Calorie Counter

Message Boards General Health, Fitness and Diet
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Need help setting goals for Grams of Sugar and % of Carbs

papaj1958papaj1958 Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member
How many grams of sugar for a 2300 calorie diet? I can find information on "added sugar" but that doesn't help me with logging my foods in the application. My glucose is a "little high" and my doctor told me to reduce my sugar and carbs. I'm guessing 70 grams of sugar and 40% carbs. Both are a wild guess. Input would be greatly appreciated!

Replies

  • cmriversidecmriverside Member Posts: 30,212 Member Member Posts: 30,212 Member
    That sounds reasonable.

    40C 30P 30F is a good common-sense macro split.

    The added sugars recommendation from the WHO is under 10% of your calories.
  • papaj1958papaj1958 Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member
    My problem is that MyFitnessPal food diary doesn't seem to allow logging "added sugars." Unless I'm misunderstanding. If I eat a banana it has sugar, but that isn't considered "added sugar." If I drink a soda that has tons of added sugar they both get calculated the same in the diary. Or, am I misunderstanding? Thanks for insights.
  • cmriversidecmriverside Member Posts: 30,212 Member Member Posts: 30,212 Member
    No, you're correct. Added sugars are lumped in with the natural sugars.

    You'll just need to do a little bit of math in your head.
  • HeidiCooksSupperHeidiCooksSupper Member, Premium Posts: 3,653 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,653 Member
    It's very difficult to calculate grams of "added sugars" using MFP since most of the entries in the database do not and cannot distinguish between natural and "added" sugars. Milk, for instance has lactose, among other things, which is a sugar. Fruits contain sugars. Even a stalk of celery has 0.4 grams of sugar. If you keep your carb intake to 40% of your calories and aim toward eating whole grains, vegetables, and whole fruits as your prime sources of carbohydrates, you are likely to be keeping your "sugar" numbers within reason.

    Not to put words in the mouth of a physician but when she said "sugar" she probably meant added sugars in things like soda, cake icing, etc., not milk, grains, and vegetables.
  • papaj1958papaj1958 Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member
    Thanks to all!
  • stargirlhorsestargirlhorse Member Posts: 45 Member Member Posts: 45 Member
    No, you're correct. Added sugars are lumped in with the natural sugars.

    You'll just need to do a little bit of math in your head.

    Wish this could be changed lol. I usually add up my fruits of the day and subtract from total sugar and just assume the rest is added.
  • ALZ14ALZ14 Member Posts: 41 Member Member Posts: 41 Member
    If this is for blood sugar management you need to pay attention to goal carb count, not just sugar. ALL carbs (bread, potatoes, cake, candy, fruit, etc) raise your blood sugar. Pairing your carbs with protein helps your body process the carbs better and taking even a short walk after eating helps even more.

    Depending on what “a little high” means you may just need to cut back a little on the simple carbs (white bread, white rice, sugar) or it may mean you need to cut way back. Unfortunately without a blood glucose meter you won’t know for sure if what you are doing is working.

    You can get a fairly cheap glucose meter and supplies over the counter at the pharmacy and most big box stores.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 22,088 Member Member Posts: 22,088 Member
    No, you're correct. Added sugars are lumped in with the natural sugars.

    You'll just need to do a little bit of math in your head.

    Wish this could be changed lol. I usually add up my fruits of the day and subtract from total sugar and just assume the rest is added.

    Vegetables and dairy have sugar too.

    When I've challenged myself to stay at or under 5% of my calories from added sugar I looked at labels and did the math in a spreadsheet.
  • papaj1958papaj1958 Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member
    ALZ14 wrote: »

    Depending on what “a little high” means you may just need to cut back a little on the simple carbs (white bread, white rice, sugar) or it may mean you need to cut way back. Unfortunately without a blood glucose meter you won’t know for sure if what you are doing is working.
    .

    104...so, not horrible, but it has been hovering around that number for the last couple of years.
    edited August 3
  • papaj1958papaj1958 Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member
    Thanks everyone! I appreciate the input.
    edited August 3
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 5,574 Member Member Posts: 5,574 Member
    No, you're correct. Added sugars are lumped in with the natural sugars.

    You'll just need to do a little bit of math in your head.

    Wish this could be changed lol. I usually add up my fruits of the day and subtract from total sugar and just assume the rest is added.

    You can actually get a decent amount of sugar from dairy and veg too. When I logged, I just looked at the source of the sugar and could usually tell pretty easily (but then I do eat mostly whole foods). Packaging in the US should now have the amount of added sugar broken out too.
  • ALZ14ALZ14 Member Posts: 41 Member Member Posts: 41 Member
    papaj1958 wrote: »
    ALZ14 wrote: »
    104...so, not horrible, but it has been hovering around that number for the last couple of years.

    Is that your morning fasting level? Random test at a doctor’s appointment?

    If it is fasting, that isn’t too bad, but something to keep an eye on. Fasting is the hardest to control by diet alone from my experience with Gestational Diabetes (which is a different beast than Type I or II).

    Lowering your intake of simple carbs, increasing protein, some exercise and weight loss should help it a lot. Good luck!
Sign In or Register to comment.