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Bread or bread equivalent

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  • swirlybeeswirlybee Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member
    @mjbnj0001 what's your ww recipe. The crumb in your second pic looks fantastic!
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Member Posts: 9,118 Member Member Posts: 9,118 Member
    mjbnj0001 wrote: »
    ( @just_Tomek ) I copied a pic off FB today. Here's somebody that isn't at the extreme part of the spectrum of growing things indoors. There are folks with veritable farms in their homes via these units. Don't worry, this is my least message on this topic. It's a minor obsession now, LOL.

    z2jamm6n8lgx.png

    Jebus............ I wonder what they have in the other room lol ;)
  • mjbnj0001mjbnj0001 Member Posts: 906 Member Member Posts: 906 Member
    swirlybee wrote: »
    @mjbnj0001 what's your ww recipe. The crumb in your second pic looks fantastic!

    Thanks. Pretty simple: 3.5C flour (don't hate me, LOL, I'm a measurer, not a weigher), yeast, salt, water, plus additives, in this case, 2T honey, 2T vital wheat gluten. I (mostly) use a no-knead method, a fast approach, approx. 3 hrs from start to finished loaf. In this case, due to work I was doing in the house elsewhere, my first rise went 2hrs vs the usual 1.5hrs, and I had reduced the water from about 15oz to 14oz, per the posts above on hydration. Typically, my "whole wheat" over the past couple of years has been a mix of WW and bread flour or AP flour. With the Great 2020 Grocery Buying Panic, bread and AP flour got scarce, so I've been using 100% whole wheat, which was available to me, and experimenting with time, moisture and additives to get a loaf that isn't a "brick." The added gluten is one thing that helps, by the way. Oh, and mechanically, although I am doing "no knead," I've added some effort into the work by using something called a "spurtle" to more mix and draw the dough before first rise to help stimulate the gluten formation for improved crumb. The no-knead method also has an overnight version, which more better approximates a sourdough in flavor and crumb. Lastly, this WW dough is from Canada, part of a horde I bought while visiting my daughter in Ontario just as the border was getting ready to close. It is milled a little finer than WW here in the US.
  • swirlybeeswirlybee Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member
    Aha! Vital wheat gluten! Thanks for the recipe. I bought vital wheat gluten right when the "Great 2020 Grocery Buying Panic" (lol, love that term) started but I lucked out and randomly found bread flour at Target and have been finding it at odd locations. I haven't used the vital wheat gluten yet but that'll probably be the key to ww. I'm currently at 50/50 ww/bread flour and still playing around with hydration levels prior to jumping over to whole wheat.
  • mjbnj0001mjbnj0001 Member Posts: 906 Member Member Posts: 906 Member
    swirlybee wrote: »
    Aha! Vital wheat gluten! Thanks for the recipe. I bought vital wheat gluten right when the "Great 2020 Grocery Buying Panic" (lol, love that term) started but I lucked out and randomly found bread flour at Target and have been finding it at odd locations. I haven't used the vital wheat gluten yet but that'll probably be the key to ww. I'm currently at 50/50 ww/bread flour and still playing around with hydration levels prior to jumping over to whole wheat.

    Yep, the gluten helps. Oh, and I just re-read my post, I made a typo, it should say, "... this WW FLOUR is from Canada ...".

    50/50, 60/40, 40/60. I just got a shipment of 10lbs bread flour and 10lbs AP flour, so hopefully, we're over that hump for now. I've been focusing on basic breads and some other items, such as flatbreads (pita/naan-type and tortillas) and homemade burger rolls, that go with specific meals. My daughter has been perfecting her pizza dough for occasional weekend splurges. Now that I have a little flour supply, I think English muffins are next on the list. After a couple of months in lockdown, time for a little treat.

    Good luck, and Happy Baking!
  • swirlybeeswirlybee Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member
    Arrgh. Pizza dough has been thoroughly annoying me, specifically getting it from the table to the peel to the oven. I've resorted to using parchment paper but it's not getting the browning/charring that I want.
  • mjbnj0001mjbnj0001 Member Posts: 906 Member Member Posts: 906 Member
    swirlybee wrote: »
    Arrgh. Pizza dough has been thoroughly annoying me, specifically getting it from the table to the peel to the oven. I've resorted to using parchment paper but it's not getting the browning/charring that I want.

    My daughter is doing the "spread it in the sheet pan" method of pizza crust shaping. We don't have a pizza stone, but we're trying a trick from Alton Brown or somewhere using an inverted sheet pan under your cook pan as an ad hoc version of a stone. Not sure if we like the effect yet. Perhaps tomorrow will be Friday pizza night here ...
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Member Posts: 9,118 Member Member Posts: 9,118 Member
    swirlybee wrote: »
    Arrgh. Pizza dough has been thoroughly annoying me, specifically getting it from the table to the peel to the oven. I've resorted to using parchment paper but it's not getting the browning/charring that I want.
    mjbnj0001 wrote: »
    swirlybee wrote: »
    Arrgh. Pizza dough has been thoroughly annoying me, specifically getting it from the table to the peel to the oven. I've resorted to using parchment paper but it's not getting the browning/charring that I want.

