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Protein

JondurredJondurred Member Posts: 5 Member Member Posts: 5 Member
Hi all,

I have been following general guidance and MyFitnessPal recommendations for a protein intake of 90 grams for an adult male. However, most weightlifting sites recommend 1 gram per pound of body weight, which for me is approx 200 grams of protein a day. This seems like a lot! Especially as I am vegetarian so can’t just throw another chicken breast in!

So my questions for the illuminati:

- do you follow the 1g per pound guidance?
- Do you keep to it on non training days?
- any guidance on how much protein should come from real food vs protein shakes?
- Any veggie-friendly tips to up protein intake?

Background stuff in case it helps: age 41; gym 3/4 times a week following a rough shoulders, back and biceps, chest and triceps, legs programme (each is a separate day); run roughly 30 miles a week; aims are to gain strength and muscle but without having to cut down on the running.

Thanks in advance

Replies

  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Member Posts: 27,122 Member Member Posts: 27,122 Member
    One gram per pound of LEAN BODY MASS, which is different than body weight.
    Jondurred wrote: »

    So my questions for the illuminati:

    - do you follow the 1g per pound guidance? Depends on your goals. I'm a powerlifter and shoot for the 1 g per lb of bodyweight. But you don't necessarily need that much. Honestly, based on the information given, probably 150 grams a day is a good target.
    - Do you keep to it on non training days? Yes.
    - any guidance on how much protein should come from real food vs protein shakes?Totally personal preference.
    It's protein either way, but you'll get more other micronutrients if it's from real food.

    - Any veggie-friendly tips to up protein intake? Sorry, I love a good steak. ;)



  • oliverwncoliverwnc Member Posts: 62 Member Member Posts: 62 Member
    Hello!

    Happy to answer, and hope this helps:
    - Yes, I do aim for 1g/lb. That way falling a little short is OK.
    - Yes, always keep macros consistent whatever the day.
    - Protein shakes are food...! The only question here is whether you need something that fills you up a bit more rather than just drinking your calories.
    - I'm veggie (mostly) and it isn't easy. Yoghurt. Egg whites. Protein powders are a help! Low-fat cheese. Beans.

    Agreed on 1g/lb going by Lean Body Mass. For your training volume, though, I'd say the higher end is better.
  • JondurredJondurred Member Posts: 5 Member Member Posts: 5 Member
    Thank you both! I hadn’t considered lean body mass and there is a fair amount of me that is not lean! While I am attempting to build some muscle, I am trying not to think about fat. I was almost thinking do an initial training cycle of 6 weeks (to take advantage of beginner gains) and then cut calories back a bit for a mini cut. Whaddya reckon? Good idea?

    Now all I have to do is get about 90g of protein in my evening meal! There’s only so many omelettes I can eat!
  • claireychn074claireychn074 Member, Premium Posts: 359 Member Member, Premium Posts: 359 Member
    After playing with my macros I actually aim for a bit over 1g per 1lb. I am c 121 pounds and I aim for 130g but don’t always hit it. I personally find that a higher protein diet makes me feel better and reduces my doms. Maybe just a coincidence but I seem to have worse doms on lower protein days. Good veggie sources include dairy like Greek yoghurt (if you’re happy to have milk), lower fat cheese and cottage cheese. I eat meat but I also eat a fair amount of pulses, and I probably supplement with a shake 3 times a week. It’s a high protein diet for my age and size but it works for me and my hobby!
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,579 Member Member Posts: 8,579 Member
    Many variables to access if we are concerned about protien intake.

    Current evidence is showing more and more that we "could" benefit more consuming higher amounts of protien.

    Some of the variables are...
    1. How male you are
    2. How sensitive you are to MPS
    3. Age(we need more)
    4. Health conditions e.g., autoimmune disease, digestive health, etc
    5. Quality of protien(Leucine per meal)
    6. Eating in a deficit(more) or bulking(less)

    So being a vegetarian you can experience MPS just as much as a carnivores person with the same attributes/conditions as long as we have adequate leucine amounts other EAAs.

    My recommendations for protein are 1.6-3.1g/kg/day, which encompasses the protein recommendations in TBAB. Try to consume 3g of leucine per meal.

    edited August 28
  • JondurredJondurred Member Posts: 5 Member Member Posts: 5 Member
    Thanks! Some more stuff for me to google!

    It looks like I need to rethink my runners diet (carbs!) and do my cooking with a calculator.
  • oliverwncoliverwnc Member Posts: 62 Member Member Posts: 62 Member
    Jondurred wrote: »
    Thank you both! I hadn’t considered lean body mass and there is a fair amount of me that is not lean! While I am attempting to build some muscle, I am trying not to think about fat. I was almost thinking do an initial training cycle of 6 weeks (to take advantage of beginner gains) and then cut calories back a bit for a mini cut. Whaddya reckon? Good idea?

    Now all I have to do is get about 90g of protein in my evening meal! There’s only so many omelettes I can eat!

    I wouldn't overthink it or stress about it too much. If you're exercising, hitting a reasonable number of calories and your protein is in the right range then you'll certainly get the results. We're talking about the final 2-3% to reach perfection!

    On these questions, I think the idea of strength gains for 6 weeks and then a cut would be fine but not entirely necessary. It might prolong your dieting phase. If you think beginner gains are a realistic prospect, you'll get those on maintenance calories or a 100-200kcal surplus. I'd keep it that low so you avoid gaining too much fat - which, ultimately, you're going to have to spend time losing.
  • JondurredJondurred Member Posts: 5 Member Member Posts: 5 Member
    oliverwnc wrote: »

    I wouldn't overthink it or stress about it too much. If you're exercising, hitting a reasonable number of calories and your protein is in the right range then you'll certainly get the results. We're talking about the final 2-3% to reach perfection!

    On these questions, I think the idea of strength gains for 6 weeks and then a cut would be fine but not entirely necessary. It might prolong your dieting phase. If you think beginner gains are a realistic prospect, you'll get those on maintenance calories or a 100-200kcal surplus. I'd keep it that low so you avoid gaining too much fat - which, ultimately, you're going to have to spend time losing.

    Thanks again! It’s been surprisingly easy to up the protein for the last few days, it just takes a bit more thought in advance for meals rather than just eating to a calorie target. As you suggest I am going to stick to maintenance calories (about 2200) for a bit and see how I do and then maybe increase or decrease depending on whether I still feel like a fat bloater or am not,

    @Chieflrg ‘s point about leucine is an interesting one. It may be that the protein shake will be sufficient for that. I will do some more research.
  • gabrielcurran2243gabrielcurran2243 Member Posts: 20 Member Member Posts: 20 Member
    Most days my protein intake is 1.3gpp or higher. But I’m a carnivore
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