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Beer-Only Diet?

lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,850Member Member Posts: 4,850Member Member
More for amusement than actual debate, since obviously not a good idea in a lot of ways, but we've talked about other crazy diet experiments:

https://blockclubchicago.org/2020/03/02/paddy-longs-owner-on-a-beer-only-fast-during-lent-and-hes-already-lost-18-pounds/

Replies

  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,850Member Member Posts: 4,850Member Member
    Not sure whether people will be able to access the article, so some excerpts, and also the man in question says that he is not recommending this fast to anyone else:

    "Can man survive on beer alone?

    Inspired by the 17th century Paulaner monks, bar owner Patrick Berger is giving up solid food and attempting a beer-only fast for Lent.

    On a slightly modified lenten schedule to accommodate a family vacation, Berger, a self-proclaimed beer geek and history buff, aims to forgo food for 40 days, surviving only on four beers a day, black coffee, water and vitamins.

    “I’ve known about the beer fast for 20-plus years. I’ve always been fascinated by it and thought, ‘oh that would be great, I’d love to try that someday,'” said Berger, who co-owns Paddy Long’s, 1028 W. Diversey Pkwy. in Lakeview, and Kaiser Tiger, 1415 W. Randolph St. in the West Loop....

    Berger reckoned it might even be a “good thing” for him to do, given his “extra pounds and whatnot.”

    Del Hall, director of sales at 50 West Brewing in Cincinnati, lost 44 pounds in 46 days on the beer-only fast....

    The hunger was hardest the first week, but grew easier to manage as the days stretched on, he said. The urge to eat hasn’t gone away entirely, especially because his job requires him to be surrounded by food....

    As of Saturday, Berger had lost 18 pounds in the 17 days he’s been on the fast, he said.

    “I literally feel like I’m breathing better and just lighter on my feet. I’ve noticed the fat that was pressing up against my rib cage is gone, and I’m sleeping better,” he said."
  • GaryRunsGaryRuns Posts: 347Member, Premium Member Posts: 347Member, Premium Member
    I have a couple of, late, redneck uncles who tried it. I have to admit, they were thin.
  • puffbratpuffbrat Posts: 2,789Member Member Posts: 2,789Member Member
    I guess the stimulant from the coffee could counteract the depressant effect of alcohol. Or you would have a super tipsy person twitching around.
  • mph323mph323 Posts: 3,458Member Member Posts: 3,458Member Member
    But...the beer the monks used had a different profile than modern beer and had at least a minimum amount of nutrition, I think. Correct me if I'm wrong I read an article a couple of weeks ago. Can you imagine what his kidneys and liver would be like after 40 days of straight alcohol?? Plus loss of muscle due to extreme weight loss? :o
  • kimny72kimny72 Posts: 14,878Member Member Posts: 14,878Member Member
    mph323 wrote: »
    But...the beer the monks used had a different profile than modern beer and had at least a minimum amount of nutrition, I think. Correct me if I'm wrong I read an article a couple of weeks ago. Can you imagine what his kidneys and liver would be like after 40 days of straight alcohol?? Plus loss of muscle due to extreme weight loss? :o

    Yeah, for this to not be an epic fail, you would need to pick a strong dense brew that as you said you are sure has some kind of nutrition, where the sustenance level compared to the alcohol level is quite different than the typical bottle of beer you can buy.

    The monks did it rather than the water fast they used to be required to during Lent, so it helped to somewhat protect their health I'd bet. For a modern man looking at it as a diet, ITA his liver, kidneys, and muscles will probably not be happy smh.

    From the OP link, just in case anyone is thinking this guy might be onto something:

    In a blog post, Berger is asked if there are health risks associated with the fast.

    “Probably,” he writes. “…I’m not an expert.”

    At his last doctor’s visit, Berger told his doctor he typically drinks a few beers each day.

    “She told me I needed to cut back, so I didn’t really feel encouraged to go to her with this diet,” he said. “I did not tell my doctor.’

    He hasn’t consulted her about this specific diet. He has an appointment to see his doctor next week, and he’s not sure how she’ll react.

    She can talk him out of it, he said, but she’ll have to bring the numbers.

    “It would have to be something from the blood and urine work that said, ‘you need to stop doing this,’” he said. “I have three kids and a wife and two businesses.”


    <sigh>
  • mph323mph323 Posts: 3,458Member Member Posts: 3,458Member Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    But...the beer the monks used had a different profile than modern beer and had at least a minimum amount of nutrition, I think. Correct me if I'm wrong I read an article a couple of weeks ago. Can you imagine what his kidneys and liver would be like after 40 days of straight alcohol?? Plus loss of muscle due to extreme weight loss? :o

    Yeah, for this to not be an epic fail, you would need to pick a strong dense brew that as you said you are sure has some kind of nutrition, where the sustenance level compared to the alcohol level is quite different than the typical bottle of beer you can buy.

    The monks did it rather than the water fast they used to be required to during Lent, so it helped to somewhat protect their health I'd bet. For a modern man looking at it as a diet, ITA his liver, kidneys, and muscles will probably not be happy smh.

    From the OP link, just in case anyone is thinking this guy might be onto something:

    In a blog post, Berger is asked if there are health risks associated with the fast.

    “Probably,” he writes. “…I’m not an expert.”

    At his last doctor’s visit, Berger told his doctor he typically drinks a few beers each day.

    “She told me I needed to cut back, so I didn’t really feel encouraged to go to her with this diet,” he said. “I did not tell my doctor.’

    He hasn’t consulted her about this specific diet. He has an appointment to see his doctor next week, and he’s not sure how she’ll react.

    She can talk him out of it, he said, but she’ll have to bring the numbers.

    “It would have to be something from the blood and urine work that said, ‘you need to stop doing this,’” he said. “I have three kids and a wife and two businesses.”


    <sigh>

    OMG, so if blood work doesn't show organ damage RIGHT NOW he's perfectly fine with long term damage?? I really hope no one is desperate enough to look at this guy and think "hmmm, fast weight loss, no giving up alchohol and no apparent damage "
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Posts: 1,319Member Member Posts: 1,319Member Member
    If I can add bratwurst, I'm in.
  • lokihenlokihen Posts: 200Member Member Posts: 200Member Member
    My husband had a friend who tried this. He stopped when uncontrollable diarrhea started running down his legs while at work.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 14,144Member Member Posts: 14,144Member Member
    Maybe a beer diet as a 5:2 strategy?

    (^^^ That's a joke, or at least meant to be. Mostly. :lol: )
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 7,029Member, Premium Member Posts: 7,029Member, Premium Member
    I don't think the beer is the problem. He is not replacing all of his food calories with beer calories if it is just 4 beers a day. That is a pretty low calorie diet. Hopefully the fact that it is only 40 days, if he doesn't end up eating all the foods one night before the end, will keep him from any permanent damage.

    Also, it is more of a publicity stunt than something to do for Lent.
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