Resistance training

So I'm kinda new to doing resistance training properly. I've been in and out of gyms for years but never sure if I've been doing anything properly.

So I've got a nice book showing proper form and movement. But I'm unsure of about reps and sets and actual weight.

I've no interest in looking like Mr. Universe that's just unsightly to me personally. I'd quite like some athletic lean muscle.

So what's best? Low weight high reps? Is 3 sets of 10 and the last set to failure a good idea?

To give you an idea I'm still not the strongest person I'm only doing around 7-8 kg for a bicep curl for example

Replies

  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,249 Member
    Weight loss comes down to energy balance: calories expended > calories consumed

    In terms of strength training it seems that both low weight high reps and heavier weights with lower reps are effective, the more important factor being that you're lifting progressively (ie increasing weight or increasing reps) over time. Which book did you get? One that's well worth looking into is Beginning Strength by Mark Rippetoe.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,398 Member
    If you're concerned about doing it "properly", then get a trainer for at least a few sessions. It's one thing to look at a book. It's ANOTHER to properly execute the movements. There are SO MANY people in the gym that do movements incorrectly and can't figure out why they aren't progressing.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • Dogmom1978
    Dogmom1978 Posts: 1,580 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    If you're concerned about doing it "properly", then get a trainer for at least a few sessions. It's one thing to look at a book. It's ANOTHER to properly execute the movements. There are SO MANY people in the gym that do movements incorrectly and can't figure out why they aren't progressing.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    There are also a ton of people in the gym who lift the EXACT same weight for the EXACT same reps/sets and then don’t know why they aren’t progressing.

    So yes, form, get some help, but remember if you aren’t progressing on weight or reps or sets or some combination of the above, you also aren’t going to make much progress.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,097 Member
    edited October 2020
    Mr Universe comes from basically a full time job of training for many many years with that goal in mind along with extra help from antibolics. No worry about turning into a huge mass of muscle.

    Reps schemes can be highly individualized. Contrary to the myth we have to do certain reps to achieve adding mass, that is untrue. There is recent evidence showing we can add muscle in a variety of rep ranges. We just have to discover what works for us and our life.

    There isn't a recipe that works for every person, though the good ones will work for the majority of people that respond. If we are talking RPE we just want to work up to a reps scheme that brings us close to failure. Between one and three left in the tank is a good target.

    I can't stress enough to practice proper load management. Aim to build your adaptations up and not just go crazy. If you are untrained, you should respond robustly with very little stimulus to start. So more isn't better or necessary.

  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,097 Member
    edited October 2020
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    If you're concerned about doing it "properly", then get a trainer for at least a few sessions. It's one thing to look at a book. It's ANOTHER to properly execute the movements. There are SO MANY people in the gym that do movements incorrectly and can't figure out why they aren't progressing.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    There are also a ton of people in the gym who lift the EXACT same weight for the EXACT same reps/sets and then don’t know why they aren’t progressing.

    So yes, form, get some help, but remember if you aren’t progressing on weight or reps or sets or some combination of the above, you also aren’t going to make much progress.

    Not necessarily. We can change up things to dose a overload of stress without having to add weight, sets, or reps. Though it is more common to add one or more of those options under proper programming, there are many ways to overload useful stress and have a robust response.

    Progressing on the stress or the overload of it is the key, and there are many ways to accomplish that other that what you mentioned and reap progress.

    Food for thought.

  • gdfrew
    gdfrew Posts: 45 Member
    This is the book. Shows every muscle used, how to do the exercise. Watch to look out for and what to avoid. I'm hoping I can't really go wrong with this one. Fantastic book apart from the fact they decided to draw in the ladies nipples slightly weird if you ask me
  • DancingMoosie
    DancingMoosie Posts: 8,611 Member
    I like stronglifts 5x5 to start with for strength using free weights