    My daughter is doing the "spread it in the sheet pan" method of pizza crust shaping. We don't have a pizza stone, but we're trying a trick from Alton Brown or somewhere using an inverted sheet pan under your cook pan as an ad hoc version of a stone. Not sure if we like the effect yet. Perhaps tomorrow will be Friday pizza night here ...

    I have a friend who bought this. Its not cheap, but they have pizza couple times a week and he really perfected the dough. I never had a simple pizza margheritta like the ones he makes. I knot his is crazy $$$, for some, but if you think about it, it will pay for itself within a year or so.

    https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/breville-pizzaiolo/
  • swirlybeeswirlybee Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member
    just_Tomek wrote: »
    swirlybee wrote: »
    Arrgh. Pizza dough has been thoroughly annoying me, specifically getting it from the table to the peel to the oven. I've resorted to using parchment paper but it's not getting the browning/charring that I want.
    mjbnj0001 wrote: »
    swirlybee wrote: »
    Arrgh. Pizza dough has been thoroughly annoying me, specifically getting it from the table to the peel to the oven. I've resorted to using parchment paper but it's not getting the browning/charring that I want.

    My daughter is doing the "spread it in the sheet pan" method of pizza crust shaping. We don't have a pizza stone, but we're trying a trick from Alton Brown or somewhere using an inverted sheet pan under your cook pan as an ad hoc version of a stone. Not sure if we like the effect yet. Perhaps tomorrow will be Friday pizza night here ...

    I have a friend who bought this. Its not cheap, but they have pizza couple times a week and he really perfected the dough. I never had a simple pizza margheritta like the ones he makes. I knot his is crazy $$$, for some, but if you think about it, it will pay for itself within a year or so.

    https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/breville-pizzaiolo/

    For that kind of money, I'd rather get a new stove/oven. :smiley: We did buy an ooni 3. Much cheaper. We're still getting the hang of it, but like I said, my biggest problem is getting it from the table to the peel to the oven. I suspect that my problem is my dough, so I'll have to keep tweaking the recipe that I'm using and my technique.
  • mjbnj0001mjbnj0001 Member Posts: 906 Member Member Posts: 906 Member
    swirlybee wrote: »

    For that kind of money, I'd rather get a new stove/oven. :smiley: We did buy an ooni 3. Much cheaper. We're still getting the hang of it, but like I said, my biggest problem is getting it from the table to the peel to the oven. I suspect that my problem is my dough, so I'll have to keep tweaking the recipe that I'm using and my technique.

    We just got the new oven. Fortunately, before lockdown.

    Just did my first Aerogarden hydroponics maintenance. As a result, have some fresh basil (our first from this unit) for tonight's homemade pizza night. Did a taste test (of course!) on the basil - smells great, tastes great! Looking forward. And a 100% whole wheat honey whey loaf rising now. Busy kitchen today.

    3gpwhuw95239.jpg
  • lx1xlx1x Member Posts: 27,166 Member Member Posts: 27,166 Member
    swirlybee wrote: »
    For that kind of money, I'd rather get a new stove/oven. :smiley: We did buy an ooni 3. Much cheaper. We're still getting the hang of it, but like I said, my biggest problem is getting it from the table to the peel to the oven. I suspect that my problem is my dough, so I'll have to keep tweaking the recipe that I'm using and my technique.

    Did you use corn meal on the bottom of the dough or top of peel? If not.. plenty of flour..

    I typically use the of the pizza pan as my peel (inverted)..

    Crisp crust.. use a stone or cast iron.. it has to be over 500°f to get that burn/crispy crust..

    x1xbd6kx4nkm.jpg



    edited June 5
  • mjbnj0001mjbnj0001 Member Posts: 906 Member Member Posts: 906 Member
    So @swirlybee and @just_Tomek , it's been a busy bready day in the house today. Pizza night (pic enclosed), my daughter's creation (using the basil from our hydroponics), a fresh loaf of honey whole wheat whey bread (100% whole wheat and a little gluten, as before), and a midnight surprise: scones. Since we have a decent flour supply on-hand, after 79 days, we thought it was time for a treat. I thought English muffins, my wife jumped up, "scones, please!" So, "happy wife, happy life," and someone is getting a surprise for breakfast (it's 12:20AM here now).

