food scale, weigh and log all your food. "Eating healthy" isn't going to help you lose weight unless you're staying in a calorie deficit. Macros don't matter for weight loss.
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Posts: 1,904Member Member Posts: 1,904Member Member
    It might help you to join one or more of the PCOS related groups on here. I remembered there being at least1, I found 3 when I looked. I hope at least one of these will be supportive of you. Cllick on groups in the Community Bar, type the initials into the search groups box provided which should show you the three posibilities. I know you can read the front page of a group but I can't remember how far you can go without joining. By joining you can read old threads which might be helpful and ofcorse, start your own.

    Wishing you all the very best. PCOS symptoms are miserable.
  • savannahs21savannahs21 Posts: 250Member Member Posts: 250Member Member
    I have PCOS also. I stopped logging for a while but I'm restarting tomorrow! Feel free to add me.
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Posts: 1,904Member Member Posts: 1,904Member Member
    PCOS and Hypothyroidism, probably Hashimoto's, can have but not always have points of convergence within the symptoms someone with PCOS experiences. It may help some of you to have a full thyroid panel taken, not simply t4 and tsh which does not identify the possible underlying issues, a full thyroid panel would identify tsh, t4, t3 levels including reverse t3 which probably indicates a greater need for some minerals, its essential to test for antibodies too, indicative of autoimmunity. A high tsh with normal t4 is indicative of secondary hypothyroidism. Receiving apropriate treatment could reduce some if not all of the symptoms.

    Unfortunately there are medical professionals who are not permitted to do a full thyroid panel, (often country specific, as in UK) or have been trained to think tsh levels are enough of an indicater in itself. The thyroid gland reacts at the behest of other endocrine glands, insufficiency in one can put the thyroid system into insufficiency leading to a raft of possible symptoms not always the commonly accepted ones. One site quotes 300+. Mention of anything thyroid is often seen as an excuse but for many it can be a substantial reason for so many symptoms.

    Please do your own research, look into related medical papers, accredited doctors websites and more for better explanations than mine the subject is way too complicated to explain in a short post. Please educate yourselves because even now too many myths about female health still exist. (I'm in my 70's and I don't want any of you to have symptoms dismissed as I had, quality of life is way too prescious)
  • bmeadows380bmeadows380 Posts: 1,576Member Member Posts: 1,576Member Member
    Fuzzipeg wrote: »
    PCOS and Hypothyroidism, probably Hashimoto's, can have but not always have points of convergence within the symptoms someone with PCOS experiences. It may help some of you to have a full thyroid panel taken, not simply t4 and tsh which does not identify the possible underlying issues, a full thyroid panel would identify tsh, t4, t3 levels including reverse t3 which probably indicates a greater need for some minerals, its essential to test for antibodies too, indicative of autoimmunity. A high tsh with normal t4 is indicative of secondary hypothyroidism. Receiving apropriate treatment could reduce some if not all of the symptoms.

    Unfortunately there are medical professionals who are not permitted to do a full thyroid panel, (often country specific, as in UK) or have been trained to think tsh levels are enough of an indicater in itself. The thyroid gland reacts at the behest of other endocrine glands, insufficiency in one can put the thyroid system into insufficiency leading to a raft of possible symptoms not always the commonly accepted ones. One site quotes 300+. Mention of anything thyroid is often seen as an excuse but for many it can be a substantial reason for so many symptoms.

    Please do your own research, look into related medical papers, accredited doctors websites and more for better explanations than mine the subject is way too complicated to explain in a short post. Please educate yourselves because even now too many myths about female health still exist. (I'm in my 70's and I don't want any of you to have symptoms dismissed as I had, quality of life is way too prescious)

