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Bike recommendations?

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  • JthanmyfitnesspalJthanmyfitnesspal Member, Premium Posts: 2,412 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,412 Member
    @NorthCascades put out the bikesdirect web site, and the prices there are impressively low. But, all you get is a off-brand bike that you have to assemble and adjust it yourself. And, Presumably, this is an off-shore company, so if something goes wrong, who are you going to complain to? This can work for people who are quite mechanically capable, but remember that your safety and perhaps life are at stake.

    Why not spend a little more and get something that will last for a long time? If you don't know what you will like, do some demos/rentals and try out a few styles on a longer ride. The main thing is to give the shop their due. A good relationship with a good shop is worth every penny.

    Here's my history: I bought a Garry Fisher MTB in the 90s for something like $1K. I have ridden it to death and am on my second set of wheels. I just broke a spoke, in fact. Although it is really old, I could actually resurrect it if I wanted to, but it is finally so far behind the technology curve that it really isn't worth it. I also bought a racing bike in the 90s for something around $1K that is now sitting in my basement as it has been replaced in the last few years. I'm thinking of turning the old one into an indoor training bike with Zwift. So, getting a bike you like for $1K could give you something you rode for 20 years or more. That makes it sound pretty cheap!
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 9,814 Member Member Posts: 9,814 Member
    Oh man. Sorry to hear it. Live and learn.

    Thanks. This was 2 or 3 years ago, and now that I think more about it, it may have been this part:

    a1apn3wzfydd.jpg

    But anyway, I called the manufacturer of the bike, Schwinn, and they said a new wheel would be $75, which was almost the cost of the entire bike 🤦🏻‍♂️. I put the bike into storage for a long time, and threw the damaged wheel away, thinking the entire thing was useless. Only a couple months ago I went into a bike shop and discovered these parts could have been replaced for relatively cheap with having to discard the whole wheel 🤦🏻‍♂️. You're absolutely right - live and learn.

    I bought a Trek FX3 with rim brakes I think close to a year ago. $700 isn't cheap, but I don't regret a penny of this purchase, for a single second. This frame is so light, especially compared to the Schwinn. I had no idea riding a bicycle can be such a joy until I got on the FX3 😁

    If it makes you feel better, I'm pretty sure you'd need to have the hub rebuilt to replace that part. Which might (?) involve taking the wheel apart (ie removing the spokes to gain access to the hub) and then putting it back together. It might well be that the labor would have cost more than a replacement wheel.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 9,814 Member Member Posts: 9,814 Member
    @NorthCascades put out the bikesdirect web site, and the prices there are impressively low. But, all you get is a off-brand bike that you have to assemble and adjust it yourself. And, Presumably, this is an off-shore company, so if something goes wrong, who are you going to complain to? This can work for people who are quite mechanically capable, but remember that your safety and perhaps life are at stake.

    Why not spend a little more and get something that will last for a long time? If you don't know what you will like, do some demos/rentals and try out a few styles on a longer ride. The main thing is to give the shop their due. A good relationship with a good shop is worth every penny.

    Here's my history: I bought a Garry Fisher MTB in the 90s for something like $1K. I have ridden it to death and am on my second set of wheels. I just broke a spoke, in fact. Although it is really old, I could actually resurrect it if I wanted to, but it is finally so far behind the technology curve that it really isn't worth it. I also bought a racing bike in the 90s for something around $1K that is now sitting in my basement as it has been replaced in the last few years. I'm thinking of turning the old one into an indoor training bike with Zwift. So, getting a bike you like for $1K could give you something you rode for 20 years or more. That makes it sound pretty cheap!

    Bikes direct sells bikes that didn't sell elsewhere. Maybe that's because it just didn't sell, maybe it's because there's something wrong with it. I read about somebody who bought a bike from them, it arrived with a bent chainring. BD was reluctant to accept it back. This is why I cautioned against them. But if somebody has a $400 budget ... that's hard to hit with a quality bike.

