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How long does it take for a petite woman to gain muscle and build her glutes?

kontehhalimakontehhalima Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
So I'm working on building my glutes so it can look bigger and rounder and to overall get my body to look more proportionate. During quarantine i was able to lose weight and reach the goal of getting my waist to 26in by the end of summer (it was about 29/30in in the beginning of the year). But because I lost weight my butt also went down from 37in to 35in. Now that gyms have reopened I am going to the gym and using weights to work my glutes. I am also changing my diet from a deficit to a surplus and attempting to eat enough proteins and calories to be able to build that muscle. Assuming that im doing everything correctly as in im using the right form, working on the right muscles, eating enough protein and calories, etc how long will it take for my glutes to get bigger. Im 5'2 and about 120lbs and my ultimate goal is to get 38in hips by next summer, is it possible? Also as a side note for my height and weight how many calories and protein should I be eating to fuel that muscle growth? I am currently eating about 2500 calories and 130g of protein, but I don't think I'm eating enough carbs, will this impact muscle growth?

Replies

  • heybalesheybales Member Posts: 17,949 Member Member Posts: 17,949 Member
    Calories to eat depends on your daily activity level all included.

    Protein often recommended is 0.8 g/lb of body weight.

    Muscle gain if all else is good - 1 lb monthly.

    As to getting bigger?
    Genetics so unknown.

  • sardelsasardelsa Member Posts: 9,637 Member Member Posts: 9,637 Member
    It's really hard to say. From what I've seen your height can be an advantage since taller people can put on muscle and struggle with it actually being apparent. It also depends on genetics and hormones. I have run 3 bulk/cut cycles and the first one had the most growth, the last two were more fine tuning.

    You can use a calorie calculator, take an average then use that amount and eat 150-250cals above your maintenance so 0.5lb gain per week or a bit less.
    Protein for bulking I think 0.8-1g per lb bodyweight is good.
    Carbs are important for muscle growth but there is really no minimum set amount. Eat enough to fuel your workouts and make you feel good. If you really struggle and prefer to keep them lower have carbs around your lifting sessions.

    Also make sure you are following progressive training with focus on glutes at least 2-3x per week

  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,579 Member Member Posts: 8,579 Member
    It will depend on you as a individual.

    How appropriate your programming is you as a individual as well as if you sensitive or resistant to training in general.

    Then we look at your calorie intake and what not.
  • cupcakesandproteinshakescupcakesandproteinshakes Member Posts: 782 Member Member Posts: 782 Member
    I don’t think it’s possible to give an exact timescale as so many variables, but I would say think in terms of months to years. You need Consistent training, decent programming tailored to your goals and a slight surplus so you gain around a pound a month. Some of the gain will be fat and some muscle.
  • kontehhalimakontehhalima Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
    Ok, I see. I just hope with hard work and dedication it happens by next spring or summer, I just hope I don't gain too much fat around my waist!
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,579 Member Member Posts: 8,579 Member
    Ok, I see. I just hope with hard work and dedication it happens by next spring or summer, I just hope I don't gain too much fat around my waist!

    As long as you are non-Asian and live in the US/Canada you want your waist circumference<34" to keep from having a higher risk of disease.

    I usually recommend switching to maintenance calories about 32".

  • ExistingFishExistingFish Member Posts: 1,109 Member Member Posts: 1,109 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Ok, I see. I just hope with hard work and dedication it happens by next spring or summer, I just hope I don't gain too much fat around my waist!

    As long as you are non-Asian and live in the US/Canada you want your waist circumference<34" to keep from having a higher risk of disease.

    I usually recommend switching to maintenance calories about 32".

    For 5'2" 32" is pretty big. I think the 34" might be for an average height male?

    I am 5'0" and I have a 27" waist and 35-36" hips.

    My waist was 33" when I was obese.
  • kontehhalimakontehhalima Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Ok, I see. I just hope with hard work and dedication it happens by next spring or summer, I just hope I don't gain too much fat around my waist!

    As long as you are non-Asian and live in the US/Canada you want your waist circumference<34" to keep from having a higher risk of disease.

    I usually recommend switching to maintenance calories about 32".

    For 5'2" 32" is pretty big. I think the 34" might be for an average height male?