    @fuzzipeg Getting an endocrinologist to do a full thyroid panel can be a challenge! I was seeing one who was a teaching professor at a state university, and all she ever wanted to look at was TSH. I was still feeling hypothyroid symptoms even though we were keeping my TSH at rock bottom levels as my cancer followup. I could not get her to try any other testing, and finally talked to my GP who agreed to order the T4 and T3 tests. When those results came back showing me low on T3, I was at least able to get my endo to agree to put me on T3 supplementation as well. But I could not get her to do a reverse T3 test - she firmly believed that it didn't tell a doctor anything and that TSH was still the gold standard. :( I have since moved and my new endocrinologist at least didn't have any problems ordering the T3; jury is still out on getting the reverse done. I have never figured why its assumed that everyone's bodies will perfectly convert T4 to T3 with no trouble, and that good levels of TSH automatically mean that T4 and T3 levels are fine.
  • starbelliedsneedstarbelliedsneed Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
    I’m also experiencing PCOS symptoms and following! I’ve been trying to eat healthier since January, and exercise more, but it has been tough, particularly because I find my energy levels will shift suddenly.

    Hoping to find some community on here!
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Posts: 1,904Member Member Posts: 1,904Member Member
    @bmeadows380. I get your issues. For some there can be a genetic reason for lack of conversion for others its more a deficiency in other essential minerals sometimes vitamins too. its complicated. Testing of reverse t3 is essential because total t3 shows all the present t3 but not the active form. T3 is supposed to act similar to a three pin plug fitting all cells where its used, reverse t3 is a mirror image which does not ever become attached leaving a deficit sometimes a large one so the person is still hypo with all the debilitating symptoms.

    Tsh testing only shows, the body is asking for more t3 to be made. It does not show from where this signal is being sent nor the reason why its necessary. Knowing the t4 level only says, this amount should be made into t3, all things being equal. The system fails us by not finding out what is not working properly. Even the Doctor who initiated the testing system, gave an interview on BBC Woman's Hour many years ago, saying the way his testing system is being used now is not as he intended, it has been subverted.

    Its total madness the amount of active t3 not being measured because it is involved in so many other functions thyroid support sites explain it all well. Active t3 can help in preventing some cancers because it is involved in cell replacement, ensures a good copy. T3 is also involved in reproductive cycles. I can't remember the number of poorly copied cells it is said a body can produce in a day. An after thought, t3 is involved in digestion, transit etc, meaning t3 is involved in making the digestive enzymes from the pancreas principally ones involved in "sugar" regulation which is key to PCOS.

    Vitamin D can also help, latitude reduces the amount of sun we see and if your winter has been as dull and grey as ours its been far from helpful, not to mention as we age our ability to make it decreases.

    I am disappointed someone has disagreed with your post. I can only assume they are not as compromised as you and I, which is a great relief for them. Its sad when you have read round your own symptoms and scientifically know body reactions to be abandoned by less well read medics, its how I felt. To achieve the much better life I knew was possible I've had to follow the private path more functional path. Functional Medicine tends to keep up with the ever increasing Science. I think the worst thing I was ever told is, women are supposed to have pain associated with cycles! NO! When t3 is at a good level for that individual they should be pain free and totally well. I can't see how it benefits the species for women to be laid low month after month, have failed pregnancies and more.

    Stop the Thyroid Madness, site and book refers to the research which established the "normal range" of thyroid numbers. The remaining bloods in some hospital, which I can't remember, over a weekend were tested. The short coming of this research is by the time the testing took place there was no information on the donated blood status, did the person have known thyroid issues and were being treated? Did the person have family members who were under treatment leading to the question, is this person undiagnosed? Did the person have symptoms which could be caused by their possible thyroid status. The possible questions go on and on. There have been some beneficial changes in the range for tsh, in that the level is supposed to be closer to 0.5 I think, 2-0.5 rather than the 2-4 previously. Several Thyroid sites give lists of doctors who are supportive of women/people with thyroid related issues.

    Wishing you all the very best.
  • bmeadows380bmeadows380 Posts: 1,576Member Member Posts: 1,576Member Member
    Fuzzipeg wrote: »
    @bmeadows380. I get your issues. For some there can be a genetic reason for lack of conversion for others its more a deficiency in other essential minerals sometimes vitamins too. its complicated. Testing of reverse t3 is essential because total t3 shows all the present t3 but not the active form. T3 is supposed to act similar to a three pin plug fitting all cells where its used, reverse t3 is a mirror image which does not ever become attached leaving a deficit sometimes a large one so the person is still hypo with all the debilitating symptoms.