    I tried a new trick with the whole wheat. I've been brushing a bit of water on top since earlier this spring with the thought that it would help create crust. But I've also been thinking lately that some of that excess water must be seeping down into the loaf pan, making the bottom of the loaf wetter and denser throughout the bake. So tonight, I tried the French trick - I put a pan of water in the oven alongside the bread to add a little steam (this is some of the same effect a closed loaf pan [e.g., Pullman] or Dutch Oven has to give a good crust). Result seen below. One data point does not a theory prove, but it is encouraging. The loaf itself is nice and soft.

    af7bv9151nh7.jpg

    y53fne5ejui6.jpg

    tzjns55fgx0l.jpg

  • swirlybeeswirlybee Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member
    I endorse the water pan method. I've done a back-to-back comparison of water pan vs. no water pan and the results are definitely noticeable. Make sure you take out the water pan around the half way point, otherwise the loaf might get too fluffy/loose. That's what happened with my last 100% ww loaf.

    I did a sourdough pizza yesterday. Did not work out at all. During the rise, I just cover the dough with an inverted sheet pan and the hubby must've moved it enough that the top of the dough dried up and hardened. Then, because it was windy outside, the pizza oven was being super finicky. One thing that worked out though is that I've gotten the hang of getting the dough to the peel and into the oven. I've use cornmeal before but thanks to @lx1x whose suggestion made using a lot more cornmeal than I was previously using.
  • lx1xlx1x Member Posts: 27,166 Member Member Posts: 27,166 Member
    swirlybee wrote: »
    I endorse the water pan method. I've done a back-to-back comparison of water pan vs. no water pan and the results are definitely noticeable. Make sure you take out the water pan around the half way point, otherwise the loaf might get too fluffy/loose. That's what happened with my last 100% ww loaf.

    I did a sourdough pizza yesterday. Did not work out at all. During the rise, I just cover the dough with an inverted sheet pan and the hubby must've moved it enough that the top of the dough dried up and hardened. Then, because it was windy outside, the pizza oven was being super finicky. One thing that worked out though is that I've gotten the hang of getting the dough to the peel and into the oven. I've use cornmeal before but thanks to @lx1x whose suggestion made using a lot more cornmeal than I was previously using.

    👍

    Yeah.. depending how sticky the dough is.. I do test slide before adding the topping etc. It's all trial and error tbh.
  • swirlybeeswirlybee Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member Member, Premium Posts: 463 Member
    back to the original thread topic. Here's my recipe for low calorie croissant which is only 75 calories per serving.

    dough
    4.3 g water, warm
    0.2 g yeast
    8 g all purpose flour
    1 g sugar
    0.2 g salt
    0.8 g egg yolk
    5.2 g unsalted butter

    Mix together all ingredients, reserving 4.5 grams of the butter. Knead using the slap and fold method for about 30 seconds. Cover and refrigerate for 10 minutes. Stretch and fold all corners of the dough a total of 3 times, refrigerating for 10 minutes between each stretch and fold. Make butter block with remaining butter. Laminate. Bake at 375F for 18-20 minutes.

    And now I present you with the 75 calorie croissant.
    dtdviwfdtw09.jpg


  • rhaiinrhaiin Member Posts: 704 Member Member Posts: 704 Member
    If you're only worried about the calories consumption and not the ingredients, Nickels (35 cal), Sara Lee (45 cal) and Aldi (35 cal) have low calorie breads that taste pretty good. I'm sure there are some weird ingredients in them to make them so low calorie, but I don't worry about that.

    Some people like making cloud bread, but I wasn't a fan.

    I use low-carb tortillas & Wasa Crackers as bread replacements.
  • mjbnj0001mjbnj0001 Member Posts: 906 Member Member Posts: 906 Member
    Tonight's loaf: simple bread - flour (100% unbleached bread flour), water, salt, yeast - and about 6oz plain 2% greek yogurt. Using the water pan method once again, got a nice top crust. Delicious.

    36g9q2qf354u.jpg
  • mjbnj0001mjbnj0001 Member Posts: 906 Member Member Posts: 906 Member
    The interior of the above loaf during today's breakfast. Softer, fluffier bread with an artisinal tang and crispy top crust (produced via the water-pan-in-the-stove method). I doubt this one will last 2 days with the fam. That's both good and bad, LOL.

    ifvc5ry5mywh.jpg
  • Catlessi41Catlessi41 Member Posts: 16 Member Member Posts: 16 Member
    You can try Scandinavian Wasa bread\crackers. In the US they are usually found by cookies and crackers. Use them like bread. :wink:
    edited June 13
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Member Posts: 9,118 Member Member Posts: 9,118 Member
    meowsana wrote: »
    You can try Scandinavian Wasa bread\crackers. In the US they are usually found by cookies and crackers. Use them like bread. :wink:

    Why? You like cardboard?
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