    I am 5'0" and I have a 27" waist and 35-36" hips.

    My waist was 33" when I was obese.

    Woah- yea a 32in waist is way too big for me especially considering my height. When my waist was 29-30in I hated it which is why I decided to slim down a bit. If I'm bound to gain fat around my waist I'd be fine with about 28in and then cut try to cut back down to 26
  • northviewvintagenorthviewvintage Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    Yes, that might be for men. I read some research that suggested keeping your waist size less than half of your height lessens risk for disease, and that it could be better to measure than BMI to predict future health outcomes. So for 5'2 (which I am, also)
    I'd just try to make sure my waist measures under 30 0r 31 inches for optimal health, but 26 still sounds healthy depending on your body type.
    BTW when I was in my 20s I'd jump rope a lot and that will help you tone up really fast. You most likely know that already, though.:)
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Ok, I see. I just hope with hard work and dedication it happens by next spring or summer, I just hope I don't gain too much fat around my waist!

    As long as you are non-Asian and live in the US/Canada you want your waist circumference<34" to keep from having a higher risk of disease.

    I usually recommend switching to maintenance calories about 32".
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Ok, I see. I just hope with hard work and dedication it happens by next spring or summer, I just hope I don't gain too much fat around my waist!

    As long as you are non-Asian and live in the US/Canada you want your waist circumference<34" to keep from having a higher risk of disease.

    I usually recommend switching to maintenance calories about 32".

    For 5'2" 32" is pretty big. I think the 34" might be for an average height male?

    I am 5'0" and I have a 27" waist and 35-36" hips.

    My waist was 33" when I was obese.

  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,579 Member Member Posts: 8,579 Member

    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Ok, I see. I just hope with hard work and dedication it happens by next spring or summer, I just hope I don't gain too much fat around my waist!

    As long as you are non-Asian and live in the US/Canada you want your waist circumference<34" to keep from having a higher risk of disease.

    I usually recommend switching to maintenance calories about 32".

    For 5'2" 32" is pretty big. I think the 34" might be for an average height male?

    I am 5'0" and I have a 27" waist and 35-36" hips.

    My waist was 33" when I was obese.

    Woah- yea a 32in waist is way too big for me especially considering my height. When my waist was 29-30in I hated it which is why I decided to slim down a bit. If I'm bound to gain fat around my waist I'd be fine with about 28in and then cut try to cut back down to 26

    The study has shown that 33/37 for non Asian female/male.

    This is just a indicator of not going past this for risk of disease and death is substantially greater.

    I'm not saying get to that point, I'm saying if you do you are at risk.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,579 Member Member Posts: 8,579 Member
    Yes, that might be for men. I read some research that suggested keeping your waist size less than half of your height lessens risk for disease, and that it could be better to measure than BMI to predict future health outcomes. So for 5'2 (which I am, also)
    I'd just try to make sure my waist measures under 30 0r 31 inches for optimal health, but 26 still sounds healthy depending on your body type.
    BTW when I was in my 20s I'd jump rope a lot and that will help you tone up really fast. You most likely know that already, though.:)
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Ok, I see. I just hope with hard work and dedication it happens by next spring or summer, I just hope I don't gain too much fat around my waist!

    As long as you are non-Asian and live in the US/Canada you want your waist circumference<34" to keep from having a higher risk of disease.

    I usually recommend switching to maintenance calories about 32".
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Ok, I see. I just hope with hard work and dedication it happens by next spring or summer, I just hope I don't gain too much fat around my waist!

    As long as you are non-Asian and live in the US/Canada you want your waist circumference<34" to keep from having a higher risk of disease.

    I usually recommend switching to maintenance calories about 32".

    For 5'2" 32" is pretty big. I think the 34" might be for an average height male?

    I am 5'0" and I have a 27" waist and 35-36" hips.

    My waist was 33" when I was obese.

    BMI is only a early screening tool. Not a "hard rule".

    Doctor: What is their BMI? Low? Okay

    Or

    Doctor: what is there BMI? High? Okay next screening tool to see if it is out of line. This guy is a body builder and carries a lot of muscle mass compared to average person, no worries.

    BMI us quick and easy to use. Doesn't tell the whole story and many doctors are starting to use the waist circumference as a early screening tool.
    edited September 18
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