    Tsh testing only shows, the body is asking for more t3 to be made. It does not show from where this signal is being sent nor the reason why its necessary. Knowing the t4 level only says, this amount should be made into t3, all things being equal. The system fails us by not finding out what is not working properly. Even the Doctor who initiated the testing system, gave an interview on BBC Woman's Hour many years ago, saying the way his testing system is being used now is not as he intended, it has been subverted.

    Its total madness the amount of active t3 not being measured because it is involved in so many other functions thyroid support sites explain it all well. Active t3 can help in preventing some cancers because it is involved in cell replacement, ensures a good copy. T3 is also involved in reproductive cycles. I can't remember the number of poorly copied cells it is said a body can produce in a day. An after thought, t3 is involved in digestion, transit etc, meaning t3 is involved in making the digestive enzymes from the pancreas principally ones involved in "sugar" regulation which is key to PCOS.

    Vitamin D can also help, latitude reduces the amount of sun we see and if your winter has been as dull and grey as ours its been far from helpful, not to mention as we age our ability to make it decreases.

    I am disappointed someone has disagreed with your post. I can only assume they are not as compromised as you and I, which is a great relief for them. Its sad when you have read round your own symptoms and scientifically know body reactions to be abandoned by less well read medics, its how I felt. To achieve the much better life I knew was possible I've had to follow the private path more functional path. Functional Medicine tends to keep up with the ever increasing Science. I think the worst thing I was ever told is, women are supposed to have pain associated with cycles! NO! When t3 is at a good level for that individual they should be pain free and totally well. I can't see how it benefits the species for women to be laid low month after month, have failed pregnancies and more.

    Stop the Thyroid Madness, site and book refers to the research which established the "normal range" of thyroid numbers. The remaining bloods in some hospital, which I can't remember, over a weekend were tested. The short coming of this research is by the time the testing took place there was no information on the donated blood status, did the person have known thyroid issues and were being treated? Did the person have family members who were under treatment leading to the question, is this person undiagnosed? Did the person have symptoms which could be caused by their possible thyroid status. The possible questions go on and on. There have been some beneficial changes in the range for tsh, in that the level is supposed to be closer to 0.5 I think, 2-0.5 rather than the 2-4 previously. Several Thyroid sites give lists of doctors who are supportive of women/people with thyroid related issues.

    Wishing you all the very best.


    @Fuzzipeg Oh, I just find the disagree tag amusing. It wasn't on the post above where I was giving advice, it was on the post which was nothing more than personal experience! lol

    I just checked the last 2 bloodwork panels I had, and one listed the normal range as 0.45-4.5, while the other has 0.35-5. I suspect I'm one of those people who needs to be on the low, low end, because even when they had me down to 0.1, I didn't experience any of the typical too low symptoms. Back in December when it came in as 0.06, I was only experiencing very mild symptoms once in a while.

    What frustrates me is the number of general practioners who are still going by the old standards from 20 years ago! I'm in the States, but it's still a problem, here. For years I was told my thyroid levels were fine by my GP's who only looked at TSH and were using that old standard. I finally hit on one that was looking at the newer standards, and that one acknowledged that this was out of her league and sent me on to an endocrinologist. She and my current GP are the best two doctors I've ever dealt with because they actually listen and acknowledge when something isn't in their expertise!
  • PCOSWEIGHTLOSSGIRLPCOSWEIGHTLOSSGIRL Posts: 4Member Member Posts: 4Member Member
    Thank you all for your support, advice and suggestions. I’ve started using my scale again, and going to see an endo doctor. I’ve tried my OBGYN but she’s always pushing birth control pills on me and this time I am adamant on not taking them because I feel like they dismiss a lot of the inner issues of PCOS.

    I will add all of you x
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