    About your broken spoke, my rule has been if one breaks replace the spoke, if another brakes replace the wheel.
  • Grace_spaceshipGrace_spaceship Member Posts: 55 Member Member Posts: 55 Member
    All I would say is go to a local bike shop and see what they've got. Even if none of them are right for you you can get a better idea of what you want. Also when you get it think about going in to get it fitted properly. Proper seat height and stem length can make a huge difference to how comfortable a bike it
  • BrianSharpeBrianSharpe Member Posts: 9,020 Member Member Posts: 9,020 Member
    Keep in mind that there's a difference between price and value. When I started riding consistently again I picked up a relatively inexpensive Marin aluminum framed hybrid (which has been passed down to other family members) but quickly found it wasn't what I wanted (I'd grown up on road bikes) and within a year had bought an entry level Giant road bike which, with a few modifications, I still use for both racing (triathlons) and commuting. Giant is the biggest frame maker in the world and they offer a wide variety of frame geometries and price points. Agree with the earlier suggestions about visiting your LBS and try a number of bikes, once you've found one that you love it's also worth getting a really good fit done for both mechanical efficiency and comfort.
  • ahimes39ahimes39 Member Posts: 103 Member Member Posts: 103 Member
    I visited my LBS yesterday and really enjoyed talking with the staff. They were friendly and helpful, but here's the thing: bikes in the $500 price range (I decided that was my upward limit) won't be available until August. The manager said he's got a lot on back order but that bikes are just scarce right now. He's also on the lookout for a good used bike for me, men's or women's (they do consignments sometimes). Anyway, I've been thinking about getting a bike for the last two years, so what's two more months, eh?
  • mjbnj0001mjbnj0001 Member Posts: 926 Member Member Posts: 926 Member
    ahimes39 wrote: »
    I visited my LBS yesterday and really enjoyed talking with the staff. They were friendly and helpful, but here's the thing: bikes in the $500 price range (I decided that was my upward limit) won't be available until August. The manager said he's got a lot on back order but that bikes are just scarce right now. He's also on the lookout for a good used bike for me, men's or women's (they do consignments sometimes). Anyway, I've been thinking about getting a bike for the last two years, so what's two more months, eh?

    two months is a great ramp-up time for building/maintaining some baseline fitness to be more ready for your bike. depending on where you are, autumn is a great time - perhaps the best - for riding. i got back on a bike decades after last being an active cyclist, by being inspired by my daughter. however, i had a med issue and was flat on my back for several months. i had the bug to ride, so i fed it with voracious youtube watching from the bed: destinations, bike type details, maintenance techniques, and more. i created a happy biking monster out of myself, so when i was able to be up and out, i took off.
  • moonangel12moonangel12 Member, Premium Posts: 741 Member Member, Premium Posts: 741 Member
    mjbnj0001 wrote: »
    ahimes39 wrote: »
    I visited my LBS yesterday and really enjoyed talking with the staff. They were friendly and helpful, but here's the thing: bikes in the $500 price range (I decided that was my upward limit) won't be available until August. The manager said he's got a lot on back order but that bikes are just scarce right now. He's also on the lookout for a good used bike for me, men's or women's (they do consignments sometimes). Anyway, I've been thinking about getting a bike for the last two years, so what's two more months, eh?

    two months is a great ramp-up time for building/maintaining some baseline fitness to be more ready for your bike. depending on where you are, autumn is a great time - perhaps the best - for riding. i got back on a bike decades after last being an active cyclist, by being inspired by my daughter. however, i had a med issue and was flat on my back for several months. i had the bug to ride, so i fed it with voracious youtube watching from the bed: destinations, bike type details, maintenance techniques, and more. i created a happy biking monster out of myself, so when i was able to be up and out, i took off.
    I have taken to YouTube as well - bike maintenance, gear upgrades, etc. Now I can sew/quilt and “bike” at the same time! Ha!
  • MotorsheenMotorsheen Member Posts: 17,327 Member Member Posts: 17,327 Member
    Buy the most expensive mountain bike you can afford and then switch out the knobby tires for road tires.

    Go with pedals that are flat on one side and SPD on the other.

    Also... helmet, gloves, shorts, eyewear and shoes.

    just my two cents
  • heybalesheybales Member Posts: 17,784 Member Member Posts: 17,784 Member
    Also - a decent amount spent up front can last a long time. Can be a great return on investment if you are careful up front picking one.
    And careful with it later.

    Find a series where the only difference is the components but the frame stays the same - you can upgrade the components later when needed or desired.

    2000 model, $1000 USD at that time.
    Even with equal swapouts of the 105 drivetrain a couple times, and couple upgrades, new wheels (I built so tad cheaper) - probably still only $100 / year average at max.

    pnl7n9ymguk4.jpg


  • MotorsheenMotorsheen Member Posts: 17,327 Member Member Posts: 17,327 Member
    heybales wrote: »
    Also - a decent amount spent up front can last a long time. Can be a great return on investment if you are careful up front picking one.
    And careful with it later.

    Find a series where the only difference is the components but the frame stays the same - you can upgrade the components later when needed or desired.

    2000 model, $1000 USD at that time.
    Even with equal swapouts of the 105 drivetrain a couple times, and couple upgrades, new wheels (I built so tad cheaper) - probably still only $100 / year average at max.

    pnl7n9ymguk4.jpg


    Awesomeness .....

    A new bike is more fun than a new girlfriend, it damn sure is.
  • ahimes39ahimes39 Member Posts: 103 Member Member Posts: 103 Member
    heybales wrote: »
    Also - a decent amount spent up front can last a long time. Can be a great return on investment if you are careful up front picking one.
    And careful with it later.

    Find a series where the only difference is the components but the frame stays the same - you can upgrade the components later when needed or desired.

    pnl7n9ymguk4.jpg


    Thanks--I'll ask around at the bike shop. It looked like Bontranger was a major brand they carried--does anyone know if more expensive parts can be switched out for the cheaper ones on a Bontranger bike frame? That may be a really dumb question. I need to watch youtube videos to learn more.
  • ahimes39ahimes39 Member Posts: 103 Member Member Posts: 103 Member

    [/quote]

    Awesomeness .....

