Calorie Counter

Message Boards General Health, Fitness and Diet
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Gout

rushed2itrushed2it Member, Premium Posts: 21 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21 Member
Does anyone have ideas on how to avoid gout flare ups and recipes?

Replies

  • nooshi713nooshi713 Member Posts: 4,252 Member Member Posts: 4,252 Member
    I’m general, patients with gout should avoid pork, alcohol (especially beer), and some shellfish.
  • Diatonic12Diatonic12 Member Posts: 11,775 Member Member Posts: 11,775 Member
    Sometimes, gout is genetic. Gout and T2 diabetes often go hand in hand. First comes the gout and then comes T2. You can avoid all of the trigger foods and still have it. The only thing that makes that kind of pain go away is an Rx from the doctor.

    https://gouteducation.org/health-conditions/gout-and-diabetes/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4861921/

    https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(16)30724-0/pdf
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Member Posts: 6,184 Member Member Posts: 6,184 Member
    My husband gets gout. Has not found pork products or shellfish aggravate it.

    Food triggers vary between people.

  • HeidiCooksSupperHeidiCooksSupper Member, Premium Posts: 3,838 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,838 Member
    This is from gouteducation.org:

    ""Diet – Many foods can raise the level of uric acid in the blood. Chief among these are beer, beef, pork, shellfish and foods or beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (which causes uric acid to go up). High-fructose corn syrup is also found in sweetened soft drinks and juices; certain cereals and pastries; ice cream and candy; and processed foods at fast food restaurants. In some people with gout, eating these foods can trigger gouty flares.

    "Medications – Use of certain medications—especially diuretics or water pills and certain anti-rejection medications used in transplant patients—can increase uric acid levels in the blood."

    The Gout Education Society has lots of good information on their site and this page discusses dietary recommendations: https://gouteducation.org/diet-lifestyle/
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 38,204 Member Member Posts: 38,204 Member
    rushed2it wrote: »
    Does anyone have ideas on how to avoid gout flare ups and recipes?

    I have it...as diet goes, it really depends and it's one of those things where everyone is different. Some people are very sensitive to certain foods and others aren't. Beer is the one thing for me that I can pretty much count on a flare if I have more than one or two. Meat and other foods often attributable to gout don't seem to have much effect on me. On the other hand, I know people who have to eat very strictly to control their diet and frankly it's pretty rough and they still have to take meds to keep their UA levels down.

    It's something you'll likely have to play with. Have you seen a Rheumatologist? I'd highly recommend that as it was pretty much a game changer for me having someone who actually specializes in this rather than my GP.
  • rushed2itrushed2it Member, Premium Posts: 21 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21 Member
  • rushed2itrushed2it Member, Premium Posts: 21 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21 Member
    I don’t seem to have issues with pork, but eating shellfish was the start of it! Processed food seem to be a really strong candidate for flare ups. I’ve been trying to drink more fresh juices, but some of vegetables and fruits seem to cause flare ups as well! So I’ve just been trying random things!

  • EmpressBarbaraEmpressBarbara Member Posts: 18 Member Member Posts: 18 Member
    The science now suggests that diet has little to do with gout flare-ups, although you should eat a healthy diet in general. But I'll tell you what helps my hubby. He's a biochemist, and went about it in a scientific way. He thought, gout is caused by uric acid crystals in the joint. What do you do when you want to dissolve crystals? Well, you put them in warm liquid and stir. Obviously you can't add liquid to your joint, but he borrowed my foot spa that has heat and two vibration settings, and soaked his foot in really warm water while running the vibrating bit. Between the shaking and the heat his pain was relieved. Recently my bro-in-law visited, and his flare up was so bad he could barely walk, so we gave him the same treatment. He said it really helped.
  • SharpWellbeingSharpWellbeing Member Posts: 68 Member Member Posts: 68 Member
    Some really good advice in this thread but here are two further papers you may find interesting.

    The key principles of nutrition therapy in the above mentioned conditions include a restriction of purine amount in the diet and reaching the proper bodyweight.
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25252448/

    Stay hydrated, reduce caffeine consumption, potentially reduce intake of dairy and sugary foods:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27008448
  • nooshi713nooshi713 Member Posts: 4,252 Member Member Posts: 4,252 Member
    I think diet does play a large role in gout flare ups. I’m not saying it is the only cause, but it does play a role. I work in the ER and most people who come in with gout flare ups admit to recently eating trigger foods or drinking beer.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,110 Member Member Posts: 2,110 Member
    Diatonic12 wrote: »
    Sometimes, gout is genetic. Gout and T2 diabetes often go hand in hand. First comes the gout and then comes T2. You can avoid all of the trigger foods and still have it. The only thing that makes that kind of pain go away is an Rx from the doctor.

    https://gouteducation.org/health-conditions/gout-and-diabetes/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4861921/

    https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(16)30724-0/pdf

    I had really bad gout when I was at my biggest in my early 40s. I also believe I was prediabetic, so that makes sense to me. After losing the weight, though, and being as active as I am, I haven't suffered from it for years. Extremely painful though.

    Tart Cherry juice is also supposed to be fantastic for it. They also have Tart Cherry supplements. Also Quercetin and Alfalfa are good for it.
    edited November 19
  • franklin5280franklin5280 Member, Premium Posts: 76 Member Member, Premium Posts: 76 Member
    I have been on 300 mg Allopurinol for 10 years and no flair ups. Yes, it’s a prescription drug.
  • Retroguy2000Retroguy2000 Member Posts: 18 Member Member Posts: 18 Member
    Generally, reduce/avoid alcohol and red meats. Nobody has mentioned this one yet: drink lots of water.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,110 Member Member Posts: 2,110 Member
    I forgot this yesterday. The only reason I know this is my wife had Fibromyalgia for years and one quack doc believed that Mucinex (Guisefen, I believe is the generic name) cured Fibromyalgia (it didn't, BTW). But his theory was that Fibromyalgia was caused by a Uric Acid buildup. Seems that Guisefen is very good at ridding your body of excess Uric Acid, which is what causes gout.

    Guisefen is a pretty safe over the counter drug (and cheap). For really bad cases of gout, something to consider. I don't personally like OTC medications, but if it was really a bad flare, something to think about. But check with your doc to make sure there are no interactions.
    edited November 20
  • elisa123galelisa123gal Member Posts: 3,873 Member Member Posts: 3,873 Member
    My husband has it.. and a certain Belgium beer triggers it..also fatty steak. Celery and cherry juice are natural cures that help with attacks. Also, he takes Advil and it helps tremendously in getting the pain under control and on the road to recovery.

    When he eats right, drinks a lot of water..he is totally fine. Also his blood sugar is normal so not diabetic ..I don't now how true that statement up there is...
Sign In or Register to comment.