    A new bike is more fun than a new girlfriend, it damn sure is.[/quote]

    I will have to take your word on that. ;)
  • heybalesheybales Member Posts: 17,784 Member Member Posts: 17,784 Member
    ahimes39 wrote: »
    heybales wrote: »
    Also - a decent amount spent up front can last a long time. Can be a great return on investment if you are careful up front picking one.
    And careful with it later.

    Find a series where the only difference is the components but the frame stays the same - you can upgrade the components later when needed or desired.

    pnl7n9ymguk4.jpg


    Thanks--I'll ask around at the bike shop. It looked like Bontranger was a major brand they carried--does anyone know if more expensive parts can be switched out for the cheaper ones on a Bontranger bike frame? That may be a really dumb question. I need to watch youtube videos to learn more.

    Wasn't aware of a Bontrager bike frame.
    Can't find reference to one either.
    The are Trek owned arm that makes accessories - so I'm sure the name was all over a Trek bike frame to some degree. Tires, rims, stem, handlebars, seat, post, pedals, maybe even crank or derailers.

    But not dumb question - some really cheap components could use sizes or methods that the nicer stuff later can't replace.
    I've not seen that on Bontrager components though, usually it's a mix of theirs and Shimano in some manner.

    That's why a model series is a safe bet - same frame already with cheap to expensive components on it.

    Going off assumption your store carries Trek then, there is for instance a whole series under fitness hybrid category that starts at FX 1 disc @ $550 list, to a FX Sport 6 @ $2100 - same frame design (though material may be different weights or sizes available) and of course very different components.
    The cheaper bikes may come in only 3 sizes, the more expensive more options. If you fit correctly on the cheaper, components can be upgraded later as needed.

    Just an example of what I mean.
  • pridesabtchpridesabtch Member Posts: 742 Member Member Posts: 742 Member
    My husband is just starting to ride (cross training for running), and rather than go out and drop serious cash on a cyclocross bike, I set up a bike that can do road and gravel.

    I got a used Cannondale (I also like Trek & Specialize) road bike with a carbon fork ($300). Put a wider slightly rougher road tire ($150/set). The super skinny slick tires aren't necessary for what you are looking at. They are more for speed and aren't good in weather. I tend to be I prefer the hard small saddles for comfort. The fewer contact points you have the few places there are to hurt. You want the back width of the seat to fit your sit bones. A compact double seems to be the drive train of choice among roadies and gravel folks.

    The best place to find a used bike, if you can't find any from your LBS, is to go to your local bike club. You can usually join a Facebook Page where these would be posted. These guys upgrade frequently and sell off their older bikes. You do however want to make sure the bike fits. Being the same height as the seller helps, but bodies are different and you need to try it.

    "Serious" Bikers were once new bikers and are interested in furthering the love of riding on any platform. Join a club, and you will learn more than you ever thought about biking.

    Best of luck!

  • rickhudson4rickhudson4 Member Posts: 1 Member Member Posts: 1 Member
    I mainly ride with mountain bike which has fat tires like a big mongoose. They are the best fit for me and put me in an easy comfort manner.

    I highly recommend putting the right weight match and then selecting the bike for yourself. You may look for bikes quest and select the best one for you.
  • lorrpblorrpb Member Posts: 11,196 Member Member Posts: 11,196 Member
    Check out a local triathlon or cycling club. There are always people selling their older less used bikes to get $ to buy a new bike. You would want to ask for a hybrid Or commuter style
  • dmcforthewindmcforthewin Member Posts: 119 Member Member Posts: 119 Member
    Hello, I know your post is a little older, but I saw you own a sixthreezero bike cruiser. Can I ask u a few questions?

    Did you buy in your local area or long distance? I have never purchase a bike far away from home.
    Do you have a single speed or multiple speeds? Can't remember if it's called gears or speeds) Lol
    Do you just use it for leisurly strolling or for a more fast paced exercise rountine?
    How often do you use your cruiser and how long?
    Would you recommend a cruiser and what minimal speed for biking at a moderate pace around the neighborhood or community park paved paths would you recommend?
    Do you think it is a comfortable type bike choice, for riding between 45-60 min 5 days a week? I wasn't sure because of the seat type.
    Would you recommend SixThreeZero for bikes?

    I'm so sorry for all the questions. I just saw the company u own your bike from. I have been going over that same company for a couple days now. I am trying to figure out what bike and the same company u bought your bike from recommended the EVRYjourney 3 or 7 speed over a 1 speed cruiser because of me wanting to ride a a little more fast pace. I am so confused if a cruiser will be ok though (any speed). I hope you can help me with your opinions on your own cruiser bike experience. Thanks so much!
    I have a SixThreeZero "Around the Block". It's a beach cruiser and I love it!

    https://www.sixthreezero.com/

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